chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Viswanathan Anand vs Alexander Morozevich
Morelia-Linares (2007), Morelia MEX, rd 4, Feb-21
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Breyer Defense Zaitsev Hybrid (C95)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 18 times; par: 79 [what's this?]

explore this opening
find similar games 42 more Anand/Morozevich games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: The tournament is found above the game. For the newest chess events, this information may be a link which takes you to the tournament page which includes other games, a crosstable, discussion, etc.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-22-07  thathwamasi: First...What a wonderful Game. Way to go Anand...win Linares, Mtel and every damn thing that comes your way.
Feb-22-07  Ulhumbrus: First impressions: Morozevich does not prevent Nf5 by 14..g6 whereupon Anand plays Nf5. 16 dxe5 relinquishes White's advantage in space. 17 Nh2 takes a step towards Ng4. 21 Bxf6 concedes the bishop pair. 25 Nd5 offers a N on f5.
Feb-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: I guess to take the Knight would be suicidal. After 25...gxf5 26.exf5 Rh6 27.Qg3+ Kh8 (27...Bg7 28.f6 is out of any consideration) 28.Qxe5+ black is in big troubles. 28...Kg8 loses outright after simple 29.Rd4 with next Rg4. After 28...f6 29.Nxf6 Bg7 30.Qxc5 Rxf6 31.Rd7 the game seems to be over as well. 28...Bg7 seems to be the best option of black but after 29.f6 Bf8 30.Ne7 Nd3 (30...Ne6 31.Rd7) 31.Bxd3 cxd3 32.Rxd3 white has 4 Pawns for piece and overwhelming positional advantage.
Feb-22-07  outplayer: <Honza Cervenka> Good job, man!
Feb-22-07  artemis: As far as the opening explorer is concerned, the first deviation occured on move 14 with 14. ... c6. This is a Korchnoi-esque move, inviting his opponent into a brawl, using his king as bait. It's benefits are more subtle than the drawbacks: it allows the queen c7 (and therefore it allows the rooks to communicate), it threatens to advance d6-d5 at some point, and it needs a very energetic refutation. 15. Nf5 is a very energetic move, that seems to be accurate (I dont have much time now, so These are just general ideas). Black generally wants to open up the center with a d5 pawn thrust, but it appears to me that here it would just allow white's bishops free reign of the board. dxe5! looks very strong from Anand. Now that the black queen has placed herself on c7, Anand opens the center. while it does give up that beautiful pawn structure that white generally likes so much in these structures, it seems to have given white full control of the initiative. The black queen on c7 does not seem to be doing much. Trying to take back on e5 with a piece, inorder to achieve d6-d5 looks like it is simply a bad idea, since white would get to play, Nxe5 and f2-f4, regaining control of the e5 square, so that if d6-d5 comes later, e4-e5 can be played, forcing a pawn wedge down black's center, and placing the c6 and d5 pawns infront of the bishop. 25. Nd5!! is an inspired move. I dont have time for the rest now, but this game deserves some serious analysis.
Feb-22-07  Marmot PFL: Good ending by Anand. Moro was defending well until just before time control, when he doesn't make any big mistakes, just a few small ones but that is enough. Looks like he could play 35...Ba6 or Bc6 to meet Ra5 with Nb7. After 35...h6 36.Ra5 he doesn't have time as the threats of Nb4 or Nxc4 are too strong. Once b5 falls c4 is next and from there its easy with Anand's technique.
Feb-22-07  you vs yourself: After 28.Qf3, Seirwan(commenting on playchess) liked black's position. 31.g4 gave black the advantage. But Moro was under huge time pressure. With only 3 mins left, he made a mistake by playing 34..Nc5(correct was Nc7). Starting from 36.Ra5, Anand played with deadly accuracy and won.
Feb-22-07  thathwamasi: what would happen if black takes the Knight on f5 on the 25th move. Could someone please enlighten me on the continuation
Feb-22-07  yalie: cant understand 31..qh4 at all. that queen on d8 was beautiful. as a patzer, I would have played 31..bh6 attacking the knight which supports the other knight. But what do I know?
Feb-22-07  Ulhumbrus: <Honza Cervenka: I guess to take the Knight would be suicidal. After 25...gxf5 26.exf5 Rh6 27.Qg3+ Kh8 (27...Bg7 28.f6 is out of any consideration) 28.Qxe5+ black is in big troubles. 28...Kg8 loses outright after simple 29.Rd4 with next Rg4. After 28...f6 29.Nxf6 Bg7 30.Qxc5 Rxf6 31.Rd7 the game seems to be over as well. 28...Bg7 seems to be the best option of black but after 29.f6 Bf8 30.Ne7 Nd3 (30...Ne6 31.Rd7) 31.Bxd3 cxd3 32.Rxd3 white has 4 Pawns for piece and overwhelming positional advantage.> Here are a few variations. On 25...gxf5 25 exf5 Rh6 27 Qg3+ Kh8 28 Qe5+ f6 29 Nxf6 Bg7 30 Qxc5 Rxf6 31 Rd7 Bc6 32 Rxg7 Kxg7 33 Re7+ Kg8 34 Qe5 Rf7 35 Rxf7 Kxf7 36 Qe6+ Kg8 37 Qxc6 Re8 38 g4 looks like a win. On 25...gxf5 25 exf5 Rh6 27 Qg3+ Kh8 28 Qe5+ Bg7 29 f6 Bf8 30 Ne7 Ne6 31 Rd7 Qb6 32 Qg3 Rg6 33 Nxg6+ hxg6 34 Qh4+ Kg8 35 Bxg6! fxg6 36 Qh7 is mate. On 25...gxf5 25 exf5 Rh6 27 Qg3+ Kh8 28 Qe5+ Bg7 29 f6 Bf8 30 Ne7 Nd3 31 Qg3 Rg6 32 Nxg6+ hxg6 33 Qh4+ Kg8 34 Bxd3 cxd3 35 Rxd3 threatens Rh3 and on 35...Bc8 36 Re8 threatens 37 Rxf8+!Kxf8 38 Qh8 mate. Then on 36...Bf5 37 Rxf8+! Rxf8 38 Qh6 wins.
Feb-23-07  Marmot PFL: Generally most GMs won't even calculate those variations if they have other good moves. If a player like Anand gives a piece for "free" the price is usually too high.
Feb-23-07  Hesam7: 31...Bh6! suggested by Anand is very strong. Black ends up a healthy pawn up:


