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Emil Sutovsky vs Vladimir Kramnik
Dortmund Sparkassen 2005 (2005)  ·  Spanish Game: Berlin Defense (C65)  ·  1-0
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-10-05  ughaibu: Just pointing out that with "Albin" Euripides refers to a Sicilian, (for the benefit of any like myself who assumed an Albin counter gambit).
Jul-10-05  euripides: <ugh> thanks ! I had remembered that it was something rare-ish and tricky and thought it was an Albin countergambit - it's a Lowenthal Sicilian.
Jul-10-05  mymt: Yes it does look like a Kings Indian maybe thats why Kramnik went for 10. ...f5.Now the strength of 10.Be3 is highlighted by Ng5 with e6 threat forcing the "contortionistic" ...Nf8.But what else is there? 10. ...c6? 10. ...0-0? dont like 10. ...h6 because 11.Qd2 & h6 is a target if Black plays ...0-0.
Jul-10-05  mymt: Perhaps we need to go back to move 9. & try ...Qxd7 [ or has that road already been traveled?]
Jul-10-05  Kangaroo: To <mymt>:

Perhaps the mistake by Kramnik was his premature <10... f5>. In my view, <10 ... h6> or <10 ... 0-0> would be much safer.

Jul-11-05  IDestroyChess: 10... h6 11.Qd2 f5! 12.exf5 Nxf5=
Jul-11-05  euripides: 10...Nf6 followed by Ng4 may also be possible.
Jul-11-05  Kangaroo: Speaking of alternatives to <10 ... f5> - I feel that <10 ... h6> is reasonable.

Should Black play <f7-f5> immediately or later - depends on the circumstances.

The suggestion <10 ... Nf6> does not look better than <10 ... f5>. White will respond <11. Nfd2> with the unavoidable <c2-c4> and <Nb1 - c3> - the same old King Indian, with the light-squared bishops missing. This will determine a light initiative for White... .

Jul-12-05  IDestroyChess: It's amazing, but black could defend in the middlegame. After 27...Bf6!! white should strive for draw.
Jul-12-05  aw1988: By the way, has anyone else noticed how this resembles a Chigorin-Steinitz crush?
Jul-13-05  Bobsterman3000: total domination. Kramnik should retire.
Jul-13-05  aw1988: Um, this wasn't exactly total domination. Kramnik made one mistake- hard to see it is indeed a mistake.
Jul-13-05  fgh: <aw1988>: Ignore him, he is just a pathetic Kasparov fan. He does not contribute any usefull opinions or inteligent analysis to this site. He just either says "Kasparov is a genius" or "Kramnik sucks. Get over it.", after which <AgentRgent> said "Ignore list. Get over it." :-)

<Bobsterman3000>: Maybe you should also look at the games Kramnik won, not only at the games he has lost, don't you think? Kramnik vs Topalov, 2005. Total domination, should Topalov retire? :-) Kasparov vs Topalov, 1999, absolute domination, should Topalov have retired after that game?

Jul-16-05  patzer2: Here's an analysis with Fritz 8 and the Opening Explorer:

