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Evgeny Tomashevsky vs Alexander Morozevich
Russian Championship Superfinal (2007), Moscow RUS, rd 3, Dec-20
Reti Opening: Advance Variation (A09)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-20-07  MorphysMojo: Moro wins this one with great combinative threats which although parried give up squares that lead to a Moro breakthrough. This is the Moro we know!
Dec-21-07  malthrope: Ditto what - <kellmano>, <Everett>, <tamar>, <Shams> and <MorphysMojo> all just said. It was super Moro fantastic! A royal treat to watch it 'live!' :))

When <tamar> posted this on the - Russian Superfinals (2007) - (on page -10-):

"It is starting to resemble a mutant Marshall Gambit!"

I just about died laughing! No one, but no one creates the sublime chaos of complications like Moro does! :^)

Dec-21-07  SniperOnG7: Wow. Moro is leet!
Dec-21-07  kellmano: Yep it went from a reversed Benoni to a mutant Marshall. I'd like to see someone annotate this game to see how accurate it all was (hint to Ezzy). I remember as we were watching live someone said that 14.....g5 was the silicon monsters twelfth(!) preference.

I think i'm gonna have to get myself to a net cafe tomorrow afternoon.

Dec-21-07  malthrope: <kellmano> - <I remember as we were watching live someone said that 14.....g5 was the silicon monsters twelfth(!) preference.>

That would be <tamar> who said that...

<"Looking good, you saunter back to the table to find 14...g5!?, a move not even in the top ten on your silicon helper. (It comes in 12th)">

Let's also hope that <Ezzy> see this...

<kellmano <I'd like to see someone annotate this game to see how accurate it all was (hint to Ezzy).>>

He'd be *perfect* for the job! :^)

PS: <SniperOnG7: Wow. Moro is leet!> - Had to look up the current usage of the word 'leet' - Yep! That describes our chess hero the great Morozevich to a tee! :))

Dec-21-07  kellmano: Er, waht do you mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com/bro...

Dec-21-07  malthrope: <kellmano: Er, waht do you mean?

http://dictionary.reference.com/bro... >

Hehehe... I was using the Wiki and got this one >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leet

Dec-21-07  Tariqov: 45...Bd2 ends white
Dec-21-07  legalmover24: Is black's win just a result of white's g-pawn being about to get munched, or is there something more forceful than that? What does Bd2 accomplish in this position? It obviously guards e3, but Qe3 just allows Kxg3. Please enlighten me, a mere novice.
Dec-21-07  slomarko: dont listen to him Bd2 is crap. this is the final postion


click for larger view

white to play and basicaly he doesn't have a good move. lets say he plays 45.Qc2 then Rg4 and the knight is attacked twice and has nowhere to go.


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in the initial position relatively best for white is to play 45.c6


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but then black can win easily. for example a nice way to is 45...Bd6 46.Rh1 (there is no good move) Qe3 47.Kf1


click for larger view

Be7! 48.c7 Bh4 49.c8Q


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Rf1! 50.Rf1 Qf2#


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Dec-21-07  Riverbeast: Another Morozevich creation. What an artist...

'Davai', Moro!

Dec-21-07  slomarko: one before last diagram should look like this:


click for larger view

Dec-21-07  ajile: Reverse Benoni?

lol

Dec-21-07  malthrope: <ajile: Reverse Benoni?

lol>

Hehehe... ;) Clearly the 'Mutant Marshall' (as coined by <tamar>) only accepts certain types of transpositional possibilities! :^)

Dec-21-07  ajile: White says "Here take the center!" And Black says "OK"

:o)

Dec-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: that initial pawn structure sort of looked like something from coffee house blitz....there may be hope for the rest of us....
Dec-22-07  Turbo.Abraham: Can someone explain why 11.h4 was played? It seems to be a weakening of the K-side, but Im a relative patzer
Dec-22-07  AlexandraThess: Nice play by Tomashevskiy. I often use the same system as white.
Dec-22-07  Ulhumbrus: 12 Re1 gives Black time to castle. However on 12 h5 Nf8 13 Nh4 f5 discovers an attack upon the N. This suggests that the attack 11 h4 ?! is dubious if not mistaken.

14 Nh4 sets a trap. On 14...f5? 15 Bd5+ Nf7 16 Ng6! hxg6 17 hxg6 threatens 18 gxf7+ Kh7 19 Qh5 mate. However Morozevich advances the g pawn instead.

17 Bxc6 concedes the KB in order to win the e pawn. Instead of ocupying the long diagonal by 25...Bb7, Morozevich plays 25..Bd7, keeping White's pieces out of the square e6.

26...Rh8!! begins an imaginative plan, that of making an exchange sacrifice by ..Rh5 followed by ...Rxg5 and then advancing the f pawn

30 Re1-g1 seems passive. Morozevich has left the e6 square undefended. Can White prepare to occupy it? On 31 Nh4 Rxg5 32 fxg5 f4? 33 Qe6 fg+ 34 Kg1 Black cannot defend the g6 pawn. On 31 Nh4 Rxg5 32 fxg5 Re7! seems better. On 33 Qd2 Rxe1 34 Qxe1 Bd7 25 Kg1 Qc7 26 Kh2 f4 27 gf Bxf4+ 28 Kg1 Bxg5 Black may end up winning.

Dec-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Afternoon: I like Morozevich's initial sacrifice of a pawn just to get rid of White's light-squared Bishop. A look at the moves *not* played will reveal the influence of the a8-h1 long diagonal on White's play.

Still, I'm curious: doesn't 4.b4 lead to a Benko Gambit Reversed with an extremely useful extra move in g3? If I were up against Moro, I'd much rather give than receive.

Must be the spirit of the holidays.

Dec-22-07  cade: Why not 24...Bxg3

It seems like a fairly obvious move to me.

