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Krunoslav Hulak vs Davor Rogic
Croatian Championship (2005), Vukovar CRO, rd 5, Nov-11
Queen's Gambit Declined: Cambridge Springs Variation (D52)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-31-07  MostlyAverageJoe: <dzechiel: ... 21 Bh7+ Kh8 22 Bg6 .... Black can't take the bishop, and we are now threatening 23 Nxf7+ and 24 Nxd8. The only way for black to save the rook is to move it (22...Kg8 allows 23 Bxf7+ Kh8 24 Ng6+ and 25 Nxe7>

Better yet:

22. ... Kg8 23. Bxf7+ Kh8 24. Ng6+ Kh7 <forced> 25. Nxf8+! Kh8 <forced> 26. Qh7#

Therefore after 22. ... Kg8 23. Bxf7+ black would have to play 23 ... Qxf7, trading his Q+P for white's B+N.

Oct-31-07  Pwned: <dzechiel: .... After

22...Re8

Not 22...Rd5 as that allows 23 Rxc8

23 Bxf7

On the rook as well as threatening 24 Ng6+. This seems to win an exchange and pawn for sure.>

Or even better for white after 22...Re8 is 23. Nf7+ Kg8 24. Bh7+ Kf7 25. Qg6#

Oct-31-07  cyruslaihy: wat??? winning the exchange is the answer? no mate?
Oct-31-07  a q maclanahan: yes, the puzzle is to find the best move, mate is not required. if you click on the link on the home page beneath the puzzle diagram the ground rules for the puzzles are discussed.
Oct-31-07  Jesspatrick: I play the black side of the Cambridge Springs defense, and I don't like 10...c5. Though the idea is to give white an isolated d-pawn, it appears to be a waste of time.

It's better to play 10...Re8 and prepare 11...e5

Oct-31-07  anandrulez: <cyruslaihy: > it will lead to a mate soon ...some 20-30 more moves maybe
Oct-31-07  greensfield: How to get a Knight in a position to create havoc

<21.Bh7+ Kh8(forced)22.Bg6!

if <22...fxg6 23.Nxg6+ Kg8 24.Nxe7+ Bxe7>(winning Queen for Knight)

if <22...f5 23.Nf7+ Kg8 24.Nxd8 Qxd8> (winning the exchange with d5 to come)

if <22...f6 23.Nf7+ Qxf7(23...Kg8 24.Bh7+ Kxf7 25.Qg6#)Bxf7>(winning Queen or mate)

if <22...Qf6 23.Nxf7+ Kg8 24.Nxd8 Qxd8 25.Qf3> (winning exchange with d5 to come & threat Qf7+)

Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: I saw White's moves Bh7+ and Bg6 but I did not see the obvious reply ...f5. So I imagined that the combination was even more decisive than it really is.

Winning a clear exchange is decisive enough, though.

I enjoy puzzles where the Bishop, having checked at h7, is able to hang around in the vicinity (g6 or g8) and cause trouble.

Oct-31-07  psmith: well, that was pretty easy. whereas yesterday's i didn't get at all...
Oct-31-07  RandomVisitor: 10...Bd7, 10...Qc7, or 10...Re8 were all better than 10...c5, equalizing and perhaps avoiding later problems.
Oct-31-07  HOTDOG: Petrosian played a similar move against Taimanov
Petrosian vs Taimanov, 1955
Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: Thanks <HOTDOG>. That game is a good example.
Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I missed this one-relying on a possible sac at g6 by the knight to bring in the queen. I couldn't find anything afterward.
Oct-31-07  Tariqov: go to youtube and i think you will be suprised, must be a halloween scare.
Oct-31-07  YouRang: Got it, after a couple minutes trying to decide if the attack was going to go queenside or kingside.

I settled on kingside after noticing that after 21. Bh7+ Kh8 (forced), white has 22. Bg6!, immune thanks to the knight fork.

Meanwhile white's attack carries other threats, and black cannot cope with them all. Most notable is Nxf7+ winning the exchange, or Rxc8 (if the Rd8 leaves the back rank), or Ng6+ winning the queen (if the pawn at f7 is removed), or Bxf7+ (if ...Re8 or ...Kg8).

Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: At first, I could not see why (after 21.♗h7+ ♔h8 22.♗g6) Black would play 22. f5, acquiescing in the loss of the exchange by the Knight fork (when he seemingly could minimize his material loss at just one pawn on f7). Upon closer examination, however, it became apparent that plausible alternatives were actually much worse, for example: 22...♔g8 23.♗xf7+ wins the Black Queen; and 22...♖e8 23.♗xf7 (Δ 24. ♘g6+ forking King and Queen) ♕f6 (23. ♕d8 or 23. ♕d6 would allow a forced mate starting with 24. ♘g6+) 24.♗xe8 wins a whole Rook.
Oct-31-07  Magic Castle: <chessgames,com> How come the board on my screen does not show the white king bishop.
Oct-31-07  xrt999: <anandrulez: <cyruslaihy: > it will lead to a mate soon ...some 20-30 more moves maybe>

Black has exchanged a rook for bishop. This is not the end of the world; I would play this as black, since white has to play these 20-30 moves perfectly to keep the advantage.

Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's puzzle solution, White sets up a winning Knight Fork with the deflection 21. Bh7+!!, followed by the surprise decoy offer 22. Bg6!

After 22. Bg6! Black loses the exchange for decisive material loss or suffers even worse after moves like 22...Rd5? 23. Rxc8 (as noted by <dzechiel>)

Oct-31-07  JamesBJames: Three for three!

It took me about five minutes to get it. I looked for Bh7+ Kh8 continuations and found the beautiful Bg6! after a while. If black takes the pawn, white wins the queen in a fork, and if he does nothing, white has another fork that wins the rook. Nice one!

Oct-31-07  grabapawnski: 21) Bh7+ Kh8 22) Bg6 ...

Patzer2 says: "if 22...Rd5? 23)Rxc8 wins (as noted by <dzechiel>)" <dzechiel> prefers 22)...Re8

Much better is: if 22)... Rd5?? or Re8?? 23)Nxf7+ Kg8? 24)Bh7+ KxN (only move) 25)Qg6 mate.

To avoid these mates black must play 23)....QxN when 24)BxQ 1-0

Oct-31-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: Am I the only one who didn't get this? I saw Bh7+, Khh8; and then bollixed it up by moving my Knight, Ng6+. Couldn't find a good combination after that.
Oct-31-07  Alphastar: White to play, Medium/Easy. Aight, we are again well-posted for an attack. Here's what I see: 21. Bh7+ Kh8 22. Bg6! which should, at the very least, guarantee the win of the f7-pawn. Probably more. Black cannot guard it adequately.
Whatever black is going to play, 23. Bxf7 is next up, and then something like 24. Ng6+ with obliteration: 24. ..Kh7 25. Nxf8++ Kh8 26. Qh7#. Aight, I don't think there is anything black can do about this. Time to check. ***********
I see black actually accepted the loss of the exchange and a pawn, which was probably the best thing to do. The important feature of this puzzle was the uselessness of the black pieces (Bc8, Bf8, Rd8, Ra6 are all doing nothing at all).
Oct-31-07  YouRang: <playground player: Am I the only one who didn't get this? I saw Bh7+, Khh8; and then bollixed it up by moving my Knight, Ng6+. Couldn't find a good combination after that.>

I suppose that it simply takes practice to develop the thought process required to solve such problems.

Once we get past Monday or Tuesday, it becomes difficult to make progress with the "computerish" thought process of "Try this move and see what happens".

One must learn to perceive <potential> tactics, and then work backwards to see if they can be realized.

-- Initial Analysis:
I think you might agree that in the given (21. ?) position, white's most dangerous looking pieces appear to be the knight and bishop, although there may be potential for the Rc1, since the black Bc8 is only guarded once, and of course our queen might slide to g3 or h3 (although, where it is, it forms a nice battery with the bishop). After summarizing the position, you can start looking for tactics.

-- Tactical Analysis:
(1) After a few moments, you would probably decide that there is no obvious place to move the knight, but while looking, you should note that at g6, the knight attacks the queen. Of course, g6 is guarded by Pf7 and even if not, the queen could simply move away. But you should at least make note of the <fork potential>, especially since the black king is next to a forking square.

(You might also note that Nc6 is interesting, as it forks the queen and rook, although c6 is guarded Pb7. That pawn is also guarding the black rook, and if not for the bishop at c8, the move 21. Nc6 bxc6 22. Qxa6 would win the exchange. Still, it's worth making the mental note.)

(2) Another obvious move to consider is Bh7+ (always look at checks). This has the effect of forcing the black king to h8, but little else. However, having the king on h8 should create a <mental link> back to the knight fork idea in (1), above. With the king a h8, the queen winning Ng6+ fork is prevented only by the f7 pawn.

(3) <Working backwards>, how can you get rid of (i.e. capture, displace, etc.) the f7 pawn (to make Ng6+ possible)? With this goal in mind, the move Bg6! should soon suggest itself. The bishop is clearly immune to fxg6, thanks to the knight fork. Besides that, it does some other wonderful things. It creates a double attack on the now singly guarded Pf7, it threatens another knight fork with Nxf7+ winning the exchange, and it threatens Bxf7 if the king goes back to g8 or if the rook goes to e8.

-- Conclusion:
Even though we didn't get the queen winning knight fork that we dimly foresaw in (1), the threat of that knight fork created a nice material-winning combination.

May-25-08  newzild: A very nice summary, YouRang.
My own thought process was almost exactly the same, except that I tend to look at the f7 square more closely whenever it is not protected by a Rf8. Also, the pawn on h7 suggests a slight weakness of g6.

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