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Zappa (Computer) vs Rybka (Computer)
IPCCC (2005), ?, rd 4, Dec-28
Queen's Indian Defense: Kasparov-Petrosian Variation. Kasparov Attack (E12)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 7 times; par: 133 [what's this?]

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sac: 58...Rxc5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-22-06  THE pawn: Rybka has no endgame knowledge and still manages to win.
Jan-22-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: This is really scary, <THE pawn>.

It beat the reigning computer champion without any tablebase knowledge because the program does not yet support it. Yikes!

Jan-28-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 b6 4. a3 Bb7 5. Nc3 d5 6. cxd5 Nxd5 7. Qc2 Nxc3 8. bxc3 Be7 9. e4 O-O 10. Bd3 c5 11. O-O Qc7 12. Qe2 Nc6 13. Bb2 Na5 last book move

14. e5 -0.40/18 cxd4 -0.30/18
15. cxd4 -0.29/18 Nb3 -0.19/18
16. Bxh7+ -0.19/18 Kxh7 -0.20/18
17. Qd3+ -0.20/18 Kg8 -0.19/18
18. Qxb3 -0.18/18 Bd5 -0.18/18
19. Qe3 -0.19/18 Qb7 -0.18/18
20. Rfc1 $15 -0.32/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 20. h4 Bxf3 21. gxf3 Rac8 22. Rac1 Bxh4 23. Kg2 Qe7 24. Rh1 Bg5 25. f4 Rxc1 26. Rxc1 $11 -0.18/18)

20... b5 -0.33/18
21. Ne1 -0.30/18 a5 -0.36/18
22. f3 -0.29/18 Rfc8 -0.28/18
23. Nd3 -0.28/18 b4 -0.23/18
24. Nc5 -0.23/18 Qb6 -0.28/18
25. Rc2 -0.28/18 b3 -0.22/18
26. Rc3 -0.23/18 Rc6 -0.22/18
27. Rac1 -0.22/18 Rac8 -0.13/18
28. h3 $15 -0.31/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 28. g3 Qb5 29. h4 a4 30. h5 Bf8 31. Kf2 R8c7 32. Ne4 Be7 33. Rxc6 $11 -0.13/18)

28... Qb5 -0.30/18
29. Kf2 -0.32/18 a4 -0.33/18
30. Qe2 $15 -0.56/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 30. g3 Bd8 31. Ne4 Qa5 32. h4 Rxc3 33. Nxc3 Bb7 34. Ne4 Rxc1 35. Qxc1 Bd5 36. Nd6 f5 $15 -0.33/18)

30... Bh4+ -0.56/18
31. Kf1 -0.56/18 Qb8 -0.56/18
32. Kg1 -0.56/18 Bg5 -0.48/18
33. Rb1 -0.48/18 Qb6 -0.47/18
34. Bc1 -0.47/18 Be7 -0.49/18
35. Be3 -0.48/18 Qa5 -0.47/18
36. Rcc1 -0.49/18 Bh4 -0.38/18
37. Kh1 -0.47/18 R6c7 -0.47/18
38. Bd2 -0.47/18 Qa7 -0.47/18
39. Rc3 -0.47/18 Be7 -0.47/18

Jan-28-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: Part 2 of analysis:
40. Be3 -0.47/18 Rc6 -0.47/18
41. Re1 -0.55/18 Qa5 -0.55/18
42. Rec1 -0.52/18 Rb8 -0.55/18
43. Qb2 -0.55/18 Qb5 -0.51/18
44. Kh2 -0.55/18Bd8 -0.55/18
45. Bf4 -0.56/18 Ba5 -0.60/18
46. Re3 -0.57/18 Bb6 -0.60/18
47. Rec3 -0.60/18 Rbc8 -0.60/18
48. Be3 -0.60/18 Bd8 -0.55/18
49. R3c2 -0.55/18 Kh7 -0.55/18
50. Rd2 -0.57/18 Kh8 -0.53/18
51. Rdd1 -0.54/18 Kg8 -0.50/18
52. Re1 -0.61/18 Qb8 -0.53/18
53. Kh1 -0.55/18Be7 -0.53/18
54. Rg1 -0.68/18 Qb5 -0.68/18
55. Rge1 -0.67/18 f6 -0.69/18
56. exf6 $17 -1.15/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 56. Bf4 Kf7 57. exf6 gxf6 58. Be3 Bd6 59. Bf2 Rh8 60. Qd2 Kg6 61. Rb1 Rd8 62. Qd1 Bc7 $15 -0.69/18)