Dec-22-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <cade> After 24...Bxg3 25.Re7+ wins the queen. Black's 24...Rf7 stopped that threat.
Dec-30-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: 30 Re1-g1 seems passive. Morozevich has left the e6 square undefended. Can White prepare to occupy it? On 31 Nh4 Rxg5 32 fxg5 f4? 33 Qe6 fg+ 34 Kg1 Black cannot defend the g6 pawn. On 31 Nh4 Rxg5 32 fxg5 Re7! seems better. On 33 Qd2 Rxe1 34 Qxe1 Bd7 25 Kg1 Qc7 26 Kh2 f4 27 gf Bxf4+ 28 Kg1 Bxg5 Black may end up winning.>

I suppose those lines should begin with <30> Nh4. As it turns out, 30.Rg1 as played in the game also denies the g1 square to the white king, after which 33.Qe6 (instead of 33.g4) becomes unplayable. The alternative line beginning with 30.Nh4 Rxg5 31.fxg5 Re7! doesn't make sense, but 31...Qc7 should be strong - if 32.Rg1 then Re7 followed by Re3. White's best 30th move might be <Bh4>, which like Rg1 and Nh4 also defends against the threat of Bxf3 followed by Rh2+. For example, after 30...Bxf4 31.gxf4 Bxf3 32.Qxf3 Rxh4 33.Qxb7 Rxb7 perhaps the rook endgame can be saved.

Jan-08-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Here's a look with Fritz 8 and the Opening Explorer:

<1. Nf3 d5 2. c4> Maybe White should have played 2. d4 =, which appears to be the move played over 70% of the time at Master level. <2... d4 3. g3> Another opening idea in the spirit of this game is 3. b4 =, as in Damljanovic vs E Romanov, 2007. <3... c5 4. e3 Nc6 5. exd4 cxd4 6. Bg2 e5 7. O-O f6 8. d3 Nge7> Don't know if it's a novelty, but it's the first such move in the OE database here and also Fritz 8's first choice at 14 depth. Previously played was 8...Bg4 as in Blatny vs W Longren, 2000 and 8...Be6 as in Zvjaginsev vs A Hauchard, 1999. <9. a3 a5 10. Nbd2 Ng6 11. h4 Be7 12. Re1 O-O 13. h5> Maybe White can get counterplay with 13. Ne4 Nh8 14. Qa4 Bd7 15. c5 Nf7 16. Qc4 Qc7 17. Bd2 h6 18. Rac1 h5 19. b4 axb4 20. axb4 Ncd8 21. Ra1 =. <13... Nh8 14. Nh4 g5 15. hxg6 hxg6 16. Be4 f5 17. Bxc6 bxc6 18. Nhf3 Nf7 19. Nxe5 Nxe5 20. Rxe5 Bd6 21. Re1 c5 22. Nf3 Kg7 23. Bg5> Perhaps not so good for White is the tempting 23. Ng5 f4! 24. Ne6+ (24. Bxf4 Bxf4 25. gxf4 Rxf4 26. Ne4 Qh4 27. Ng3 Bg4 ) 24... Bxe6 25. Rxe6 Qd7 26. Qe2 Rae8 27. Rxe8 Rxe8 28. Qf3 Re1+ 29. Kg2 Qd8 30. Qd5 Qh8 31. Kf3 Be7 <23...Qc7 24. Nh4 Rf7 25. Qe2 Bd7 26. f4 Rh8 27. Kf2 Qb7 28. Rab1 Rh5 29. Nf3 Bc6 30.Rg1> Black is better and probably winning after 30. Bh4 Bxf4 31. gxf4 Bxf3 32. Qxf3 Rxh4 33. Qxb7 Rxb7 34. Re5 Rb3 35. Rxc5 Rxd3 36. Rxa5 Rxf4+ . <30...Rf8 31. Nh4 Rxg5!!> The exchange sacrifice demolishes White's position and exposes his King to a withering attack. <32. fxg5 f4! 33. g4> No help for White is 33. gxf4 Bxf4 34. Rg4 Bxg5+ 35. Kg1 Be3+ 36. Kh2 Rf2+ . <33... Re8 34. Qd2 Re3> A winning alternative is 34... Rh8! 35. Ng2 Bxg2 36. Rxg2 f3 37. Kg1 fxg2 38. Qxg2 Bh2+ 39. Kf1 Rf8+ 40. Qf2 Rxf2+ 41. Kxf2 > <35. b4 Qe7! 36. bxc5 Qxg5> Also winning is 36... Bxc5 . <37. Rh1> This sad move is practically forced due to possibilities like 37. Rbd1 Qxh4+ 38. Kf1 Rf3+ 39. Kg2 Rf2# <37... Bxh1 38. Rxh1 Bxc5 39. Qd1 Qe7 40. a4 Rg3 41. Ng2 Bb4 42. Rh2 Qe5 43. c5 f3 44. Nh4 Qf4> 0-1 White resigns in lieu of such possibilities as 45. Rh1 Qxg4 46. Rh2 g5 47. Nxf3 Be1+ 48. Kxe1 Rxf3 49. Qe2 .

Aug-22-09  Chlipchlop: <Turbo.Abraham: Can someone explain why 11.h4 was played? It seems to be a weakening of the K-side, but Im a relative patzer> Well, if you look at the provocative ♘g6 of Morozevitch, you would perhaps also consider pushing the knight to the corner is a good thing. And if h4-h5 can be considered as a weakening of the K-side, it's nothing compared to Moro's g5 !? (:D). Moro played here moves we consider from a reasonable point of view "silly" (I would not recommend beginners to get their knight in the h8 square...), but here for some tactical reasons it's not that bad, mainly because white's knight has to retreat too and black gains some space in this sequence.
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