chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

(If you register a free account you won't see all these ads!)
Vladimir Kramnik vs Viswanathan Anand
FIDE World Championship Tournament (2007), Mexico City MEX, rd 10, Sep-24
Semi-Slav Defense: Anti-Moscow Gambit (D44)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 195 more Kramnik/Anand games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 30 OF 30 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-25-07  mworld: Looked at it even more.

33.Rxa6 still looks like a win to me.

Sep-25-07  mworld: wow, i think i may have stumbled on something from just looking at it while following the game!

I sure hope someone proves me wrong, because I still doubt that I could see something like this that a 2800+ player might not have : /

Sep-25-07  yogi1986: mworld, can you post a line, after kxr The Queen cannot check at a8 as it is covered by the black queen, and Ra1 check seems to lead nowhere.
Sep-25-07  mworld: I just played out a huge variety of Ra1 checks after KxR and they all seemed to end in mate. I apologize, but I am just using a board and playing it through one line then repeating with what I think others are.

At a certain point I just started trying to refute that Ra1+ doesn't lead to mate and haven't found one yet.

So basically if you see one, please let me know --- since I am stuck trying to find one still.

Sep-25-07  mworld: ok so just doing the generic first response to kxR in notation here goes:

33.Rxa6 Kxa6 34.Ra1+ Kb6 35.Qb8+ Kc6 36.Ra6#

Sep-25-07  you vs yourself: <mworld> 35.Qb8+ Rb7
Sep-25-07  mworld: Thank you :)

I knew I had to be missing something!

Sep-25-07  mworld: mworld: lol now you got me looking at 35.Qc8 threatening 36.Ra6# I don't know why, but it feels a lot like there could be something to gain from that rook sac to me.

ahh well, just one of those ones that pokes you in the gut and you feel like there should be something there I guess.

Sep-26-07  Ulhumbrus: Marin has the following remark on the end of the game: < 41.Ra8+. The position remains very interesting, but both players were probably tired after the previous intense fight. After 41.Ra8+ , Black could return to b6, when White can force a perpetual already, or play 41...Kb4 with a double edged position. We can see an interesting symbiosis: the pawns would protect the king and the king sustains the advance of the pawns. I would again quote a game played by the 9th World Champion (Fischer - Petrosian, second round of the 1959 Candidates' Tournament) in which Black successfully carried out a similar plano.> The game which Marin refers to may be the following one: Fischer vs Petrosian, 1959 However in that game Fischer had a Queen, a Rook and a B playing against a Queen, a Rook, a Knight (and of course two connected passed pawns on the Queen side), whereas in the present game Kramnik had a Queen and two Rooks playing against a Queen, a Rook, and a Knight,( and two connected passed pawns on the Queen- side).
Sep-26-07  Ulhumbrus: <blazerdoodle> On the other side of the coin, Fine says that in 1932 or 1933 Capablanca showed him once his voluminous correspondence with Alekhine and detailed the manoeuvres which Alekhine employed to avoid a return match, and years later in 1939 when, following a conversation with Olga Capablanca, Alekhine sent Capablanca a message saying that he was willing to play a return match, Capablanca said that Alekhine was an utter swine and that Capablanca refused to have anything more to do with him. However this does not mean that Alekhine intended any wickedness. Alekhine thought that Capablanca had approached the president of FIDE and was trying to change the rules without consulting him, whereas Capablanca said that Alekhine had put "an absurd interpretation" upon a letter which Capablanca had written to Rogard. I suggest that the quarrel between Capablanca and Alekhine may have been caused by a misunderstanding.
Sep-26-07  Atkins: I read somewhere that <35.Qh6> which threats both Qxa6+ and Qxg5 with a passed pawn on White side too. That looks very good indeed. What was the time for Kramnik when he played 35.Rec1?
Sep-26-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: <mworld: lol now you got me looking at 35.Qc8 threatening 36.Ra6#> 33.Rxa6 Kxa6 34.Ra1+ Kb6 35.Qc8 can be replied with 35...Ra7.
Sep-26-07  mworld: Honza you are correct - i gave up on the move after beating my head against it for a few hours. I may need to invest in learning how to use some comp evaluation tools so I can avoid driving myself crazy.
Sep-27-07  znprdx: Does anyone have any recent conclusive analysis after 41....Kb4: <I found the startling 42.Qg6> rather than the presumed Qg8. Another line was Rb8 and here too I found something - in both cases it is White which appears to have the upper hand. Anand did the right thing not to force the issue.

Perhaps even at the highest levels of competition when the choice tree suddenly seems to paradoxically expand rather than contract, opting for a draw can in fact be honorable in the face of increasing risk.

However Kramnik's disgraceful draw with Grishuk does not meet this standard and I believe that the journalist Garcia is making this point convincingly. However I am pleased to read that Kramnik has acknowledged that he can't claim to still be the World Champion if he fails to win, which is now increasingly unlikely.

Sep-29-07  Ulhumbrus: Anand gets high marks for courage, playing with Black what looks like a suicidal opening defence, against Kramnik of all people
Sep-30-07  Hesam7: Kramnik missed 35 Qh6! after 35...Qd6 36 Qxg5 f6 37 Qg8


click for larger view

It seems that we get aposition similar to the game but without the g5-pawn, which gives White a concrete plan, namely undermining the d4 pawn via f4. Anyway Fruit 2.3.1 gives the following:

37...Rd8 38 Qh7 Rd7 39 Qh4 Qe6 40 Qe4 Qd5 41 Qd3 Rd6 42 Qh7 Rd7 43 Qh8 Qd6 44 Rac1 Rd8 45 Qg7 Rd7 46 Qg8 Rd8 47 Qf7 Rd7 48 Qa2 Rd8 49 f4 exf4 50 Rc3 Ka7 51 Qf7 Rd7 (eval: +0.61 @ depth 22)

Sep-30-07  Atkins: Yes <Hesam> I noted that too somewhere. Indeed in both games Anand was in difficulty on the board... In other hand I suppose that Kramnik was short on time to make the correct decision.
Nov-04-07  blazerdoodle: <Ulhumbrus:

I suggest that the quarrel between Capablanca and Alekhine may have been caused by a misunderstanding.>

It actually makes since. Has that the correspondence that Fine saw has been lost? It is a difficult subject. I've only read Alekhines side of it.

Dec-06-07  Ulhumbrus: <blazerdoodle: <Ulhumbrus:

I suggest that the quarrel between Capablanca and Alekhine may have been caused by a misunderstanding.>

It actually makes since. Has that the correspondence that Fine saw has been lost? It is a difficult subject. I've only read Alekhines side of it.>

I am not sure but it is possible that either the Manhattan chess club or the Marshall chess club has archives ir some library which includes the correspondance. It is also possible that Olga Capablanca or her heirs or her estate may possess the correspondance.

Kasparov gives an account of the matter in his book. Kasparov's account suggests that that Capablanca was unlucky: the great depression of 1929 made it difficult to find people willing to fund a return match. Whether that suggestion is correct is another matter. The correspondance may give some indication.

However if the quarrel was caused by a misunderstanding, Alekhine could have avoided a return match for reasons which Capablanca would not know. Either player could have construed improper intentions on the part of the other, when in fact none existed on the part of either.

Dec-25-07  Hesam7: <Hesam7: In the press conference Anand said that he was afraid of 34 Rad1 and could not see how Black could solve his problems after that. Anyone with an engine analysis??>

It seems that his fear was unfounded. After 34 Rad1 a5!


click for larger view

Fruit 2.3.1 does not find anything for White @ depth 19:

[1] 35.Qg7 a4 36.Re5 Qb3 37.Ree1 Qd5 [0.00 Nodes: 2617.4 M]

[2] 35.h3 Qc6 36.Qg8 Ka6 37.Rc1 Qd5 38.Qh8 Nxf3 39.gxf3 Qxf3+ 40.Kg1 Qg3+ 41.Kh1 Qf3+ [0.00 Nodes: 2707.3 M]

[3] 35.Rc1 a4 36.Qe8 Ka6 37.Rc8 Nxf3 38.gxf3 Qxf3+ 39.Kg1 Qg4+ 40.Kf1 Qf4+ 41.Kg1 Qg4+ [0.00 Nodes: 2716.4 M]

[4] 35.Qh8 f5 36.Rc1 Qd6 37.Qc8+ Kb6 38.Qg8 a4 39.Qxg5 a3 40.Qd2 e5 41.Red1 Kb7 42.Rb1 Rg7 43.Qa2 Qc5 44.Rbc1 Qd6 45.Rb1 [0.00 Nodes: 2724.8 M]

[5] 35.Qe8 f6 36.Qf8 f5 37.Rc1 a4 38.Red1 Qd6 39.Qg8 a3 40.Rc8 b4 41.Ra8 Kb6 42.Rb8+ Ka5 43.Ra8+ Kb5 44.Rb8+ Ka4 45.Ra8+ Kb5 [0.00 Nodes: 2806.3 M]

Jan-03-08  sallom89: <mworld: ok so just doing the generic first response to kxR in notation here goes:

33.Rxa6 Kxa6 34.Ra1+ Kb6 35.Qb8+ Kc6 36.Ra6#>

thats a clear win!!!!!

