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Jacques Mieses vs Marcus Kann
Hamburg (1885)  ·  Caro-Kann Defense: Advance Variation (B12)  ·  0-1
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sac: 13...Ncxd4 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Dec-19-15  morfishine: <sfm> "seriously ingenious" describing 13...Nxd4 is a sloppy, gushing over statement; Today's puzzle has to be a mistake, referencing difficulty, as others have noted


Dec-19-15  Ratt Boy: This was way easy for a Saturday, at least from my perspective. That's probably because I was the victim of a very similar tactic in a team tourney in Columbus, OH, many many moon ago. As in this game, I was a piece up and my opponent used the diagonal pin to pick up a rook. D'oh! The tactic has been seared into my brain.
Premium Chessgames Member
  NM JRousselle: As others have said, this is quite easy for a Saturday. So for those who want a tough puzzle, here is one:

White Ke6, Rg2
Black Ke3, pe4

White to move

Dec-19-15  wooden nickel: <The pin is mightier than the sword. - Reinfeld>... but here only because the king can't get out of it, in a slighty modified position he could: (note the h pawn is changed from h2 to h3!)

click for larger view

now the king could simply escape to h2!

Dec-19-15  Marmot PFL: Almost a beginner tactics puzzle. Once you find the idea it's over.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: This one is designed to undermine your Saturday confidence...'What am I missing?".

Surely C.G. would not resort to such psychology.

Black can play the intermezzo with a check!, after that there are no more cute moves to find, no traps to avoid.

A position in this game.

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Reminds me of this game.

A Espeli vs Andersen, 1952

Final position:

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Which too came from a Caro Kann which will please Corndog2 as he advises us we should 'Think again!' about the Caro Kann being solid and a drawish opening.

Unless of course you are familiar with the famous game.:

John Beckman - Tristan Stevens, Adelaide 2003.

Which was a Scandinavian and reached this position

click for larger view

After 6 white moves whereas in the Mieses-Kann game it only took 5 moves.

1. e4 d5 2. e5 Bf5 3. d4 e6 4. Bb5+ c6 5. Bd3 Bxd3 6. Qxd3

Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: < NM JRousselle: As others have said, this is quite easy for a Saturday. So for those who want a tough puzzle, here is one:

White Ke6, Rg2
Black Ke3, pe4

White to move >

For those who want a diagram:

White to move

click for larger view

Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Today's Saturday solution 17...Rc1! combines several tactical themes with one simple devastating sham sacrifice:

1. Overworked piece: The White Rook on d1 is overworked as it cannot simultaneously defend the Queen, the King or itself.

2. Pin: Both the Queen on d4 and the Rook on d1 are simultaneously pinned by their counterparts (i.e. Queen pins Queen and Rook pins Rook).

3. Deflection: Deflection or removing the Guard is involved, as for example after 17...Rc1 18. Nc3 Rxa1 .

For an improvement for White, <sfm>'s 15. Kh1 to is the best move in a bad position. However, with strong play 15. Kh1 Bxd4 (-2.12 @ 23 depth, Deep Fritz 14) likely leads to a won endgame for Black. Even so, 15. Kh1 is better than 15. Rd1? because 15. Kh1 is a practical defensive move which puts up much more resistance.

Another better defensive try for White is 13. Rc1, when Black has to find 13...Kd7! to secure an advantage. After 13. Rc1 13...Kd7!, play might continue 14. Nc3 Nfxd4 15. Kh1 Nxf3 16. Qxf3 Kc7! (-0.88 @ 22 depth, Deep Fritz 14) when the extra pawn gives Black an edge.

Earlier in the opening, instead of 9. 0-0, I prefer 9. dxc5 which facilitated a White victory and a tournament win in A Rabinovich vs Alekhine, 1911.

Even earlier in the opening, instead of 3. e5, I prefer the slightly more popular 3. Nc3 as in Carlsen vs S Ernst, 2004.

