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Isaac Boleslavsky vs Anatoly Ufimtsev
"g2, Joy of Man's Desiring" (game of the day Mar-08-2014)
Omsk (1944)
French Defense: Rubinstein Variation (C10)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 4 times; par: 34 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-26-06  soberknight: I'm surprised nobody has noticed this game yet. I found it in Fred Reinfeld's book "Chess by Yourself" - one of the worst chess books I have ever seen, but it contains 10 good games. Black's queen sac with 20...Rhg8 is outstanding. White's key mistake was 9.Bc4-b3 instead of Bxa6 or Qe2.
Oct-27-06  syracrophy: <soberknight> You should also see the great games (with the French): O Tenner vs Carlos Torre, 1924 H Jennings vs Carlos Torre, 1924 and Samuels vs Carlos Torre, 1924

No one has kibitzed on them yet! Check them out! Great games! Especially O Tenner vs Carlos Torre, 1924, you'll love 24...♖xg3!! of this game!

Apr-24-09  DWINS: Fantastic game! Ufimtsev leaves his queen en prise for five consecutive moves.

According to Chernev, Ufimtsev was not even a master at the time of this game, but was a "first-category" player.

Jun-17-11  Dr. J: If 21 g3 the main variation is 21...Nxg3 22 hxg3 Rxg3+ 23 fxg3 Qxe3+ 24 Kh1 Qh6+ 25 Kg2 Rxg3+ 26 Kf2 Rg2+ and mate follows.

Times change: this is truly a glorious combination, but nowadays Crafty finds it in just a few seconds.

Jul-22-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: Strange coincidence - the matrix 21. ... Rxg2+! plus 22. ... Nd2 has been applied 67 years later in Hamburg/Germany once more again, please compare A Ertelt vs R Gralla, 2011 ... on the occasion of the second coming the dance has started with Black 14. ... Nd2! and only then Black 15. ... Rxg2+!, however ...
Aug-07-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Nightsurfer: This game here <I Boleslavsky vs A Ufimtsev, Omsk 1944> demonstrates that a Black assault by the tank weapon - being supported by Black Bishop b7 that controls the White-squared diagonal a8/h1 - via the left wing can shatter the opponent's castle on the right wing of White army.

And the volatile square is g2 - here, in <I Boleslavsky vs A Ufimtsev, Omsk 1944> it is a Rook that crashes in there, but under different circumstances it can be a Bishop as well: R Rajkovic vs R Gralla, 2006 !

Dec-12-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Deflection.
Jan-21-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli:


click for larger view

20...Rag8! 21.Ne1 (if 21.g3 I am pretty sure that the continuation is 21...Nxg3 22.hxg3 Rxg3+ 23.fxg3 Qxe3+ and Black wins--I didn't check with the computer, but moved the pieces around).


click for larger view

...Rxg2+! 22.Nxg2 Nd2!


click for larger view

(if 23.f3 Qxe3+ 24.Rf2 Bxh2+!)

Black wins.

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: If you've never seen this game, you are in for a treat. It's a jaw-dropper.

Just to get the pun out of the way, it's based on the English title of a portion of a cantata by J. S. Bach, <Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring>. And, boy oh boy, Black desired the g2 square in this game!

(Yes, it's one of mine.)

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: A Jesus pun at the start of Lent. Is it a coincidence that <Nightsurfer> mentioned Him earlier?
Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: A great pun, and no doubt very appropriate for the beginning of Lent.
Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: Best pun I've seen since I've been visiting this site. Well played!!!
Mar-08-14  Jamboree: Right up until the end, white had an extremely interesting near-brilliancy drawing line that just BARELY fails.

Instead of the immediately losing 26. Bf3?, white should have tried 26. dxe6!?

If black casually plays the obvious reply 26. ... fxe6, white had 27. Bb3!, which ALMOST leads to a theoretically drawn (and almost unique) endgame after 27. ... Bxh2+ 28. Kxh2 Qxf1 29. Bxe6+ Kd8 30. Bxg8 Qxf2.

Now, in this interesting position, if white can just get rid of that pawn on a7, he can set up a crazy impenetrable fortress with the three minor piece vs. the Queen and two disconnected pawns. And it looks at first that white can indeed win that h7 pawn with 31. Be3! -- and there's no way it can be defended!

