chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Zahar Efimenko vs Alexander Cherniaev
2nd Coventry Chess International (2005), Coventry ENG, rd 3, Mar-25
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense (C65)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

NOTE: You are using our new chess viewer, "Olga." For more info see the Olga Quickstart Guide. You can switch back to the old viewer (pgn4web) from the pulldown menu below. If you have questions or suggestions see our Olga chessforum.

explore this opening
find similar games 929 more games of Efimenko
sac: 10.Nxd5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some people don't like to know the result of the game in advance. This can be done by registering a free account then visiting your preferences page, then checking "Don't show game results".

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Today's Game of the Day for 6/17/2012 inspired me to search for other games with the trappy 4...Ne7. It seems to be a pretty bad move, as this game indicates, in which White resorts to the same sacrificial attack seen in J N Berger vs P Gaspary, 1889. Black always seems to run into trouble on the a2-g8 diagonal.
Jun-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <An Englishman> 4...Ne7 is the Mortimer Trap, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruy_Lo..., named for James Mortimer, a perennial rabbit who had a very long chess career. True to form, he lost thrice with his trap at the great London 1883 tournament, apparently where he introduced the trap. However, others did better with it at the same tournament - Zukertort (the tournament winner) drawing Englisch with it while Ranken (later the co-author of <Chess Openings Ancient and Modern>) won a game with it in the concurrent minor tournament. http://www.chessgames.com/perl/ches... Incidentally, I have a post regarding Mortimer and his connection to Paul Morphy at http://chicagochess.blogspot.com/20....

Opening Explorer shows that the Mortimer Trap hasn't done too well, though it is good for the occasional 5-move win, J G Nicholson vs T Spanton, 2007. But see R C Griffith vs NN, 1888. The winner of the latter game later became the co-author of Modern Chess Openings. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern...

Jun-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: For more on Mortimer's Trap, see Edward Winter's article at http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/.... He says that Griffith denied ever winning the game I cited above.
Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  centralfiles: <FSR> I use it regularly and have good results coming out of the opening with it. I don't think the whitewashing we see in CG database (+23 -6 =8 with top 3 moves) reflects Blacks actual chances It's probably just a very poor sample. If white just plays naturally Black gets comfortable positions that are easy to play.
Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  centralfiles: This game seems to have been played very well. Looks like Efimenko might have prepared the line, though cherniev defends well. Whites moves starting with 5.Nc3 all seem part of a coherent plan to bust ..Ne7. White will forgo castling force a hole at g5 and play against f7 immiedately, then sac Knight and Bb5+. Black having no real options other than ...c6 and ...Ng6 has no real way to avoid whites plan. 10.Nxd5!! had to have been planned all along or else white has nothing.
Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  centralfiles: However before we close the book on ...Ne7
What about 9...b5! Bb3 cxd5


click for larger view

Now white will no longer be able to play Bb5+ making the knight sac less attractive. Though Black gets shakier pawns and probably a slightly worse endgame in some lines.

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collection [what is this?]
Anti-Berlin System: 4. d3 , Part Two
by Ron


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC