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Pavel Eljanov vs Teimour Radjabov
Corus Group A (2008), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 5, Jan-17
King's Indian Defense: Six Pawns Attack (E77)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

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Jan-17-08  Shams: <<percyblakeney>Looking through Corus 2003 and 2007, it seems as if Radjabov has +7 -0 =3 in his last ten KID's (or KID-Benonis)>

clearly, it's only a matter of time before the young iconoclast washes his hands of this flawed defense.

Jan-17-08  Avarus: This sort of benoni is easy to play for black. Yes, white is also quite solid but imo if black can play ..b5 without some concession, black has a good game.

<Eyal>, I'm no expert but thought 20..Bxf1 was natural here, as it is somehow just in the way of ..b5.

Jan-17-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: A nice point mentioned by Radja is that 22...Qd7 prepares to meet 23.Qf4 with 23...Be5 24.Qh4 Bd4+ 25.Bf2 Bg7 - "Then the queen is just useless on h4, and f5 and b5 are coming".

Jan-17-08  Ezzy: Eljanov,Pavel (2692) - Radjabov,Teimour (2735) [E70] Corus Chess 2008 Wijk aan Zee (5), 17.01.2008

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Bd3 0–0 6.Nge2 c5 7.d5 e6 8.Bg5< Eljanov tried an unfashionable move in the opening against Kramnik in the last round which didn't work out too well. Now he tries one against Radjabov. The only big name player to have played 8 Bg5 was Petrosian against Fischer in a blitz game in 1970, which Petrosian lost. He probably lost because it was Fischer he was playing, and not because of 8 Bg5 :-) Experts in an opening usually punish you for inferior moves though, and Radjabov is an expert with the Kings Indian This position is more of a Benoni, but Radjabov is probably an expert in that as well. Lets just say he’s an expert in everything J> 8...h6 9.Bf4 Ng4< New move. 9...exd5 and 9...e5 have been played before.> 10.Qd2 Na6 11.a3 Nc7 12.f3 Ne5 13.0–0 exd5 14.cxd5 Nxd3 15.Qxd3 b6 16.Qd2 Kh7 17.Ng3 Ba6 18.Rfe1 Re8 19.a4 Bc4 20.Nf1< Aiming for e3 - g4 so Radjabov doesn't allow that. .> 20...Bxf1 21.Rxf1 a6 22.Bg3 Qd7 23.Rae1 b5 24.f4?? <I am giving this move as a blunder because someone of Eljanov's rating should not be making moves like this. For any Grandmaster, the tactics that ensue should not be beyond their capabilities. It was an aweful move. This is the second time (the first was against Kramnik) that Eljanov has tried to simplify to an inferior ending. So the double question mark is for his naivety>. 24...b4 25.Nd1 f5 26.exf5 Qxf5 27.Ne3 Rxe3 28.Rxe3 Bd4 29.Bf2 Bxe3 30.Bxe3 Nxd5 31.Rd1 Re8 32.Bf2< Ok 24 f4 wasn't a blunder as blunders go, but this is, so I will not punctuate this with a ?? I will leave it on 24 f4?? [32.Qxd5 Qxd5 33.Rxd5 Rxe3 34.Rxd6 Rb3 35.Rd2 c4 Is obviously the way to go, but white still has to suffer the endgame pressure.] >32...Nxf4 33.Qxd6 <Blimey, it gets worse. >33...Qe4 0–1 <Radjabov says that white was relying on 34.Qd7+ Re7 35.Qg4 and missed 35...Ne2+> 0–1

So Radja roles on with his Kings. Indian stroke Benoni. It seems to be a bad day for calculating variations. Eljanov’s 24 f4?? Was just aweful. I know I keep ranting on about it, but I am an amateur chessplayer and I could even see that it wasn’t natural and had possibilities for disaster.. I couldn’t calculate everything, but on general principles the d5 pawn would end up seriously weak. It just wasn’t right to open up the center. Just a gut feeling. Eljanov should have had more than gut feeling, he is blessed with calculating ability, and it should be well within his grasp to see that it led to a mch inferior position for him. A horrible move..

What an amiable and friendly guy young Teimor is. Great sense of humour. I could become a big fan of Radjabov, he presents himself really well and has a nice karma about him. Yeah, I think I’m starting to become a Radjabov fan.

Jan-17-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ezzy: 32.Qxd5 Qxd5 33.Rxd5 Rxe3 34.Rxd6 Rb3 35.Rd2 c4 Is obviously the way to go>

As was pointed out in a previous post, 34...Re2! is much stronger in this line, as White can't defend the b pawn and Black gets a pair of connected passed pawns. Perhaps White's best practical chances reside in the queen endgame reached by 32.Bxc5 dxc5 33.Qxd5 Re1+(!) 34.Kf2 Rxd1 35. Qxd1 Qxf4+ where Black is a pawn up but White retains the b pawn.

