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Aron Nimzowitsch vs A Giese
match (1913), Riga
Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation (B12)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 36.Qxh6+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-26-08  handle: At first I was thinking along the lines of Nf6+, but I ended up getting it right. Sweet.
Mar-26-08  Samagonka: Wish I had stayed my mind on the idea of the Queen sac, but I dismissed it quickly again! This is getting bad, can't even recall the last time I solved a Wednesday puzzle with ease :(
Mar-26-08  JG27Pyth: JG27Pyth: Well, I took my time and made sure I'd looked at the whole board. Noticed that both rooks and the Queen were loose and only the Queen guarded the N. (One of Silman's preconditions for when to look for a combination is that pieces be loose.)

I noticed quickly that the white N and R were well positioned for an Arabian mate...but it took a while to see the Queen sac that sets up the Arabian Mate.

A rare Wednesday Queen sac. If this had been Monday we'd all have gotten it instantly, LOL.

I didn't calculate the Q sac declined line. I was convinced I'd found the puzzle solution and it didn't occur to me to calculate the offer declined...it would have worked out here, but actually, that kind of sloppiness leads to lost games. Must do better. C+

Mar-26-08  znprdx: Hey <CG> - since when does Monday follow Tuesday? Nevertheless it was nice to see a Nimzo game with a tactical shot - anyone suggest some others? I never really understood his prophalytic style but hypermodern play led to a major increase in draws - on the other hand made it more hopeful to play Black.
Mar-26-08  zb2cr: My, my, a Queen sacrifice leading to a forced mate on Wednesday--<chessgames.com> decided to mix things up!
Mar-26-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: <znprdx> Hypermodern play led to draw-happy chess? Interesting comment--but is that really what caused it? I thought it was a shift in the attitude of the players, if not a shift in the attitude of society in general.
Mar-26-08  sombreronegro: I thought 36 Nf5+ but the black knight on f4 defends g6. So that leave the queen sac I think. Looks like a rook king working together for mate. 36 Q x h6 g7 x h6 and then 37 Nf5+ K-h8 38 R-g8++
Mar-26-08  Andre Conde: Thank you very much, Eyal!
Mar-26-08  sombreronegro: "Hypermodern play led to draw-happy chess?"

I highly doubt it. The Indian defenses are not symmetrical and symmetrical positions tend to draw. Kings Indian , a classic hyper modern defense does not have early exchanges which also tend to draw less.

Mar-26-08  GibGezr: Saw the knight with a rook behind it on the 7th file, and immediately began looking for the pattern where t6he knight protects the rook and the only other escape square. Immediately saw that Qxh6+ stes it all up. Very fast for a Wednesday puzzle, and MUCH easier to see than yesterday's.
Mar-26-08  sombreronegro: ' "An attempt to defeat me with my own weapon. I first found the 7...Qa6 maneuver in San Sebastian 1912 against Duras, and Dr. Tarrasch has employed it successfully."

Typical Nimzo modesty.'

The same guy who thought Capa had no business in San Sebastián. 5 losses and 6 draws later he may have discovered a more modest approach.

Mar-26-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I answered this one very quickly. Any position with a knight able to get to f6 calls for an Arabian Mate. I'm surprized that black actually played it out and didn't try to escape by declining the queen sac.Even that is quick mate by:

36...♔g8 37 ♘f6+ ♔f8 38 ♕h8+ ♔f7 39 ♕xg7#.

I guess black went for the elegant mate to get his name in the paper.

Mar-26-08  MiCrooks: Hey, that was back in the day when is someone uncorked a nice Queen sac playing it out to mate was simply the gentlemanly thing to do!

Nice thing here is that you can't decline. I found a different ending, but mate is mate (I liked Qg8++ instead of Qxg7++ :)!