<1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. d3 d6 5. O-O g6 6. d4 Bd7 7. Re1 Bg7 8. d5 Ne7 9. Bxd7+ Nxd7 10. Be3> This is a novelty which catches Kramnik by surprise. Previously played was 10. a4, which ended in a draw in Morozevich vs Kiril Georgiev, 2004. <10...f5?!> This is an error which allows White a dangerous initiative. Instead, Black should play 10... h6! 11. c4 f5 12. Qb3 f4 13. Bd2 O-O 14. Qxb7 Nc5 15. Qb5 Rb8 16. Qa5 Rxb2 17. Qxa7 Qd7 =. <11. Ng5 Nf8 12. exf5 gxf5 13. f4 Qd7 14. c4 Neg6 15. Nc3 h6 16. Nf3 e4 17. Nd4 h5 18. Ncb5 Kf7 19. Ne6 Nxe6 20. dxe6+ Kxe6 21. Qd5+ Ke7 22. c5!? c6 23. cxd6+!?> Maybe Black was expecting 23. Qxd6+ Qxd6 24. Nxd6 Ke6 25. Nxb7 Rhb8 26. Na5 Rxb2 27. Nxc6 = with an even endgame. <23... Kf8 24. Qb3 cxb5 25. Rac1 Qf7> No help for Black is 25... Qxd6 26. Red1! Qf6 27. Rc7 . <26. Qxb5 a6 27. Qb6 Kg8 28. Red1 Kh7?!> Defending cramped positions is difficult, even for Super GMs and super computers. However, Black may be able to hold with 28... Bf6 29. Rc7 Qe6 30. Qxb7 Rd8 31. Qxa6 Bxb2 32. Qb7 Bf6 33. a4 Ne7 34. Bc5 h4 35. Rd2 Ng6 36. Be3 h3 37. g3 Nf8 . <29. Rc7!> Sutkovsky initiates a winning pin leading to a decisive double attack. <29...Qf8 30. Bd4 Rg8 31. Qxb7! e3 32. Rf7! Rb8 33. Qd7 Rd8 34. Qxf5! Qxf7> Black must surrender the Queen or get mated (34... Qe8?? 35. Qxh5#). <35. Qxf7 Rxd6 36. Kf1!> With a decisive pawn majority, White prepares to trade Queen for Rook and Knight for a won endgame. <36...Nxf4 37. Qf5+ Rg6 38. Qxf4 Rf8 39. Qxf8 Bxf8 40. Bxe3 Re6 41. Kf2 Kg6 42. Rd5 Be7 43. Bc5 Bf6 44. b3 Be5 45. g3 h4 46. gxh4 Bxh2 47. h5+ Kh7 48. Kf3 Be5 49. Rd7+ Kh6 50. Kg4 Bg7 51. Rd6 1-0> This simplifying pin is decisive and forces Kramnik's resignation. However, even stronger here is 51. Bd6! Re4+ 52. Bf4+ Kh7 53. h6 .

Jul-26-05  Medusa: --roni.chessman: Give Krammy a break. He's just having a tough year. He's on a struggle period like Morozevich was. --

Well it seems that he is going to be there forever, LEKO MATCH, CORUS, MTEL , AND NOW DORTMUND

Jul-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: Sutovsky will be going over this game live on chess.fm at 1500hrs today.
Jul-27-05  aw1988: Joshka, thanks, I assume that's EST. Will be sure to tune in.
Jul-27-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Joshka: <aw1998> Hey, your most welcome! yes 3pm EST or ICC time. This is an awesome game, will be interesting to hear his comments. Hope the heavy accent is bearable though;-)....:-)
Oct-22-05  alexandrovm: a very nice game by Emil
Dec-27-05  Queens Gambit: Mr Boring K got slammed here!!
Dec-31-05  Queens Gambit: <Bobsterman3000: total domination. Kramnik should retire>

you said it!!

Jan-26-06  EricCartman: <Bobsterman3000> Don't worry, Kramnik will retire in a few weeks, after he played me
Jul-29-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: This is an excellent teaching game for the technique of exploiting a pin by piling on. After 28 ... Kh7:


click for larger view

29. Rc7 Qf8 30. Bd4 Rg8 31. Qxb7 and here Black played the clever 31 ... e3! which sets a big trap. If 31 ... Rb8?! 32. Bxg7! wins material = 32 ... Rxg7 33. Rxg7+ Qxg7 34. Qxb8, or 32 ... Rxb7 33. Bxf8+ Rxc7 34. dxc7 Rxf8 35. Rd8 and the Pc7 Queens. The game went 32. Rf7 (Remove the Guard) Rb8 33. Qd7! Rd8 34. Qxf5 with a mate threat so Black resorted to 34 ... Qxf7 35. Qxf7 and White won. But after 32. Rf7 Rb8 all 3 of my students wanted to cash in with 33. Bxg7?! Rxg7 (33 ... Rxb7 should work too, but just wait) 34. Rxg7+ Qxg7 35. Qxb8:


click for larger view

Now 35 ... e2 36. Re1 Qd4+ 37. Kh1 Qf2! and suddenly Black wins (38. h3 Qxe1+ 39. Kh2 h4). So this game also demonstrates Pawn promotion tricks plus Weak Back Rank.

Jan-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  refutor: 6.d4 is an interesting move...go through opening explorer and look at some of the beatings that black takes after he opens up the center with 6. ...exd4. very counter intuitive. sutovsky tried to explain it in the NIC but i didn't really understand his explanation. i was trying to work out where white got the tempo back if he played 10.c4 (instead of 10.Be3) so he wouldn't just be down a tempo on a king's indian, and i guess it was the Bd7. a lot of poise and creativity by Sutovsky
Feb-14-09  ruelas007: yet another candidate to be called seventh heaven
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