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Viswanathan Anand vs Vladimir Kramnik
16th Amber Tournament (Rapid) (2007)  ·  Spanish Game: Closed Variations (C88)  ·  1/2-1/2
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-20-07  sheaf: actually i would like to correc myself here, the win is not difficult after u see it in diagrams but to reach there one has to go thru a lot of counterintutive moves which makes it hard to think about it, it would have been great if anand had found the win.. great defense by kramnik who i thought chose very natural continuation...
Mar-20-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Reisswolf: It's time already! Give these two guys a 16-game classical match. Let them go at each other in this manner.

It seems that there is something about Anand and Kramnik that causes them to play great chess against each other.

Mar-20-07  KamikazeAttack: Damn what a game. After 29. Rg2, Anand would have believed this was a sure win. I would have resigned as black.

Great play by both players. So imaginative. That attack was evil. How did Kramnik find a defence?

Mar-20-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Softpaw: <slomarko: Kramnik was a full rook up but managed only to draw.>

LOL

Mar-20-07  Kangaroo: I suspect that <21 ... Ng5> instead of the centralizing move <21 ... Rad8> would be a much safer way for Black. The threat <Ng5-f3+> leaves only two visible choices for White. [A] <22. Qg2> which moves the white queen, the main attacking force, back to the camp. Or [B] <22. Bxg5 Qxg5> keeping the dynamic balance (unless I have overlooked something).

Had Kramnik selected such a strategic way, we would not have seen the exciting final part of the game.

Mar-21-07  setebos: Tendulkar vs Shakespeare was the best match in the ICC 7 years ago.Tendulkar was Svidler, Shakespeare was a mystery.(Rumored to be Kramnik) Anyway log on and see their games at 4-0. They are not inferior this one.(the best ones of course :) )
Mar-21-07  Plato: <setebos> I am no longer a member on ICC. Do you know who had the better score in their blitz games, overall? Thanks.
Mar-21-07  Atking: I'm blindfolded too but I think that the obvious 24. ...NxNf5 25.gxNf5 Bc8 with c6~d5 may draw without much difficulty (On 26.Qg3 d5! 27.Bxd5 Bxf5 (Eventually 27. ...RxBd5!?)). I could miss something therefore my impression is Kramnik enjoyed himself in the dangerous test line of 24. ...Nc2?!
Mar-21-07  gauer: Kramnik vs ratings list #1 Anand would sure make an interesting W. Ch. match, should FIDE allow a bout. These recent Spanishes & Bogo-Catalans would sure make for a more exciting repertoire test than those Slavs seen in the last cycle. It's surprising he's only now starting to play good chess in his late 30s, and one could wonder Kramnik's youth is advantageous or not.
Mar-21-07  KamikazeAttack: <Kramnik vs ratings list #1 Anand would sure make an interesting W. Ch. match, should FIDE allow a bout. These recent Spanishes & Bogo-Catalans would sure make for a more exciting repertoire test than those Slavs seen in the last cycle. It's surprising he's only now starting to play good chess in his late 30s, and one could wonder Kramnik's youth is advantageous or not.>

This post is unclear.

Who is "only now starting to play good chess in his late 30s"? Kramnik or Anand?

Kramnik is no where near late 30s. And Anand who is, has always played more than good chess, excellent chess in fact.

Mar-21-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <marvol> good point, i was thinking more of games like this Anand vs Kramnik, 2002
or else this
Anand vs Kramnik, 2001

Here Anand is coming off a loss and wants more, and Kramnik more than meets him halfway. Nd4-c2xa1 looks way to risky against Anand when there is a safe alternative like Nxf5 and d5.