56... Bxf6 -1.30/18
57. Qd2 -1.23/18 Bc4 -1.14/18
58. Kh2 $19 -1.67/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 58. Rb1 e5 59. Bg5 exd4 60. Bxf6 gxf6 61. Ne4 Bd3 62. Rbd1 b2 $17 -1.14/18)

58... Rxc5 -1.74/18
59. dxc5 -1.42/18 b2 -1.42/18
60. Rb1 -1.76/18 Rd8 -1.74/18
61. Qf2 -1.81/18 Bd3 -1.79/18
62. Bg5 $19 -2.39/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 62. Bf4 Qc4 63. Bd6 Qa2 64. Rxb2 Qxb2 65. Qg3 Be2 66. Qg4 Qa2 67. Qg3 Bb5 68. Be5 $19 -1.79/18)

62... Bd4 -2.76/18
63. Be3 -2.81/18 Be5+ -2.81/18
64. f4 -2.81/18 Bxb1 -2.82/18
65. Rxb1 -2.83/18 Qd3 -2.85/18
66. Qd2 -2.70/18 Bf6 -2.70/18
67. Qxd3 -2.87/18 Rxd3 -2.88/18
68. Bg1 -3.61/18 Rd2 -3.68/18
69. h4 -4.02/18 Kf7 -4.02/18
70. h5 -4.20/18 Ke7 -4.20/18
71. c6 -4.20/18 Kd6 -4.21/18
72. Ba7 -4.90/18 Kxc6 -4.90/18
73. Bb8 -6.14/18 Kd5 -6.14/18
74. f5 $2 $19 -8.36/18
(♖ybka 1.01 ♗eta 13 32-bit: 74. Bc7 Rc2 75. Ba5 Rc1 76. Rxb2 Bxb2 77. Bb4 Rc4 78. Bf8 Rxf4 79. Be7 Kc4 80. g3 Rf7 $19 -6.14/18)

74... exf5 -8.36/18
75. Bf4 -8.73/18 Rd3 -8.73/18
76. h6 -9.35/18 gxh6 -9.35/18
77. Bc1 -9.35/18 0-1

Jan-28-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: 55...f6 and 58...Rxc5 are the key points of the game. Nice rook sacrifice to advance a passed pawn. All the mistakes were Zappa's.
May-07-06  CapablancaFan: Amazing how the Rybka program saw and calculated 58...Rxc5!
May-12-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: This is really a brilliant game by Rybka.
May-12-06  Brown: <brilliant>??? Perhaps in that it dazzles, and is impressive, but it sounds strange to describe the program as "brilliant." Of course, I know you are describing the game, so this makes a little more sense. I think computer chess is just wild, and hard to describe...
May-18-06  crwynn: 15...Nb3, giving up the h-pawn to get the two bishops, is reminiscent of Bogoljubov vs Janowski, 1924, which Kotov used in "play like a grandmaster" to illustrate the power of the bishop pair.

This game also illustrates it very well; 58...Rxc5! activates the dark-squared bishop, and illustrates the power of a passed pawn when supported by both bishops.

But the winning manuever here is the profound 49...Kh7!! announcing a plan of ...Kh8, ...Kg8 etc., which White is helpless to prevent. Indeed, from about move 30 to 54 the computers are clearly playing chess on a level beyond mortal ken, though Nimzowitsch vs Systemsson, 1927 occasionally approaches the depth and strength of play here.

Incidentally, there are never fewer than 12 men on the board, so Rybka's lack of tablebase support was not a handicap here. And it seems to me that the after the queens came off the win was rather easy anyway; despite being a pawn up, White is helpless - the king is misplaced on the k-side, and it is impossible to prevent both ...Rc1 and ...Rd3-a3-a1.

Oct-11-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Bloody and painful torment of greedy pawn-grabber. Rybka's nice work with Bishop pair really reminds Janowski's masterpiece against Bogo.:-)
Jul-26-15  Kukunda: Mmmm! I will play like Rybka one day very soon
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