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Oscar Panno vs James Macrae Aitken
"Pannoc Attack" (game of the day May-31-2017)
13th olm qual. group 3 (1958), Munich, rd 5, Oct-05
Benoni Defense: Pawn Storm Variation (A66)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 38.Qg7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 5 OF 5 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-13-11  sevenseaman: 38. Qxg7+! The start of what a scintillating combination. With Panno you can be sure he will permeate your consciousness unnoticed somewhere and bring you unforeseen delight.
Sep-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <sevenseaman: ....With Panno you can be sure he will permeate your consciousness unnoticed somewhere and bring you unforeseen delight.>

Find me a woman who will perform this feat, will ya? I love them unforeseen delights!

Sep-14-11  sevenseaman: <perfidious> <Find me a woman who will perform this feat, will ya? I love them unforeseen delights!>

You think she will ever be a supernumerary? I can only share <Panno>.

Sep-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  drleper: <LIFE Master AJ> It just sounded a little humorous as the king had only one legal move, which was followed by # in 1. Your method of doing your analysis first without the computer, and then checking with it sounds excellent, but pointing out that 39...Kg8 had been rubber stamped by Fritz to lead to # in 1 was the thing that peeps were having a go at. And the lines after 39...QxP really are not very mentionable (clean rook up with zero black counterplay), even for a weakie like myself.
Sep-14-11  Shams: <AJ><I was just at the LA State Champ. I offered to go over a game with a young man, but his Dad insisted that they go to the room and fetch his laptop and Rybka. Its not that the program isn't better than probably ANY human, in fact it most definitely is! But I just got the feeling that they were addicted to using their computer.>

Man, I could not agree more. Several years back I had occasion to count, as one of my students, a young man of amazing ability who for a time held the record of 'youngest master in America'. I had not a stitch to do with his development, in all probability.

Among this young man's other teachers was a fellow who boasted, who actually related with glee, to me and other teachers, of his reliance on Fritz as his primary, if not exclusive, teaching tool. I found that I detested this attitude.

Engines find moves. In learning chess, we should look for ideas. Sometimes you really do just need a move, but first and foremost, you need ideas. That young man's father who passed up a chance to get free ideas from a master was kind of an idiot, to be frank.

Sep-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: This line of discussion regarding the silicon monster vs the merits of learning on one's own reminds me of an exchange between Kirk and Spock in the original Star Trek episode 'The Ultimate Computer', in which Spock displays chilling prescience, though I don't recall exactly what Spock said.

No Firtz or Shredder is going to explain to a beginner why a particular move is often good over another, and in that charming little vignette described in New Orleans, that's a parent with plenty to learn, and a student on the way to learning the wrong lesson in something far more important than a mere game of chess.

Our culture-if one wishes to call it that-has taught people that getting ahead, by hook or crook, is the only acceptable outcome and damn the means used, or the number of bodies over which one must step on the way to that end, humanity and common decency be damned.

Sep-16-11  LIFE Master AJ: Perhaps you have a VERY valid point ... it just seems that everytime that I fail to check something on the computer, something gets missed.
Sep-16-11  LIFE Master AJ: The old saw: "It's better to be safe ... than sorry!" applies here.
Sep-16-11  SimonWebbsTiger: it pays to listen to experts. Yasser Seirawan and Alex Yermolinsky are regulars on the ICC coverage of GM events. The number of times someone writes: "Bad move. Move x and Rybka gives a +0.31 eval" and they start saying things like: "Well, this may be true but what you have to realise is the resulting position requires every moves every time; easy for a computer, but impossible for a human".

Capablanca once said opening theory is like glasses -- both aid vision but don't give it. Capa's statement could be updated to include the silicon.

Sep-16-11  LIFE Master AJ: Good point.
Sep-16-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <SimonWebbsTiger: it pays to listen to experts. Yasser Seirawan and Alex Yermolinsky are regulars on the ICC coverage of GM events. The number of times someone writes: "Bad move. Move x and Rybka gives a +0.31 eval"...>

Every time I read some string of evaluations along these lines, I want to throw up-who cares whether a position is .26 or -.07, if one doesn't know how to handle the positions which result therefrom?

This is where understanding what one plays nearly always counts for far more than rote memorisation.

<...and they start saying things like: "Well, this may be true but what you have to realise is the resulting position requires every moves every time; easy for a computer, but impossible for a human"...>

The explosion in chess engines has made it possible for even weak players who have the money and just enough understanding of the game to become 2750 players from behind their computer and pick apart every idea suggested by stronger, more experienced players such as the posters in this thread.

Is it any wonder that these strong GMs scoff at computer evals, thrown out there at every turn?

<...Capablanca once said opening theory is like glasses -- both aid vision but don't give it. Capa's statement could be updated to include the silicon.>

Someone better explain that to the kid and his father in New Orleans.

Dec-06-11  King Death: < LIFE Master AJ: Always play over the game 2-3 times with just your HEAD ... then fire up Fritz. (I am afraid in this day of laptops everywhere, machines have become something of a crutch - I think that some over-use the technology, instead of trying to learn from it.)>

Is it a lack of self confidence? Who knows? When that kind of help is at hand, maybe it's just easier. Not that it helps a player in the long run if all they do is rely on it.

<I was just at the LA State Champ. I offered to go over a game with a young man, but his Dad insisted that they go to the room and fetch his laptop and Rybka. Its not that the program isn't better than probably ANY human, in fact it most definitely is! But I just got the feeling that they were addicted to using their computer.

Since when did the tool become the master over its user?>

I wonder how strong this kid will be in 10 years. Analyzing games is how a developing player gains a sense of how the pieces work together and what weaknesses and strengths are. Anybody who relies on the engine to do it all isn't going to be able to solve problems at the board sometime along. Old Fritzie or Rybka do it all.

May-14-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Panno! at the Disco.
May-31-17  bcokugras: Why didn't black play 8... Kxe4?
May-31-17  Poulsen: <bcokugras><Why didn't black play 8... Kxe4?>

You must mean Nxe4 - in anycase white has a queen check on a4 - and black loses a piece for the pawn.

May-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: That Knight on <f5> will get you every time

*****

May-31-17  Iwer Sonsch: Wait, which one was considered one of the worst puns of the year? This one right here is clearly a stronger candidate.
May-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Hey, have you tried panno?
May-31-17  BornAmish: < Nietzowitsch: Religions are just tools, too.

If no one believe in god will he still exist?>

"Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ." Colossians 2:8

May-31-17  johngalt5579: I kind of like "piano lesson"
May-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White doesn't even have to recapture the queen!
May-31-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Good thing Black got checkmated. Otherwise he loses his queen.
May-31-17  The Kings Domain: Fine game. This is why I never liked the Benoni, white gains a strong position and black a cramped one.
May-31-17  The Kings Domain: BornAmish: Good reply.
Jun-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gilmoy: <38.Qg7+!> is a familiar (if rare) theme. <Once> wrote it thus: G Ferrantes vs A M Giustolisi, 1956 (kibitz #13) <... pawns ... can easily get stuck. Sometimes what they need is the chance to capture something so they can move diagonally around an obstruction.>

When the Ph6's diagonal capture opens h for an R <and> protects it at h8 for a triangle mate, it's a <Game Collection: The Swinging Gate: Push That P to 6 or 3!>. Here we see a nice variation: h7 blocks h (which prunes that pattern away), but the Ph6's movement is a <clearance> for Marshall's "ant major" mate, with the protected Pg7 as the two mandibles of a big warrior-caste ant.

Black's Qf7 usefully denies a flight square. Throwing her away leaves Black down a Rook.

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