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Johann Nepomuk Berger vs Josef Plachutta
"Berger Meister" (game of the day Sep-12-2007)
Graz (1866)
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Rio de Janeiro Variation (C67)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Annotations by Johann Nepomuk Berger.

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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-12-07  posoo: i am da furst again
Sep-12-07  lilfoohk: L. Paulsen's attacking combination which now follows

.......L.Paulsen's good , really a point in that open defence

Sep-12-07  Nasruddin Hodja: Berger is correct about his opponent not knowing the theory. The correct 7th move for black in this variation is 7. ... bxc6 (not dxc6 as in the game) 8. dxe5 Nb7, followed by completing his development with 9. Nc3 0-0 10. Rd1 Nc5 11. b3 Bb7.

I sometimes wonder why this variation of the Berlin defense is obscure today in comparison to the ubiquitous 5. ... Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8 Kxd8 variation. Has an actual refutation of the former been devised?

Sep-12-07  Manequinho: Hey, as a chess player born in Rio de Janeiro, I must learn this variation! Does anybody know why is it called so?
Sep-12-07  Zzyw: For a beautiful game that features the Plachutta theme in over the board play, check Tarrasch vs Allies, 1914
Sep-12-07  lilfoohk: Manequinho: Well Because it's something echoing Brazilian defence , I don't really sure.
Sep-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Funny,it seems there's more talk about Mr. Paulsen than about Mr.Berger here.

BTW,Louis Paulsen is not related to Robert Paulsen-alleged friend of Tyler Durdan-founder of FIGHT CLUBS UNLIMITED. (an inside joke for fans of the movie FIGHT CLUB)

Sep-12-07  twin phoenix: 26 N-d5!! really is an outstanding move. i don't understand why black takes the rook (28. R-e7,Bxe7?). could he not just move his king 28.--,K-g6? I can't find a way for white to finish him after that, although i'm sure i'm probably missing something.
Sep-12-07  homersheineken: Can someone explain why it is theoretically ok for white to abandon the e4 pawn like that? Thanks
Sep-12-07  GoHabsGo: I think that black should play 16... O-O-O and he has then an interesting game.
Sep-12-07  xKinGKooLx: Good game, but I thought "Berger King" would have been a much better pun. What does "Berger Meister" mean?
Sep-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessmensch: White was so completely in control that he didn't have time or need to use any of his queenside pieces until move 18. Then when he did use them he did so very effectively so as to remain totally in control for the rest of the game.
Sep-12-07  Morphystyle: Nasruddin Hodja: There is no refutation of your old line above, but it simply leads to a cramped position for black With queens, plus his queenside pawn structure is weak in most variations (10 Re1 is stronger). The more in fashion variation trades the queens making white attacking possibilities nearly nil and the queenside pawns are strong. The black king can protect either side without worry of a quick assault
Sep-12-07  lopium: "xKinGKooLx: Good game, but I thought "Berger King" would have been a much better pun. What does "Berger Meister" mean?" Joseph Meister was the first human to be vacunated, it was by Louis Pasteur, against the "rage" in French. Meister was a berger (keep sheeps) and was bited by a contaminated dog.
Sep-12-07  krusheto: <xKinGKooLx> Meister = Master? Maybe, who knows? Plus in Bulgarian master is pronounced Maister or Maistor.
Sep-12-07  belgradegambit: A pun on Burgomeister (lord mayor of a town): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgom...
Sep-16-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <lopium> Sadly, your Pasteur-Meister-berger/shepherd link is not the 'true' one -- I say 'sadly', because I prefer it to the alternatives.

But there are a lot of options. 'Burg' is a town and 'berg' is a mountain in several Germanic/Scandinavian languages. The French 'berger' -- et n'oubliez pas les bergeres -- is a different root.

And 'keeps sheeps' may not be *totally* idiomatic, but it's still the best definition of 'shepherd' that I've heard.

Sep-16-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Pawn and Two: <Mannequinho> The Rio de Janeiro variation was played in a telegraph game Buenos Aires - Rio de Janeiro, 1903, and was named after the home of its originator, Dr. Joao Caldas Vianna (1862-1931).

The correct moves for the original Rio variation are; 7...bxc6 8.dxe5 Nb7 9.Nc3 0-0 10.Re1 Nc5 11.Nd4 Ne6 12.Be3 Nxd4 13.Bxd4 c5.

In his notes to the Lasker-Tarrasch match of 1908, Teichmann states this variation was recommended to him during his stay in Rio de Janeiro by Dr. Caldas Vianna. Teichmann indicated he had since advocated this line of play and had adopted it in his game with Marco, G Marco vs Teichmann, 1907.

During the Lasker-Tarrasch match of 1908, the Rio variation was given a severe test in games 8, 10 and 14. Tarrasch vs Lasker, 1908, Tarrasch vs Lasker, 1908, and Tarrasch vs Lasker, 1908.

Also of interest is Schlechter's method of meeting the Rio in his game with Reti, Schlechter vs Reti, 1914. The substitution of 10.Nd4 for 10.Re1, followed by 14.b4!, enabled White to avoid the drawing possibilities of the Rio de Janeiro variation.

Aug-12-14  Xeroxx: Nice combination.
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