Dec-19-15  dnp: Christmas comes early from chessgames, an easy Friday, even easier Saturday.
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A very EASY Saturday! Rc1 was as brilliant as it was simple. The lingering aftershock was the pin on knight which PINNED down both knight AND rook.
Premium Chessgames Member
  varishnakov: Mieses pieces
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tiggler: Tuesday's puzzle B Kienboeck vs D Dardha, 2015 Was the only one I missed so far this week.
Dec-19-15  OscarR: <Penguincw>

1 Kf4

click for larger view

If 1 ... Kd4, 2 Rg4 (Black loses pawn)
If 1 ... Kd3, 2 Kf4 (Black loses pawn)

1 ... Kf3
2 Rh2

click for larger view

If 2 ... Ke3, 3 Rh4 (Black loses pawn)
If 2 ... Kg3, 3 Re2 (Black loses pawn)

2 ... e3
3 Rh3+

click for larger view

If 3 ... Kg2 (Black loses pawn)
If 3 ... Ke2, 4 Ke4 (Black loses pawn)

3 ... Kf2
4 Kf4

click for larger view

If 4 ... Kg2/Kg1/Kf1/Ke2/Ke1 (Black loses pawn)

4 ... e2
5 Rh2+

click for larger view

If 5 ... Kg1 (Black loses pawn)
If 5 ... Kf1, 6 Kf3 (Black loses pawn, or is checkmated after pawn promotion)

If 5 ... Ke1, 6 Ke3 (Black loses pawn)


Dec-19-15  OscarR: <Penguincw>

Oops! Forgot about the possible knight promotion in 5 ... Kf1 6 Kf3 e1N+

click for larger view

Probably a tablebase win for White, but quite beyond my powers!

Dec-19-15  Marmot PFL: <Penguincw> Instructive rook ending. several moves lead to R vs N.
Dec-19-15  dfcx: I can't believe it's Saturday!

White's queen is pinned and only protected by the rook.

This indicates an attack on the rook:


A. 18.Qxb6 Rxd1+ 19.Kf2 axb6 wins a rook

B. 18.Rxc1 Qxd4+ gets a queen for the rook.

C. 18.Nc3 Rxa1

D. 18.Kf2 Rxd1

E. 18.Kf1 Qxd4

Thanks CG for the nice Christmas present.

Dec-19-15  PJs Studio: Move ...13 black to play and win. 17...Rc1 is lovely though.
Dec-19-15  cunctatorg: This is an elementary exercise position for pins and related topics; as scholes pointed out, the true Saturday exercise is to be found in Black's 13th...

By the way 17... Rc1! 18. Rxc1?? Qxd4 gets one full queen, a knight and a rook for just two rooks; 19. Kf1 Qxa1 20. Rc8 Kd7 21. Rxh8 Qxb1

Dec-19-15  Moszkowski012273: Laaaaaaaame....
Dec-19-15  Sniffles: Not finding this a hard puzzle at all. 15. Rd1 is beating a dead horse. No plan to get the queen or king off the diagonal. Even my weak brain could figure the inevitable chain of events from there.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pedro Fernandez: I have not yet think at all about this puzzle.

click for larger view

However I see 17...Qxb3 aiming to the white rook on d1-square, so that 18.Qxa7 is not possible. On the other hand if 1) 18.Rd3 then 18...Rc1+, and if 2) 18.Qd3 then 18...Qxd3 (18...Qb2 19.Qd4 Qxd4 20.Rxd4 Rc1+) 19.Rxd3 Rc1+ with advantage.

Premium Chessgames Member
  Sularus: weak back rank... Rc1+!
Dec-19-15  CHESSTTCAMPS: I didn't get to look at this until late in the day, but it was quickly obvious that the pin on white's queen sets up a quick turnaround shot for black, who is temporarily a piece down:

17... Rc1!! is a deadly double pin that overburdens both the queen and rook.

A.18.Qxb6 Rxc1+ 19.Kf2 axb6 and white will also lose the pinned knight after Kd7-Rh1-Rh8c8-R8c1

B.18.Rxc1 Qxd4+ 19.Kf1 Qxa1 wins

C.18.Qf2 Rxd1#

D.18.Qe3/c5 QxQ+ wins

E.18.K moves Qxd4(+) followed by Qxa1 wins

F.18.other Qxd4+ wins

Dec-19-15  CHESSTTCAMPS: Sloppy write-up - I saw, but failed to specify the game continuation, which is similar to A.
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: S Madsen vs M Napolitano, 1950 has a similar overload theme.
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