Jan-06-08  Hesam7: Another possibility for White is: 27 Qf3+ Nd5 28 Rfc1:


click for larger view

My engine's top line leads to a R vs N endgame in which White should have very good winning chances: 28...f5 29 Rc5 Rc8 30 Rxc8 g4 31 Qg3 Qxg3 32 fxg3 Kxc8 33 Rxa6 Kd7


click for larger view

I am really looking forward to the annotations of this game in Informator 101.

Dec-30-08  yalie: <I am really looking forward to the annotations of this game in Informator 101. >

I hope you didnt spend too much time:). I doubt if you will ever get this position again. As black, just play 20..Nc4 and you have equalized.

By the way, I wonder why cg.com does not have this game in the database (played barely 10-12 days after kramnik-Anand):

http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/fil...

Apr-27-09  notyetagm: 29 ?


click for larger view

(VAR)
29 ♕h6xg5??


click for larger view

29 ... ♘f4-e2+ 30 ♔g1-h1 ♕d6xh2+! 31 ♔h1x♕h2 ♖f8-h8+ 32 ♕g5-h4 ♖h8x♕h4+ <anastasia mate>


click for larger view


click for larger view


click for larger view

Apr-27-09  notyetagm: <yalie: I hope you didnt spend too much time:). I doubt if you will ever get this position again. <<<As black, just play 20..Nc4 and you have equalized.>>>

By the way, I wonder why cg.com does not have this game in the database (played barely 10-12 days after kramnik-Anand):

http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/fil...;

I just submitted this game to be added to the cg.com database.

[Event "EU-Cup 23rd"]
[Site "Kemer"]
[Date "2007.10.03"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Eljanov,Pavel"]
[Black "Anand,Viswanathan"]
[Result "1/2"]
[Eco "D43"]
1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 dxc4 7.e4 g5 8.Bg3 b5 9.Be2 Bb7 10.0-0 Nbd7 11.Ne5 Bg7 12.Nxd7 Nxd7 13.Bd6 a6 14.Bh5 Bf8 15.Bxf8 Rxf8 16.e5 Qb6 17.b3 0-0-0 18.bxc4 Nxe5 19.c5 Qa5 20.Ne4 Nc4 21.Be2 f5 22.Bxc4 fxe4 23.Bxe6+ Kb8 24.Re1 Qc3 25.Rxe4 Qb2 26.f3 Rf4 27.Qc1 Qxc1+ 28.Rxc1 Rxd4 29.Rxf4 gxf4 30.g4 fxg3 1/2

<GC: DO NOT LET YOUR OPPONENT HAVE STRONG PIECES!> Anand's improvement 20 ... Ne5-c4! prevents Ne4-d6

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 30)
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 30 OF 30 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No posting personal information of members.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
20... Rxd6
from 53a_Middlegames: Positional Exchange Sacrifices by whiteshark
Fide 2007 world cup
by King mega
29 Qh6xg5?? allows mate after 29 ... Nf4-e2+ and 30 .. Qd6xh2+!
from Mating patterns: Anastasia mate by notyetagm
20... Rxd6
from 53a_Middlegames: Positional Exchange Sacrifices by Del ToRo
Semi Slav - Moscow
by yassenj
Book of Samurai's favorite games 4
by Book of Samurai
ramzee997's favorite games
by ramzee997
20... Rxd6
from 53a_Middlegames: Positional Exchange Sacrifices by Jaredfchess
Anand at his best
by you vs yourself
Round 10: Kramnik 5, Anand 6 1/2
from 2007 World Chess Championship by Penguincw
repertorio gaston Black Compiled by afabian
by fredthebear
repertorio gaston
by afabian
Kramnik-Anand
by fref


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2018, Chessgames Services LLC