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Nigel Short vs Ivan Cheparinov
"Forced his Hand" (game of the day Jul-15-12)
Corus (Group B) (2008)  ·  Sicilian Defense: Najdorf. Opocensky Variation Traditional Line (B92)  ·  1-0
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Last move:

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 24 OF 24 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Feb-23-10  dumbgai: Heh, Cheparinov was never the same again after this game.
Jan-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Maatalkko: <dumbgai> Ah, there is still time for Cheparinov to become World Champion.
Jul-15-12  LoveThatJoker: GG

LTJ

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Everyone except me seems to know the story behind this game. What happened?
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Riverbeast: According to the chessbase report, Nigel Short showed up 10 minutes late for this game. This is the same guy who claimed that anyone showing up more than 5 minutes late for a game should be forfeited....>

Under such a rule, there was a strong New England player who would have either mended his ways or forfeited many a game; it was routine for him to show up 15-30 minutes late, back in the day.

Jul-15-12  Alien Math: <FSR>

To shake or Not to shake? FIDE answers the Question. http://blog.chess.com/Chessbuff/to-...

They don't seem to have a problem enforcing it upon the folk at Corus 2008 right now. In Group B, Nigel Short went to the arbiter for his Round 8 game against Ivan Cheparinov due to Cheparinov refusing to shake hands with him. The game was quickly forfeited, giving Short the point.

Corus 2008 | reaction Danailov after no-handshake incident http://youtu.be/0Rsm3fWvRQ8

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Alien Math> Thanks. And I gather that someone overturned that decision, Short vs I Cheparinov, 2008, and so this game was belatedly played.
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: Remind us why Cheparinov refused to shake in the first place?
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Shams> Dunno. Here's an article on the controversy, but it doesn't explain Cheparinov's (in)action: http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <FSR> I vaguely remember that Short said some candid and unflattering things (no, really) about Topalov and Danailov. I think this incident was Cheparinov's response.
Jul-15-12  Cibator: I've never understood all this current hoo-hah about arriving a wee bit after the scheduled start time. I mean - who's disadvantaged when it does happen? The one who turns up late, of course! By all means default him if it's an hour or more, as used to be the case. But a couple of minutes?? Get over it!!
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Cibator> Fair enough; that strikes me as a mite obsessive, and I'm the type who's always on time for appointments, etc.
Jul-15-12  Qxf7: <shams>

He did it for the same reason Short showed up late for the match. It's a deliberate display of poor-sportsmanship and contempt, designed to screw with the opponent's mental state.

Some very strong players are particularly vulnerable to this sort of thing because of their psychological makeup. Fischer was notoriously weak in this area, as are Topalov, Short and Kramnik.

Other players won't bat an eyelash. Kasparov tried this sort of thing on Anad a few years back and it barely even registered. Ditto Korchornoi, Ivanchuck and Carlsen.

Jul-15-12  Dionysius1: And Kasparov arrived pointedly late for a game with Carlsen when he was 13. The game was a draw, and K went through his staring, head shaking bit too. I wonder how much of that was natural, and how much of it meant as a distraction?
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jim Bartle: I don't know, but Kasparov did the same staring, shifting, head shaking, etc. when he played Deep Blue, and I don't think that would have distracted DB.
Jul-15-12  psmith: <WhiteRook48> and <znsprdx> give flawed analysis. After 78. Kf6 in <WhiteRook48>'s line, 78... Kh7! (rather than 78... Kf8) draws! The only winning line is 78. Kh6! (since there is an e-file but no i-file). Similarly for 79. Kf6 in <znsprdx>'s line.
Jul-15-12  Dionysius1: <Jim> thanks - that settles it in my head, at least about the body stuff. I do think turning up late against a 13 year old is a bit off - glad he didn't win. I know the argument that if Carlsen's old enough to play with the supergrandmasters, he's old enough to take the bad behaviour. (Doesn't convince me though).
Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: < Jim Bartle: I don't know, but Kasparov did the same staring, shifting, head shaking, etc. when he played Deep Blue....>

One that always got me was John Nunn's description of Kasparov's typical reaction to an unexpected move, wherein he curls his lip and/or some other mannerism I don't recollect at the moment. In one of their games, Gazza gave what Nunn described as 'a force-ten lip curl....'

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  SuperPatzer77: < psmith: <WhiteRook48> and <znsprdx> give flawed analysis. After 78. Kf6 in <WhiteRook48>'s line, 8... Kh7! (rather than 78... Kf8) draws! The only winning line is 8. Kh6! (since there is an e-file but no i-file). Similarly for 9. Kf6 in <znsprdx>'s line. >

<psmith> You're correct about your analysis

White to move and win - see diagram #1 below:


click for larger view

What's White's best move??? See below:

1. Kh6! Kh8, 2. g6 Kg8, 3. g7

Another interesting diagram #2 - White to move and win below:


click for larger view

What's White's best move??? See below:

1. Ka6! Ka8, 2. b6 Kg8, 3. b7

Very interesting pawn endings!!

SuperPatzer77

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: Here's Danailov's explanation for the non-shake:

<Official appeal by Ivan Cheparinov

Dear All,

Today during the start of the round the following accident happened.

Mr. Cheparinov refused to shake hands with Mr. Short before the game.

The reason was: some time ago in one of his interviews Mr. Short insulted him and our team gravely [snip].>

http://chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp...

Anyone have the mentioned interview of Short insulting Chep?

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  pawn to QB4: http://www.dnaindia.com/sport/repor...

<Nigel Short, a former world championship finalist, tells DNA that Topalov could have received external help. “It is my understanding that the majority of players in San Luis privately believe that Topalov received signalling from Danailov during play. The essence of these allegations, which I heard personally from disgruntled players in Argentina at the time, was not that Topalov constantly received computer advice but only at critical junctures. Indeed, if one were to cheat, a player of Topalov’s strength would only need two or three computer moves per game to put him at an overwhelming advantage vis-a-vis his opponents.”>

here's one version of what you're looking for. I don't think Short ever committed himself further than this. Cheparinov's response was to refuse to shake Short's hand. I recall thinking at the time that Short wiped him out, not only OTB, but by turning up late and leaving the poor guy sitting there with the cameras on him until Short arrived for the handshake.

Jul-15-12  hedgeh0g: <I don't know, but Kasparov did the same staring, shifting, head shaking, etc. when he played Deep Blue, and I don't think that would have distracted DB.>

In the end, he just poured cola over it and stormed off.

Jul-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <FSR: <Alien Math> Thanks. And I gather that someone overturned that decision, Short vs I Cheparinov, 2008, and so this game was belatedly played.>

<FSR>: My recollection is that the arbiters gave Cheparinov the option to play the game the next day, provided he would agree to shake hands with Short before the re-play game, which condition Cheparinov accepted. I believe that Short essentially approved this ruling (in any case, did not object), and he certainly rose to the occasion with a fine game that garnered the full point.

Jul-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Peligroso Patzer> Short certainly played well, but according to this article the ruling that Cheparinov would be allowed to (re)play the game made Short "incandescent with rage." http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...
Jul-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White will manoever and capture the black pawn and be in the PERFECT position to win.
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