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Eduard Gufeld vs Bozidar Ivanovic
"Don't Judge a Rook by its Cover" (game of the day Feb-23-2006)
Spartak (1979), Sochi Soviet Ukraine
Sicilian Defense: Lasker-Pelikan Variation. General (B33)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-05-07  vibes43: Thanks <wouldpusher: <vibes43> 30. ... 0-0 31. xe6+ xe6 32. xe6 xg5 33. g6+ xg6 34. xg6+ h8 35. xh5+ and slowly but surely the extra pawns will win for White.> for the analysis.

I now don't doubt that white would win. It would be interesting, though, if someone could post a computer analysis of the best (for black) remaining line to help study this end game scenario from move 35. ... above.

Aug-05-07  tallinn: If there is a position you need to be "insane" to win it, this is. I failed miserably, and not only once, as Fritz 8 presented me a new "insane" problem at almost every move. Just look at this line: Rxf5 gxf Rxf5 b5 Qa5 (I tried Bxb5 first here which leads to a q+b+many pawns vs. r+b+b+n and few pawns ending which is hard, but possible to win - if you are of the patient kind) Nb6 Bxh5+ Rxh5 Rxh5 Bd4+ Kh1 Bh3!? Rg5 Qf8 Nxd6+ Kd7


click for larger view

There had been some very very hard to find moves already, white has three pawns for a piece, blacks king on the run, two black pieces are hanging, and still you have to sac another rook here: Rf5! is needed to realize most out of the position, Qe1 is much weaker. In fact Bxf5 looses immediately as Qxb6 threads mate on b7 and c6, just look at that position and tell me a guy who had calculated that from the original puzzle position:


click for larger view

Fritz continued with Nxd5 instead and after Rxf8 Rxf8 white has won the queen, but still has to be careful:


click for larger view

gxh3 is loosing here, as black has a mate in 3 then! Instead sac (what else?) Nf7! (Rxf7 Qd8+ and white will eliminate more black material soon) and now nothing helps against Qxa6, e.g. Bxc5 Qxa6 Rxf7 Qxb5+ Ke6 gxh3

I finish here. I conclude I am not insane enough for this style of play.

Aug-05-07  JG27Pyth: It's really very simple: I don't understand the puzzle, I don't understand the solution, and I don't understand the game.
Aug-05-07  euripides: Gufeld in 'the search for Mona Lisa' says of 20.Rxf5, 'I think that Chigorin would have been satisfied with this sacrifice, based not on calculation but rather on intuition and inspiration'. So he didn't see the whole thing to the end himself. I guess the heart of the intuition might be that Black is very tied up and short of good moves after 22.c5, but to sac a rook on that basis shows tremendous nerve.

He also says 30.c7 is refuted by 30.0-0, but during the game he had to check his unfortunately illegible scoresheet to see whether Black had moved his king.

Aug-05-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: This, for the first time, is the 8th day in a row I've solved the puzzle. Question: If I'm getting so smart, how come I'm not winning OTB? Meanwhile, after Black's 21...h5, why not 22.Nf6+? That'd make things pretty lively. Black has to play Bxf6, White answers Bxf6, and the Black Queen is pinned in front of the h8 Rook. Although 22.c5 is probably safer for White, I admit...
Aug-05-07  Defrogger: <playground player: ...Meanwhile, after Black's 21...h5, why not 22.Nf6+? That'd make things pretty lively. Black has to play Bxf6, White answers Bxf6, and the Black Queen is pinned in front of the h8 Rook.> So you propose, 21... h5 22. Nf6+ Bxf6 23. Bxf6... Now how about 23... Qf7 (then if 24. Bxh8 Qxf5 regaining the Rook and protecting the h5 pawn)
Aug-05-07  Timex: A beautiful puzzle which involves a rook sac to blow open the position...

<playground player> Solving puzzles doesn't necessarily make you better at OTB does it?

Aug-05-07  Fezzik: I got stuck after I saw Black's 21...h5. I couldn't find a way to justify losing a Rook for two pawns with a meager attack. Congratulations to GM Gufeld (RIP) and anyone who did solve this!
Aug-05-07  zoren: you have to consider whether or not youd make these kinds of moves otb to make you better player. if you chicken out at your own calculations otb you can solve millions and still be a poor player because you lack confidence.
Aug-05-07  Fezzik: Zoren suggests that we have to be able to sacrifice rooks over the board even if we can't justify them.

The difference between an amateur and a Grandmaster is that the GM does work out when these sacrifices work. An amateur <hopes> the sacrifices work.