Jan-17-08  Ezzy: <Eyal:Perhaps White's best practical chances reside in the queen endgame reached by 32.Bxc5 dxc5 33.Qxd5 Re1+(!) 34.Kf2 Rxd1 35. Qxd1 Qxf4+ where Black is a pawn up but White retains the b pawn.> Absolutely. Them pesky queen and pawn endgames are notoriously difficult to win, especially when the kings are vulnerable to repeated checks.

Good line that 32 Bxc5. That would have kept 'em in the playing hall til the sun went down.

Jan-17-08  notyetagm: <Ezzy: 33...Qe4 0–1


click for larger view

<Radjabov says that white was relying on 34.Qd7+ Re7 35.Qg4 and


click for larger view

missed 35...Ne2+


click for larger view

> 0–1>

So the sequence 34 ♕d6-d7+, 35 ♕d7-g4 belongs in my Game Collection: Checks let you reposition defenders for free, while 35 ♕d7-g4 ♘f4-e2+ belongs in both my Game Collection: If you line up the pieces, reason matters not and Game Collection: Discovered attacks.

Jan-17-08  notyetagm: <Eyal: A nice point mentioned by Radja is that 22...Qd7


click for larger view

prepares to meet 23.Qf4 with 23...Be5 24.Qh4 Bd4+ 25.Bf2 Bg7 - "Then the queen is just useless on h4, and f5 and b5 are coming".>


click for larger view

Jan-17-08  notyetagm: <percyblakeney: Looking through Corus 2003 and 2007, it seems as if Radjabov has +7 -0 =3 in his last ten KID's (or KID-Benonis), the first of the ten being a draw against Karpov in 2003 (the other two draws being against Kramnik):>

That's <85%(!)> with Black(!) against the world's top players!

Wow.

Jan-18-08  Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 26 exf5 is to remove a potential pin on White's N placed on the square e3 from the move..Bd4 by the move 26 Kh1. On 26 Kh1 fxe4 27 Ne3 Bd4 28 f5 the N has supported this advance in time, as on 28...Bxe3 the f5 pawn can take the g6 pawn with check. On 28...Bxe3 29 fxg6+ Kxg6 30 Qxe3 Black may stand badly.
Jan-18-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 26 exf5 is to remove a potential pin on White's N placed on the square e3 from the move..Bd4 by the move 26 Kh1. On 26 Kh1 fxe4 27 Ne3 Bd4 28 f5 the N has supported this advance in time, as on 28...Bxe3 the f5 pawn can take the g6 pawn with check. On 28...Bxe3 29 fxg6+ Kxg6 30 Qxe3 Black may stand badly.>

Clearly, Black shouldn't allow White to execute the f5 plan so easily: 26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 is very bad for White.

Eljanov seriously underestimated the dangers involved in the undermining of his central pawn structure resulting from 24.f4?

Jan-18-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 26 exf5 is to remove a potential pin on White's N placed on the square e3 from the move..Bd4 by the move 26 Kh1. On 26 Kh1 fxe4 27 Ne3 Bd4 28 f5 the N has supported this advance in time, as on 28...Bxe3 the f5 pawn can take the g6 pawn with check. On 28...Bxe3 29 fxg6+ Kxg6 30 Qxe3 Black may stand badly.> Clearly, Black shouldn't allow White to execute the f5 plan so easily: 26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 is very bad for White.

Eljanov seriously underestimated the dangers involved in the undermining of his central pawn structure resulting from 24.f4?> On 29 Qc2 Black's Q cannot both defend the e4 pawn and keep the f4 pawn back.