Mar-21-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: <acirce> Nice work. Someday I have to learn how to make those diagrams.
Mar-21-07  you vs yourself: <Marmot PFL> It's all explained here:FEN Help Page
Mar-22-07  gauer: As far as one-on-one match-play goes, and that Kramnik & FIDE have finally settled the W. Ch. title dispute, Kramnik's overall play seems strong, ever since his hiatus, during his arguably medically weaker years which Marmot quotes. Anand is also a sharp player (especially well-known for tournament scoring results in non-classical time-play), but isn't it a little late to only be currently peaking? Sonas could have a field day with this. Then again, it's too bad that W. Ch. play-offs weren't broken using a double-blind-fold formula, since the memory games have shown at least as much as strategic complexity as their quick-play, rapid counter-parts, IMO.
Mar-22-07  sanyas: <ughaibu> 35.Bg6 Bxg6 36.Qxg6 Kh8 37.h7 Qe1+ is a perpetual. Sorry, but I can't find any brilliancies for White here.
Mar-22-07  Valiantangel: Great game:)
Mar-22-07  sheaf: <gauer> ??!! ..blindfold is similar to blitz in some sense, moro losing to van wely the way he did can have no possible explaination. ur claim that anand peaking in late 30s is hilarious anand was 2795 in yr 1998 when he virtually won everything that came his way, in my opinion he was more creative faster and deadlier then than now, after that he played consistently at very high level for a long time only difference i see in him now is that he has matured now goes for more pragmatic play and avoids very unclear lines, just like kramnik. in some sense these players have got into mindest of playing sound games rather than creatives ones which has of course reduced the number of '? moves' they make but has decreased their creativity levels alongwith.
Mar-23-07  gauer: While Anand is at least as strong in tournament play, as far as number of overall top results go (it makes sense, as Anand is older...), Kramnik seems more likely than Anand to play according to the old version of the W. Ch. match-play formula (ie as Challenger, don't just draw, but instead also play to attempt to beat the Champ...): Kramnik lately seems to be playing many more unclear & Classical 1 e4 e5 lines (ie really giving the critical tests - long lines of the Russian System, Closed & Marshall Spanishes, sharp Slavs, etc - of the play for the full-point lines, with idea to minimize number of draws) than ever before. Kramnik's skills show that Anand's Spanish Torture is not as fearful as it looks, and with 5.5:6 in middle-game blind-fold play so far, he isn't dropping pieces each few moves, due to lack of sight of the board. In match-play & other top-level lately that Kramnik does play, a running blind result like this is a bit of a reminder of the Fischer years.
Mar-26-07  yalie: kramnik is playing unclear lines bcos he wants to hide his prep for Mexico. Remember he was playing the Najdorf before his match against Leko.

Kramnik is playing beautifully in blindfold. i agree with gauer that it seems like one move blunders are a thing of the past .. but you never know.

BTW, I was under the impression, Kramnik is a great match player .. I just realized that Kramnik has only won one match - against Kasparov in 2000. Other than that he drew with Leko (is he even a top 10 player anymore?), drew with Topalov (ok ok - I know about game 5), but Topa shd have been up 1.5-0.5 after two games, but gifted Kramnik 2 games. Also this was the non-cheating Topa (said in half jest) so I am not sure Kramnik's win has much merit. He lost to Shirov in the infamous candidates match.

where does he get his rep as a match player?

compare his match rep with that of Kasparov, Karpov or even Anand and it doesnt look too great.

Mar-27-07  gauer: He may not play many tournaments, but when he does,his tournament scores have had a history of earning strong chances for further match-play. During match-play, he does know exactly when to turn the heat on (and just when to maintain draws, relax and continue for a potentially favourable rapid-play play-off, for example - after game 5, his strategy really did appear to change to desiring to beat Topalov that way). Kramnik earned his W. Ch. title through a combination of both types of play, as well, as strong overall game-play vs much of the high-rated opposition. At times, it is favourable to only maintain a 1/2 point lead in the latter round of a tournament, rather than always play riskily for potentially costly full points. Anand tends to streak up and down like this in important tournaments, often being a point or so ahead of the nearest opps. But it's great to see Kramnik being ready to hold the running lead in less imprtant tournaments like Amber. If Kramnik can maintain these streak leads in regular tournaments as well, then Anand really needs to watch out for the strength of his play.
Mar-29-07  s4life: <KamikazeAttack: Damn what a game. After 29. Rg2, Anand would have believed this was a sure win. I would have resigned as black. Great play by both players. So imaginative. That attack was evil. How did Kramnik find a defence?>

You contradict yourself, he didn't find the right defense, as it usually happens the attacker (Anand) didn't find the winning line. It was a nice game from both though.

Mar-30-07  MadBishop: Great game! Why didn't Kramnik capture on g8 on the 43rd move?
Mar-31-07  djmercury: <Anyway log on and see their games at 4-0> Are these games still on Icc or somewhere else?
Aug-21-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karpova: <MadBishop: Great game! Why didn't Kramnik capture on g8 on the 43rd move?> His king was on g6, he had a DSB and a knight on a1 so he couldn't capture on g8 at move 43
Sep-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  notyetagm: <you vs yourself: Had Vishy found 32.g6, <notyetagm> would've run wild with his FENs;)>

True and LOL. :-)

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