Many of these amateurs will take solace from a game lost because they sacrificed the piece and some computer program later proved they were right.

If you sacrifice material but can't justify it in your own analysis, it's not a sacrifice. It's a blunder.

In this specific case, White had nothing better, but had been planning this sac probably before he played 16.f4.

Aug-06-07  tallinn: <fezzik> See <euripides> comment and for another example of winning "blunders" in your sense read Kasparovs own comments on his immortal game against Topalov, especially the comment on the brilliant move 24. Rxd4!!: "When I made this move, I saw only the repetition of the moves and the opportunity to continue the attack, though the whole picture of the combination was not yet clear."

http://web.comhem.se/talschess/cent...

Aug-06-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A famous quote by Mike Stivik (often defeated by friend Stewart in chess):admit defeat-EAT!

In the end of this one,black's king was open to white's queen and bishops,while his own pieces are quiesient.

Sep-11-07  jmrulez2004: actually... it is not right to say that gufeld just went by bingo. It was a carefully planned startegy to attack the king. Yes he must not have calculated all the way to Move 34. BUT THE BASIC PRINCIPLE in this game is that he was relying on this factors and were basically playing the whole game based on this idea. He was sure that he could break through the defenses These factors are:
1. The pin by the queen on move 14
2.the ownership of the dark squares by the bishop since move 15 3. the weak pawn structure which will crack soon on the e-file 4. the compressed position of his oponent.
5.the potential activity ofthe light square bishop especially h5-e8 6.and yes..l the whole thing and everything was made possible by the move. ....14.f5 so for many of us..where we will retreat our knight due to capture..and fail to realise the attacking options that have just flared open due to that move.
Sep-11-07  jmrulez2004: actually... it is not right to say that gufeld just went by bingo. It was a carefully planned startegy to attack the king. Yes he must not have calculated all the way to Move 34. BUT THE BASIC PRINCIPLE in this game is that he was relying on this factors and were basically playing the whole game based on this idea. He was sure that he could break through the defenses These factors are: 1. The pin by the queen on move 14
2.the ownership of the dark squares by the bishop since move 15 3. the weak pawn structure which will crack soon on the e-file 4. the compressed position of his oponent.
5.the potential activity ofthe light square bishop especially h5-e8 6.and yes..l the whole thing and everything was made possible by the move. ....

14.f5

so for many of us..where we will retreat our knight due to capture..and fail to realise the attacking options that have just flared open due to that move.

Aug-04-10  sevenseaman:


click for larger view

Here Black resigns in view of ..34.Kf8, (the only logical option) 35.Bh6+, Rxh6 36.Qg8#

There are many superfluous comments but it is good people find the truth in their own pretty ways.

Feb-10-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: This a pretty good game.
Jun-28-11  JoergWalter: On youtube there is a video where Gufeld presents this diamond studded game. It is big fun to watch a very temperamentful Gufeld and his management of the english language. Highly recommended
Jun-28-11  sevenseaman: Its really a ballet! Eduard Gufeld will never die for the chess world.
Jul-12-15  FairyPromotion: Gufled was a true artist. Even though this game will always remain under the shadow of the Mona Lisa, it is an exceptional game. I have heard it being called <The Pearl of Sochi>. Nice choice for PotD.
Jul-12-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Sigh. Is it Monday yet?
Jul-12-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  jith1207: The puzzle position looked like all covered up but if you see the end position, it gives a resemblance that Black's King got stripped wide naked. Ok, enough of artistry, Is it Monday yet?
Jul-12-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  jith1207: ..And that end position where White has only a Queen and a Bishop while Black has 3 major pieces only to get the bare naked King checkmated. Looking at the old comments, it looks like the Rook's moves were clear but after h5 preventing Bh5#, White really moves every other piece poetically and precisely to bring down the fortress. These moves are hard to find, though they are Very simplistic and necessary moves.
Jul-12-15  mel gibson: Great game -
DR4 64 bit agrees with the solution.

It's a perfect example of what happens when you don't castle your King.

Jul-12-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  diagonalley: rook sacrifice *14* moves before the end!? ... a leap of faith shurely!? ... agree with <An Englishman> ... (double sigh)
Jul-12-15  saturn2: 20 Rxf5 gxf5 21 Bh5+ Kf8 22 Rxf5+
a:if Black interposes a piece he looses it, since it is attacked 3 times and defended only 2 times b: if 22...Kg8 23 Rf7 and the black Queen gets trouble.
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