Jan-18-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8] 29 Qc2 Black's Q cannot both defend the e4 pawn and keep the f4 pawn back.> It doesn't have to - Black has the excellent reply 29...Bd4! Now 30.Qxe4 loses, of course, to 30...Re8; if White defends the knight with his queen, then Bxe3 followed by Qf5; if 30.Re1, the rook doesn't support the f5 advance anymore and either 30...Re8 or 30...Bxe3 31.Rxe3 Nxd5 32.Rxe4 Qf5 are very good for Black; and a desperate piece sacrifice by 30.f5 doesn't seem to give White nearly enough compensation.
Jan-19-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8] 29 Qc2 Black's Q cannot both defend the e4 pawn and keep the f4 pawn back.> It doesn't have to - Black has the excellent reply 29...Bd4! Now 30.Qxe4 loses, of course, to 30...Re8; if White defends the knight with his queen, then Bxe3 followed by Qf5; if 30.Re1, the rook doesn't support the f5 advance anymore and either 30...Re8 or 30...Bxe3 31.Rxe3 Nxd5 32.Rxe4 Qf5 are very good for Black; and a desperate piece sacrifice by 30.f5 doesn't seem to give White nearly enough compensation.> On 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 31 fxg6+ Kg7 32 Rxf8 Kxf8 33 Qxe4 Bg5 34 Bxd6+!! Qxd6 35 Qf5+ Ke8 36 Qf7+ Kd8 37 g7 wins. On 29...Bd4 30 f5 gxf5 31 Nxf5 Rxf5 32 Qxe4 Kg6 33 Bh4 threatens g4
Jan-19-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.Qc2] 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 31 fxg6+ Kg7 32 Rxf8 Kxf8 33 Qxe4 Bg5 34 Bxd6+!! Qxd6 35 Qf5+ Ke8 36 Qf7+ Kd8 37 g7 wins.> That only workes if Black plays 35...Ke8??; but after 35...Bf6 or Qf6 White is just 2 pieces down.
Feb-14-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.Qc2] 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 31 fxg6+ Kg7 32 Rxf8 Kxf8 33 Qxe4 Bg5 34 Bxd6+!! Qxd6 35 Qf5+ Ke8 36 Qf7+ Kd8 37 g7 wins.> That only workes if Black plays 35...Ke8??; but after 35...Bf6 or Qf6 White is just 2 pieces down.> In that case 34 Bxd6+ does not work, and White must find an alternative. Instead of 34 Bxd6+, one alternative is 34 Qf3+ Kg7 35 Bxd6 Kxg6 36 Qg3 threatening 37 h4 as well as 37 Bxc7. Not 36 Qe4+? Qf5! 37 Qxf5+ Kxf5 38 Bxc7 c4! and Black appears to win.
Feb-14-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.Qc2] 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 31 fxg6+ Kg7 32 Rxf8 Kxf8 33 Qxe4 Bg5 34 Bxd6+!! Qxd6 35 Qf5+ Ke8 36 Qf7+ Kd8 37 g7 wins.> That only workes if Black plays 35...Ke8??; but after 35...Bf6 or Qf6 White is just 2 pieces down.> In that case 34 Bxd6+ does not work, and White must find an alternative. Instead of 34 Bxd6+, one alternative is 34 Qf3+ Kg7 35 Bxd6 Kxg6 36 Qg3 threatening 37 h4 as well as 37 Bxc7.>

It fails to 36...Nxd5 - 37.h4 Ne3! 38.hxg5 Nf5 or 37.Bxc5 Nf4 with the threat Qd1+ (not 37...Qxa4?? 38.Qd3+ followed by Qxd5) 38.Bxb4 Qxa4; or more simply 38...Qd1+ 39.Be1 Nd3. Engine evaluations here reach the -4 zone in favor of Black. But g5 might not be the ideal place for the bishop, since it allows 34.h4 with a gain of tempo - 33...Bd4 would seem to kill White's chances even more efficiently, e.g. 34.Qf3+ Kg7 35.Bxd6 Bxb2 and the evaluation is getting close to -4 again.

Feb-14-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: On [26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.Qc2] 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 31 fxg6+ Kg7 32 Rxf8 Kxf8 33 Qxe4 Bg5 34 Bxd6+!! Qxd6 35 Qf5+ Ke8 36 Qf7+ Kd8 37 g7 wins.> That only workes if Black plays 35...Ke8??; but after 35...Bf6 or Qf6 White is just 2 pieces down.> In that case 34 Bxd6+ does not work, and White must find an alternative. Instead of 34 Bxd6+, one alternative is 34 Qf3+ Kg7 35 Bxd6 Kxg6 36 Qg3 threatening 37 h4 as well as 37 Bxc7.> It fails to 36...Nxd5 - 37.h4 Ne3! 38.hxg5 Nf5 or 37.Bxc5 Nf4 with the threat Qd1+ (not 37...Qxa4?? 38.Qd3+ followed by Qxd5) 38.Bxb4 Qxa4; or more simply 38...Qd1+ 39.Be1 Nd3. Engine evaluations here reach the -4 zone in favor of Black. But g5 might not be the ideal place for the bishop, since it allows 34.h4 with a gain of tempo - 33...Bd4 would seem to kill White's chances even more efficiently, e.g. 34.Qf3+ Kg7 35.Bxd6 Bxb2 and the evaluation is getting close to -4 again.> On 37 h4 Ne3 38 hxg5 Nf5 39 Qg4! Qxd6 40 gxh6+ Kxh6 White has 41 Qxf5. On 33...Bd4 an alternative to 34 Qf3+ is 34 Bf4 eg 34...Bg7 35 g4 and Black seems a bit tied up
Feb-14-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <On 37 h4 Ne3 38 hxg5 Nf5 39 Qg4! Qxd6 40 gxh6+ Kxh6 White has 41 Qxf5.> And Black has 41...Qd1+ 42.Kh2 Qh5+ forcing an exchange of queens and transition into a won pawn endgame (the advance of Black's 'c' and 'b' pawns is decisive); 39...h5 is another easy win.