click for larger view

From the above diagram Fruit @ depth 19 gives:

32.Qg3 Bxe3 33.Qxe3 Nxe4 34.Bxe4 Bxd5 35.Rd2 Bxe4 36.Rxd6 Rxd6 37.Qxe4 Rd5 38.Ra1 Qd6 39.Ra8 Kg7 40.Re8 Rd2 41.Rxe5 Qf6 42.Qe1 Rxb2 43.Re7 (eval: -1.11).

32.Rf1 Kg7 33.Ra1 Bxe3 34.Qxe3 Nxe4 35.Bxe4 Bxd5 36.Bc2 f6 37.Rfd1 Kh8 38.Kh2 Kg8 39.Kg1 Bc6 40.Rxd6 Rxd6 41.Ra7 Rd7 42.Qc5 Rxa7 43.Qxa7 (eval: -1.15).

Mar-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Mateo: Moro outplayed Anand in the middlegame, even taking the advantage. The turning point was in Moro's time trouble the trade of Queens. After 33.. .Qd8, Black has a big edge: the Bishop pair and control on the Black squares, meanwhile White's Bishop has a very reduced scope. Then Anand play in the ending was very sound, just amazingly accurate. At this moment, he began to play like the chess monster he is at his best. Let's see why:

34...Nc5?! <The Knight is misplaced here for a tactical reason. After 34...f6, Black keeps an edge (Bishop pair and better pawn structure). The difference is that after 35.Ra5 Bc6, White has not Nxc4, like when the Knight is at c5.> 35. h4!? <35.Ra5 Bc6 36.Nxc4 bxc4 37.Rxc5 Bxd5 38.exd5 Rxd5 39.Rxc4 Rd2, with the opposite colour Bishops and counterplay for his Rooks, Black should draw. If 40.Rc1 Bh6. Anand wants more.> h6?! <35...Bc6 was better, defending against the threat Ra5, in order to be able to keep his two Bishops. The position would be balanced.> 36. Ra5 <Now Black must give up his Bishop pair.> Bc6? <The losing move. 36...Bxd5, followed by Rb7 was better.> 37. Nb4! <37.Nxc4 bxc4 38.Rxc5 Bxd5 39.exd5 Rxd5 40.Rxc4 Rd2 41.Rc1, White is a pawn up, but it is not clear there is a win because of the reduced material, the opposite colour Bishops, and the activity of Black Rook on the seventh rank. However there is a difference with the variation given above in White’s favour. After 41.Rc1, Black has no longer Bh6. Anyway, Anand saw something stronger.> Bxe4 38. Bxe4 Nxe4 39. Rxb5 Nd2 40. Kg2 e4 41. Re2 <White threatens to put a piece at d5. There is no defence. Then the Knight has to move, Black loses a pawn.> Bf8 42. Ned5 e3 43. Nxe3 <White wins.>

Nov-13-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <As far as the opening explorer is concerned, the first deviation occured on move 14 with 14. ... c6.>

According to chessbase database, 14...c6 has already been played in a Bundesliga game Volokitin-Bacrot in 2006, which this game actually followed up to 19.Bg5. Instead of Moro's 19...Re6, Bacrot played Qc6 and the game continued:

20.Rad1 h6 21.Bc1 Nc5 22.Bxh6 Nfxe4 [22...gxh6? 23.Rd6!] 23.Ng4 Re6 24.Be3 Rae8 25.Bxc5 Nxc5 26.Qg3 a5? [26...e4 was much better] 27.Rxe5! Nd3 [27...Rxe5 28.Nfh6+; relatively best is 27...Qxg2+, but White still remains an exchange up after 28.Qxg2 Bxg2 29.Rxe6 fxe6 30.Nfh6+! gxh6 31.Nf6+ and 32.Nxe8, or 30...Kh8 31.Bg6 Re7 32.Nf7+] 28.Bxd3 cxd3 29.Nd4 1-0

Nov-13-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Position after 28.Qf3:


click for larger view

A good opportunity missed here by Black was 28...f5! 29.exf5 Red6 and the pinned knight on d5 cannot be saved, though after 30.fxg6 hxg6 31.Qg4 Bxd5 32.Nxd5 Rxd5 33.Rxd5 Rxd5 34.Qxg6+/Bxg6 Bg7 White does have two pawns and a rather exposed black king for the piece.

Apr-07-12  PinnedPiece: GTM Score 94 Par 89....wow. Made some good guesses, and there were certainly some critical moments around move 28 that Anand made ...and I didn't!
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Passive sacrifice
from Destruction sacrifices by outplayer
Anand Grand
by fredthebear
Art of War's favorite games 4
by Art of War
anand ruylopez as white
by senankit
SG'favorite games
by sanojgali
Ananad vs morozevc
from руј зат by kafkafan
AdrianP's Bookmarked Games (2007)
by AdrianP


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC