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Maxim Sorokin vs Mikhail Ulibin
USSR 1986  ·  French Defense: Tarrasch. Closed Variation (C06)  ·  0-1
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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-16-10  tacticalmonster: 1) removal of defender: Remove the knight on f3 and it would be mate. If d4 pawn is gone, Both BN have access to e5 square

2) loose or hanging piece: Bd7, Bb5 , Ng5 and h3

3) underdefended pieces: f3 knight was insufficently defended. It was attacked twice and defended twice.

4) partial pin: Bb5 pinned the c6 Knight. But the Knight could still move despite dropping d7 bishop

5) exposed White king: WK missed the protection of g pawn

6) material: Black had N and 1 P for rook

7) out of play piece: f1 rook

candidate: 19 Nce5

a) 20 hxg4 Qxg4+ 21 Kh1 Nxf3 22 Rxf3 Rxf3

b1) 20 dxe5 Bxb5 21 hxg4 Qxg4+ 22 Kh2 Bxf1 23 Qxf1 Rxf3 24 Rxf3 Qxf3 Black is up two pawns plus attacking chance against White king

b2) 21 Re1 Nxf2!! 22 Kxf2 Qh2+ 23 Ke3 Qf4+ 24 Kf2 d4! 25 Rd3 Qh2+ 26 Kf1 Qg3! heavy loss of material for White

May-16-10  cjgone: I chose e5 which I attempted to transpose into the Ne5 position, meh.
May-16-10  patzer2: <Random Visitor> Looks like 21. Qd4! holds the draw for white. In your 27 ply Rybka line, I don't see any real winning chances for Black.
May-16-10  patzer2: I guess the reason I didn't consider 21. Qd4! is that when two pieces are en prise, one feels obligated to move one of them out of "danger." Of course in this case, the greater danger is allowing the Black Queen to remain on the board.
May-16-10  wals: Too classy for me.
Rybka 3 1-cpu: 3071mb hash: depth 16:

White material, a Rook for a Knight and pawn.

-0.61 19.h3. a costly move.
Available:-
1. = (0.00): 19.Bxc6 Bxc6[] 20.h3 Bb5 21.Re1 Nxf2 22.Kxf2 Qh2+[] 23.Ke3[] Qf4+ 24.Kf2 Qh2+[] 25.Ke3[] Qf4+ 26.Kf2 Qh2+[] 27.Ke3[] Qf4+ 28.Kf2 Qh2+[] 29.Ke3[] Qf4+ 30.Kf2 Qh2+[] 31.Ke3[] Qf4+ 32.Kf2 Qh2+[] 33.Ke3[] Qf4+ 34.Kf2

2. = (0.00): 19.Qd2 Qd6 20.h3 Nf6 21.Bxc6 Bxc6 22.Rb3 Ne4 23.Qe3 Ng3 24.fxg3 Qxg3+ 25.Kh1[] Qxh3+ 26.Kg1 Qg3+ 27.Kh1[] Qh3+[] 28.Kg1 Qg3+ 29.Kh1[] Qh3+[] 30.Kg1 Qg3+ 31.Kh1[] Qh3+[] 32.Kg1 Qg3+ 33.Kh1[] Qh3+[] 34.Kg1

3. = (0.00): 19.a4 e5 20.Bxc6 bxc6 21.dxe5[] Nxe5 22.Nxe5 Qxe5 23.Qc1 Qd6 24.Re1 d4 25.Rg3 c5 26.Qc4+ Kh8 27.b3 g6 28.a5 a6

4. = (-0.12): 19.Re1 Nf6 20.Bxc6 Bxc6 21.Ne5 Ne4[] 22.Rc2 Nxf2 23.Qd2[] Nh3+ 24.Kg2 Qf5 25.Rc3 Ng5 26.Qe2 Bb5 27.Qe3 Ne4 28.Rc7 Bf1+ 29.Kh1 Bh3 30.Rg1 Kh8 31.Rc2 Bf1

5. = (-0.14): 19.Rb3 Qd6 20.h3 Rxf3 21.hxg4 Rf4 22.Bxc6 Bxc6 23.Qe2 Rxd4 24.Re1 Rf4 25.Qxe6+ Qxe6 26.Rxe6 Kf7 27.Ree3 Rxg4+ 28.Rg3 Rc4 29.Rbc3 g6

White material, a Rook for a Bishop and pawn.

-7.06 21.Re1.
Available:-
1. (-0.61): 21.Qd4 Bxf1 22.Qxf4[] Rxf4 23.Rc8+ Kf7 24.Ng5+ Kg6[] 25.Nxe6[] Re4 26.hxg4 Be2[] 27.Rc7 Bxg4 28.Rxg7+ Kh6 29.Rf7[] Bxe6 30.Rf6+[] Kg5 31.Rxe6 Re2[] 32.Rd6 Rxb2[]

2. (-0.61): 21.Qc1 Bxf1 22.Qxf4[] Rxf4 23.Rc8+ Kf7 24.Ng5+ Kg6[] 25.Nxe6[] Re4 26.hxg4 Be2[] 27.Rc7 Bxg4 28.Rxg7+ Kh6 29.Rf7[] Bxe6 30.Rf6+[] Kg5 31.Rxe6 Re2[] 32.Rd6 Rxb2[]

3. (-0.88): 21.Qd2 Qxd2 22.Nxd2[] Bxf1 23.hxg4[] Be2 24.Rc7 b5 25.Rxa7 Bxg4 26.Rb7 Rf5 27.Rxb5 Rxe5 28.a4 Re2 29.Nf1 Re1 30.Kg2 Be2

4. (-2.09): 21.a3 Bxf1 22.hxg4 Bh3 23.Qd4[] Bxg4 24.Qxf4[] Rxf4 25.Nd2 g5 26.f3 Bh5 27.Kf2 Kg7 28.Rc8 Rf8 29.Rxf8 Kxf8 30.Nb3 Kf7

White material, Rook and Knight for Bishop and two pawns.

-15.75 23.Rd3.
Available:-
1. (-5.71): 23.Rg1 dxc3[]
2. (-6.77): 23.Kg2 dxc3[]
3. (-7.85): 23.Qxd4 Qxd4+[]
4. (-10.23): 23.Ree3 Qh2+
5. (-10.24): 23.Re4 Qh2+

-16.00 24.Kf1 Qg3 White resigns.

May-16-10  jheiner: Hi <johnlspouge wrote: To play the candidate, you "only" need to calculate...> 19...Ne5 20.exd5 Bxb5 (threatening Rf1).

Thanks for the feedback. That's why I show up. Got a lot out of everyone's analysis today. Two points stand out.

1. The simple combination above doesn't serve up an immediate tactical advantage, but rather a positional one. Ironically in my analysis, I identified those three positional weaknesses (backwards e6 pawn, inactive Bd7, hanging Ng4) that needed solutions, but didn't see how effectively Ne5 solved all three in two tempos. But good to see in retrospect that I was on the right track. Getting there.

2. The need to visualize [potential] pins around the enemy King when planning an assault. While the f3 square was critical, ultimately Ulibin was able to simply attack around f3 into f2, converting the latent f-file battery into huge, active threats that ultimately won the game.

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  David2009: M Sorokin vs Ulibin, 1986 Black 19...? Insane

Black has sacrificed the exchange for a Pawn to reach a complex tactical position: is he right? White has King side weaknesses and hanging pieces. Looking at forcing continuations, 19...Nxd4 looks promising. First variation: 20 Qxd4 Bxb5 21 Rd1 Be2 and White's pieces are hanging. Instead 21 Qxf4 Rxf4 22 h3xg4 Rxg4+ 23 Kh1 Bxf1 24 Nh2 Rh4 and Black has won material. Time to see how the game went.
========
19...Nce5 was played. Ah well.
Playing through the variation, my line is a blunder: 19...Nxd4? 20 Qxd4 Bxb5 21 hxg4! wins a piece <johnlspouge>.

<An Englishman: [snip] My ultimate choice was 19...e5. Anyone know what's wrong with it?> White takes the Ng4 and weathers the storm e.g. 19...e5 20.hxg4 Bxg4 21.Be2 e4 22.Nh2 Bxe2 23.Qxe2 Nxd4 24.Qd1 Nf3+


click for larger view

and now 25.Rxf3! exf3 26.Qxd5+ Kh8 27.Re1 leaves White with N for 2P.

Crafty End Game Trainer on-link to the position withe White to play one move before the puzzle: http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-t... If you play 19. h3 Crafty finds Nce5! and you can try the various White defences posted by others.

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: FYI... My first grandson was born today, around 1 PM PDT. He's a healthy 6 lb. 13 oz. and 20 inches long.

No time for chess today!

May-16-10  Sularus: ^^ congrats jim!

so the future world chess champion was born today eh!

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: < <Jimfromprovidence> wrote: FYI... My first grandson was born today, around 1 PM PDT. >

Nature is sometimes kind: things you might dread at a younger age, like being a grandfather, often become joys as you age.

Congratulations on your first grandson, <Jim>!

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: < <jheiner> wrote: Hi <johnlspouge wrote: To play the candidate, you "only" need to calculate...> 19...Ne5 20.exd5 Bxb5 (threatening Rf1). >

Thanks for the feedback. >

Hi, <jheiner>. I am glad that someone else can make use of my long-winded, solipsistic screeds. You are welcome.

< But good to see in retrospect that I was on the right track. Getting there. >

When I miss nowadays, my preliminary analysis often summarizes precisely the features of the winning combination. Today, I spent too much time on the 2 bad candidates (Nxd4 and Nxf2), but I know exactly the feeling you convey with your words, "getting there" :)

May-16-10  TheBish: M Sorokin vs Ulibin, 1986

Black to play (19...?) "Insane"

By jove, I think I've got it! If so, this would have been a perfect week for me if not for my quick rush to judgment on Wednesday, when I tried to make an easy win even easier!

Here, White is up an exchange (rook for knight) for a pawn, but Black has a pretty strong attack brewing (time to finish my coffee) and White has a weakened king position, especially the light squares, f3 and h3; furthermore, if Black could somehow dislodge the knight on f3, he would have mate on h2.

19...Nce5!!

This amazing move (which I found after eliminating other candidate moves like e5 and Nxd4) unleashes the full potential of Black's pieces, uncovering an attack on White's bishop while threatening no less than mate with 20...Nxf3+ and 21...Qh2#. So not really a piece sacrifice per se, as Black comes out ahead tactically. Now, White can rule out 20. Bxd7?? Nxf3+ followed by mate, as well as 20. Nxe5?? Qh2#. He must either play 20. dxe5 or 20. hxg4, but the latter can be quickly dismissed as well.

A) 20. hxg4 Qxg4+ 21. Kh2 (Kh1 is even worse) Nxf3+ 22. Rxf3 Rxf3 and the only way to stop mate is to give up White's queen, i.e. 23. Qxf3 Qxf3 24. Bxd7 Kf7! and Black is way up in material (Q+2P vs R+B), with more pawns to fall starting with the d4 pawn.

B) 20. dxe5 Bxb5 21. Re1

or 21. hxg4 Qxg4+ 22. Kh2 Bxf1 23. Qxf1 Rxf3 24. Rxf3 Qxf3, an easy Q+P endgame where Black queens the d-pawn, or 21. Qd2 Bxf1 22. Qxf4 Rxf4 23. Kxf1 Rxf3! 24. Rxf3 Nh2+, converting to an easy K+P endgame with Black a protected passed pawn ahead.

21...Nxf2!

This move demolishes the remaining defenses, threatening both the queen and Qg3#, so the knight must be accepted.

22. Kxf2 d4! (threatening both dxc3 and Qh2#) 23. Rd3 Qh2+ 24. Kf1 Qg3!, and White is fit to be tied up! White must now resign, or face the likes of 25. Re2 Bxd3 26. Qxd3 Rxf3+, or 25. Ke2 Qxf3+ 26. Kd2 Qxd3+ 27. Kc1 Rc8+ 28. Qc2 Qxc2#.

Time to see how (or if) Black finished him off.

May-16-10  TheBish: Funny, but in my post I just realized that in the last variation, after 25. Ke2, Black has the much shorter mate with 25...Qg2#! When you see a crushing move, you normally go ahead with it, unless it's a problem! But even here the maxim applies - if you see a good move, look for a better one!
May-16-10  tivrfoa: <patzer2> 21. Qd4 is good, but black can force the exchanges and white would not be able to stop the passed pawn.
May-16-10  RandomVisitor: After 21.Qd4 Bxf1 22.Qxf4 Rxf4 23.Rc8+ Kf7 24.Ng5+ Kg6 25.Nxe6 Rc4 26.Rxc4 dxc4 27.hxg4 c3! 28.bxc3 Bc4


click for larger view

Black exerts pressure with an active bishop and king, and a potential queenside passed pawn give black winning chances.

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: The initial move I saw almost instantly, however, to work out all the tactics took 22 minutes. (Or more.) I got stuck after the Knight sack (for a little while) until I saw 22...d4!! This is a killer move. It threatens the WR on c3 (and takes away e3 from the White King); and if 23.Rb3, Qh2#. Rd3 is then forced. At first I wanted to grab the material, but then I saw that White really is helpless.

OUTSTANDING!!!! (My first correct Sunday in many weeks!)

May-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: I did the above post at around 10:30 PM my time.

My hunch was that White was clearly better at one point, but messed up somewhere down the line. Can anyone verify that with a computer?

May-17-10  patzer2: <Random Visitor> Good work! Your 21. Qd4!? appeared to hold, but now your latest line with 21.Qd4 Bxf1 22.Qxf4 Rxf4 23.Rc8+ Kf7 24.Ng5+ Kg6 25.Nxe6 Rc4 26.Rxc4 dxc4! 27.hxg4 c3! 28.bxc3 Bc4 seems to give Black revived winning chances.

Just curious. How deep ply did you have to go with Rybka to find 26...dxc4 and 27...c3!

May-17-10  RandomVisitor: <patzer2><Just curious. How deep ply did you have to go with Rybka to find 26...dxc4 and 27...c3!>Actually, I did not remember how deep it took to find c3.
Aug-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: This is a GREAT game in grasping the initiative. Once black takes the reins in this game, there is no stopping him.
Apr-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: The rating given here has to be wrong ... he was only rated 2430 a few years later.

http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy&...

FIDE has deleted his card!

Apr-26-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: <<May-16-2010 patzer2: I guess the reason I didn't consider 21. Qd4! is that when two pieces are en prise, one feels obligated to move one of them out of "danger." Of course in this case, the greater danger is allowing the Black Queen to remain on the board. >>

Good note!

Apr-26-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: I am working on a web page on this game ... it should be ready in a day or two.
Apr-28-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: My annotations of this game:

http://www.ajschess.com/lifemastera...

Apr-29-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  LIFE Master AJ: http://www.impalapublications.com/b...
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