<On 33...Bd4 an alternative to 34 Qf3+ is 34 Bf4 eg 34...Bg7 35 g4 and Black seems a bit tied up> If Black wants to defend h6 (though he can even play 34...Bxb2 immediately without any worries), 34...Kg7 would be more natural, otherwise Bd4 doesn't make sense. Next Bxb2 or Qe8 are coming and White doesn't have anything real to show for the piece.

Feb-17-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <On 37 h4 Ne3 38 hxg5 Nf5 39 Qg4! Qxd6 40 gxh6+ Kxh6 White has 41 Qxf5.> And Black has 41...Qd1+ 42.Kh2 Qh5+ forcing an exchange of queens and transition into a won pawn endgame (the advance of Black's 'c' and 'b' pawns is decisive); 39...h5 is another easy win. <On 33...Bd4 an alternative to 34 Qf3+ is 34 Bf4 eg 34...Bg7 35 g4 and Black seems a bit tied up> If Black wants to defend h6 (though he can even play 34...Bxb2 immediately without any worries), 34...Kg7 would be more natural, otherwise Bd4 doesn't make sense. Next Bxb2 or Qe8 are coming and White doesn't have anything real to show for the piece.> White may have to look for an alternative earlier. One is ( after 26.Kh1 Rxe4! 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.Qc2] 29...Bd4 30 f5 Bxe3 ) 31 Qxe4 and now on 31..Bd4 32 fxg6+ Kg7 33 Bf4 avoids exchanging Rooks and threatens 34 Bxh6+
Feb-17-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <White may have to look for an alternative earlier.> Yes he does, but that should be before 24.f4?... After 31.Qxe4 Bd4 32.fxg6+ Kg7 33.Bf4 Qe8 or Rf6 there's still no shred of compensation for White.

Feb-17-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <White may have to look for an alternative earlier.> Yes he does, but that should be before 24.f4?... After 31.Qxe4 Bd4 32.fxg6+ Kg7 33.Bf4 Qe8 or Rf6 there's still no shred of compensation for White.> How about this alternative :26.Kh1 Rxe4 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.f5 gxf5 30 Qe2 (threatening Nxf5 followed by Qxe4) and if 30...Kg8 31 Qh5 overpowering the f pawn
Feb-17-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: How about this alternative :26.Kh1 Rxe4 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.f5 gxf5 30 Qe2 (threatening Nxf5 followed by Qxe4) and if 30...Kg8 31 Qh5 overpowering the f pawn>

<30...Kh8> is more precise in this line, since then Black doesn't have to worry in several lines about Nxh6 with check after Nxf5. So 30...Kh8 31.Qh5 Qf7; now White can win a pawn or even two, but so can Black - and all the lines seem to be leading to a lost endgame for White, who remains at least a pawn down with Black having at least one advanced passer. For example:

32.Rxf5 Qxh5 33.Rxh5 Ne8 34.h3 (knight can't move because of Rf1#; 34.b3 c4!) 34...Bxb2 35.Rxh6+ Kg8 36.Re6 b3

32.Qxf7 Rxf7:

33.Nxf5 Nxd5 34.Bxd6 Bxb2 35.Bxc5 b3

33.Bxd6 Nxd5 34.Nxd5 Rd7 35.Bxc5 (35.Rxf5 Rxd6 36.b3 c4!) 35...Rxd5 36.Bxb4 Bxb2

33.b3 Bd4 34.Nxf5 Nxd5 35.Bxd6 h5

Feb-18-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: How about this alternative :26.Kh1 Rxe4 27.Rxe4 fxe4 28.Ne3 Rf8 29.f5 gxf5 30 Qe2 (threatening Nxf5 followed by Qxe4) and if 30...Kg8 31 Qh5 overpowering the f pawn> <30...Kh8> is more precise in this line, since then Black doesn't have to worry in several lines about Nxh6 with check after Nxf5. So 30...Kh8 31.Qh5 Qf7; now White can win a pawn or even two, but so can Black - and all the lines seem to be leading to a lost endgame for White, who remains at least a pawn down with Black having at least one advanced passer.> On 30...Kh8 31 Nc4 may be better than 31 Qh5 eg 31..Nxd5 32 Bxd6. Another possibility is 30 Nc4 (with the Q still on d2) 30...Rf6 31 Bh4 Rg6 32 Ne3 and the Rook cannot go back to f6 to defend the f5 pawn.
Feb-25-12  master of defence: Good game. A possible continuation of this game: 34. Qd7+ Re7 35. Qg4 Ne2+ 36. Qxe2 Qxe2 37. Re1 Qxe1+ 38. Bxe1 Rxe1+ 39. Kf2 Rb1 and it´s all over.
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