But black has one final brilliancy to save the win with 31. ... Qc2!, because now 32. Bxa7? loses to 32. ... Qc7+, winning the bishop and the game.

If white therefore DOESN'T take the a7 pawn, eventually black will push it, force white to sac a bishop to stop it, and then eventually win the Q+P v. two minor pieces endgame.

Close, but no cigar!

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Deep pun and exciting game!
Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Sure, its an acceptable pun if one has an encyclopedic memory of classical music composers. However, coming out of the gate, this excludes 99% of the World's population

Over the years, I've gone to great lengths to collect the works of Vivaldi and Mozart (whom I consider the greatest classical composers, if for nothing else, listening quality).

IMHO, Vivaldi is untouched, even by Mozart, in his piece arrangements focusing on concertos and sonatas.

Mozart is a fascinating study in that his symphonies (41 authenticated) seem to emulate a blueprint of his life. While Symphonies 1-15 reflect a youthful, bubbily individual, full of life and hope, symphonies 16-29 are full of fire and energy. Finally, we see a more dour side in symphonies 30-41.

However, in my case, if the discussion drifts into Beethoven, Chopin, Haydn, Strauss, or Bach (or any of the other greats), I'm like a fish out of water

Fascinating game though, especially as noted by <Dr. J> 21.g3 fails to 21...Nxg3 22.hxg3 Rxg3+ 23.fxg3 Qxe3+ 24.Kh1 Qh6+ 25.Kg2 Rxg3+ 26.Kf2 Rg2+ 27.Ke1 Bg3+ 28.Rf2 Qh1+ 29.Ke2 Rxf2+ 30.Ke3 Rxf3+ 31.Bxf3 Qxf3+

*****

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Jamboree: Right up until the end, white had an extremely interesting near-brilliancy drawing line that just BARELY fails. Instead of the immediately losing 26. Bf3?, white should have tried 26. dxe6!?

If black casually plays the obvious reply 26. ... fxe6, white had 27. Bb3!, which ALMOST leads to a theoretically drawn (and almost unique) endgame after 27. ... Bxh2+ 28. Kxh2 Qxf1 29. Bxe6+ Kd8 30. Bxg8 Qxf2.>

Nice try, but 26...Qe5! 27.f4 Qd4+ 28.Rf2 Bc5 29.Be1 Qxd1 wins the house.

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheAlchemist: A great pun for a great game.
Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: A close relative of "Etude in g7."

Ivanchuk vs Shirov, 1996

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: <Phony Benoni: If you've never seen this game, you are in for a treat. It's a jaw-dropper.

Just to get the pun out of the way, it's based on the English title of a portion of a cantata by J. S. Bach, <Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring>. And, boy oh boy, Black desired the g2 square in this game!

(Yes, it's one of mine.)>

Nicely done. FYI, from Wikipedia, "Apollo 100 was a short-lived British instrumental studio-based group that had a hit with the Johann Sebastian Bach-inspired single "Joy" in 1972.

The recording of "Joy" as performed by Apollo 100 is a nearly note-for-note remake of the arrangement of <Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring> (but with modern pop music flourishes like percussion and bass)..."

Here it is on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ekQ...

Mar-08-14  ivansoto: The question I find most interesting is how these two talented players found the opportunity to indulge their frivolity while a murderous war was raging between the Soviet Union and Germany (1944). And even given that they did, that the record of the game was preserved.
Mar-08-14  Captain Hindsight: [spoiler alert] <ivansoto: ...>
Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <ivansoto> It is rumored that some frivolous Russians took walks, sang, and even had sex during the Great Patriotic War.

To answer your question a little less frivolously, chess in the USSR seems to have mostly shut down until 1943, when it became clear the Soviets were winning the war. They didn't have a championship until 1944, though.

I was surprised to learn that there was a Moscow championship in November 1942. If they had one in November 1941 that would really be something. If anyone knows of serious chess in the USSR after the invasion and before 1943, I'd be curious to hear about it.

Mar-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Black will gain a rook to have rook + queen vs 3 minor pieces.
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