Mar-26-08  sneaky pete: <al wazir> You partly mistranslate the Nimzowitsch quote. He writes that he has succesfully introduced Qb6-a6 in 1912 against Duras <and> Dr. Tarrasch. The second game is Tarrasch vs Nimzowitsch, 1912.
Mar-26-08  sneaky pete:


click for larger view

<22.Qh5? ..> "Immediately decisive, as Ni(e)mzowitsch himself notes, was 22.Nfxh7! Nxh7 23.Nxf7+ Rxf7 23.Rxf7 .. and white the Bc7 to boot." Here if 23... Kh8 24.Qxg6 Nf8 25.Nh6+ Kh8 26.Qg5 .. should be sufficient.

Mar-26-08  LPeristy: Argh! I had so wanted the answer to be 36. Nf6+ gxf6 37. Qg4, but I didn't see that black has Rb8.
Mar-26-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: It's mate in three (as in the game) or four (as described by <Kevin86> on page 2 of the kibitzing here) for the solution to today's puzzle.
Mar-26-08  Jason Frost: "Ah, such an easy puzzle, 36.Nf6+ and it's over. This should be a monday/tuesday" I said after looking at the position for 10 seconds.

"Oh wait, woops" Bah I am pretty sure if I would have looked for another 10 seconds I would have seen it, bah.

Atleast 36.Nf6+ looks drawish for white ):

Mar-26-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <sneakypete: You partly mistranslate the Nimzowitsch quote.> Ja, ich hab' einen grossen Fehler gemacht. "As is well known [bekanntlich], the maneuver 7...Qa6 was first introduced by me with success in San Sebastian 1912 against Duras and Dr. Tarrasch."
Mar-26-08  zooter: Thanks to all who pointed out that

1) The king can flee and still get mated
2) The queen is under attack at the start

Didn't see both...!

Mar-26-08  MostlyAverageJoe: <patzer2: It's mate in three (as in the game) or four (as described by <Kevin86> on page 2 of the kibitzing here)>

Actually, at least four people described the same line on page 1, with best description from <dzechiel>

Mar-27-08  Terry McCracken: This must be a "Super Monday";)

White has mate in four.

1. Qxh6+!!..Kg8 (if 1..gh 2. Nf6+..Kh8 3. Rg8#) 2. Nf6+..Kf8 3. Qh8+..Kf7 4. Qxg7# or 4. Rxg7#

Mar-27-08  Mendrys: <"Hypermodern play led to draw-happy chess?"> I have to disagree with this. Hyper-modern theory actually breathed more life into chess. Let's remember that hundreds of years ago that the rules of chess were changed, the bishops and queen's scope were increased and castling was introduced because there were too many draws between the "masters" of the times. 19th century chess was a wild and wooly affair where the "firstest with the mostest" was the winner. Steinitz's modern style as elucidated by Dr. Lasker: "In the beginning of the game ignore the search for combinations, abstain from violent moves, aim for small advantages, accumulate them, and only after having attained these ends search for the combination – and then with all the power of will and intellect, because then the combination must exist, however deeply hidden." led to a deeper understanding of chess.

This was a big factor that led to "drawish" chess, at least amongst those who really understand chess. This being said I daresay that most of us on this forum rarely draw.

Mar-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Mendrys: <"Hypermodern play led to draw-happy chess?"> I have to disagree with this. Hyper-modern theory actually breathed more life into chess. Let's remember that hundreds of years ago that the rules of chess were changed, the bishops and queen's scope were increased and castling was introduced because there were too many draws between the "masters" of the times. 19th century chess was a wild and wooly affair where the "firstest with the mostest" was the winner. Steinitz's modern style as elucidated by Dr. Lasker: "In the beginning of the game ignore the search for combinations, abstain from violent moves, aim for small advantages, accumulate them, and only after having attained these ends search for the combination – and then with all the power of will and intellect, because then the combination must exist, however deeply hidden." led to a deeper understanding of chess.>

This discussion, like so many, is useless without statistics.

Mar-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessCoachClark: I like to show this game to my chess club members, not just as an example of the Arabian Mate, but also as an example of the need to keep looking for a win even when you are behind in material.
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