chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
David Bronstein vs Vladimir Simagin
Moscow-ch playoff (1947), Moscow URS
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Modern Steinitz Defense (C75)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 4 times; par: 47 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 16 more Bronstein/Simagin games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Premium members can see a list of all games that they have seen recently at their Game History Page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-25-09  WhiteRook48: 18...Bxc1 LOL!
Jun-25-09  Shams: <WhiteRook48> Strange move to criticize; black's DSB will hardly stand better than its counterpart if he retreats.

Bronstein's play of bishop against knight is lovely. Moves 24-29 are very strong.

Jun-11-10  Ulhumbrus: Here is a part of Bronstein's comments, from his book "200 open games":

<This is one of my most successful attempts at the difficult art of positional play. Simagin could not fathom the meaning of h4, and his King fell victim to a pawn breakthrough.

The subtlety of 29 e6 comes out in the variation 29...axb3 30 e7 Re8 31 Rd8 bxa7 32 Rxe8+ Kh7 33 Rh8+ Kxh8 34 e7-s8/Q+ Kh7 35 Qe1 Nd5 36 Qa1 Nb4, where Black is a Queen down, but in exchange has a strong pawn on a2.

White is saved by his own pawn on c5, which prevents the Black Knight from getting pawn support: by the march K-f2-e2-d3-c3 the white King will tip the balance in his favour. There is also a simpler solution: 33 Rd8! a2-a1/Q+ 34 Kh2 Qe1 35 e7-e8/Q Qxh4+ 36 Kg1.

There are probably many other compliated variations hidden in the position after 24 f4. I would like to draw the reader's attention to the importance of the open file for the Rook, be it either the f file or the d file >

So what does White gain by playing the move 23 h4?

To begin with, after 25 e5 White has a double potential threat of Rd7 and Rxf4 eg 25...Rxd1 26 Rxd1 threatening 27 Rd7 or 25...Rd6-d8 26 Rxd8 Rxd8 27 Rxf4.

Now suppose that White attempts to start his pawn breakthrough by playing 23 f4 and 24 e5 at once, without the preparatory move 23 h4.

After 23 f4 exf4 24 e5 White threatens to attack the f7 pawn by 25 Rxd8 Rxd8 26 Rxf4 but the difference is that now Black has the move 24...g5 defending the f4 pawn and obstructing White's attack on the f file.

Jun-12-10  Ulhumbrus: Here is a part of Bronstein's comments, from his book "200 open games": <This is one of my most successful attempts at the difficult art of positional play. Simagin could not fathom the meaning of h4, and his King fell victim to a pawn breakthrough.

The subtlety of 29 e6 comes out in the variation 29...axb3 30 e7 Re8 31 Rd8 bxa7 32 Rxe8+ Kh7 33 Rh8+ Kxh8 34 e7-s8/Q+ Kh7 35 Qe1 Nd5 36 Qa1 Nb4, where Black is a Queen down, but in exchange has a strong pawn on a2.

White is saved by his own pawn on c5, which prevents the Black Knight from getting pawn support: by the march K-f2-e2-d2-c3 the white King will tip the balance in his favour. There is also a simpler solution: 33 Rd8! a2-a1/Q+ 34 Kh2 Qe1 35 e7-e8/Q Qxh4+ 36 Kg1.

There are probably many other complicated variations hidden in the position after 24 f4. I would like to draw the reader's attention to the importance of the open file for the Rook, be it either the f file or the d file >

So what does White gain by playing the move 23 h4?

To begin with, after 25 e5 White has a double potential threat of Rd7 and Rxf4 eg 25...Rxd1 26 Rxd1 threatening 27 Rd7 or 25...Rd6-d8 26 Rxd8 Rxd8 27 Rxf4.

Now suppose that White attempts to start his pawn breakthrough by playing 23 f4 and 24 e5 at once, without the preparatory move 23 h4.

After 23 f4 exf4 24 e5 White threatens to attack the f7 pawn by 25 Rxd8 Rxd8 26 Rxf4 but the difference is that now Black has the move 24...g5 defending the f4 pawn and obstructing White's attack on the f file.

Apr-17-14  tranquilsimplicity: I suspect that a great part of Simagin's strategy was to deprive Bronstein of his Queen rather early. But as clearly demonstrated, Bronstein's attacking nature and prowess remained undimmed! #
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collection [what is this?]
Bronstein:"Simagin falls victim to a pawn breakthough"
from Ulhumbrus' favorite games by Ulhumbrus


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC