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Teimour Radjabov vs Peter Leko
Morelia-Linares (2008), Linares ESP, rd 8, Feb-28
Queen's Indian Defense: Fianchetto. Nimzowitsch Variation (E15)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Tough game!
Feb-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: The most exciting game of round 8 was a draw!
Feb-28-08  percyblakeney: It looks like Radjabov's draw offer was a mistake, he seemed to have good winning chances after his interesting piece sacrifice in the opening, but was down to seconds for his last 6-7 moves before the time control and chose the safety first approach in the end.
Feb-28-08  Jim Bartle: Hey, acirce, another sleep-inducing Leko draw!!
Feb-28-08  Jim Bartle: You know, the phrase "a dead draw" is not the first thought that sprang to my mind upon espying the final position.
Feb-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: As in the game with Aronian, Leko faced here a very sharp prepared line by his opponent starting with <10.Qe4> (10.Rd1 is the standard move, as played in Aronian vs Leko, 2008 at Corus). But this time Leko played even faster then Radja at this stage of the game, so he was probably prepared as well. Chessbase database contains one game from 2007 between 2 obscure players where this move has already been tried and White was winning material after 10...Qc7 11.Nh4 O-O 12.Nf5 Bf6 13.Rd1 (an immediate 10...0-0 would also be bad because of 11.Rd1).
Feb-28-08  Jim Bartle: I'd be interested if we could find a strong player/kibitzer who believes in white's (final) position, and another who believes in black's. I'd really like to see them play this one out.
Feb-28-08  MarkusKann: One question, what is the reason, for Radjabov sacrifice the Knigth on g6??, what reason to move that or what is the advantage for that??
Feb-28-08  MarkusKann: Is just destroy the king's side pawns and get a passed pawn for that??
Feb-28-08  whatthefat: I really do struggle to understand how - with all the improvements to the modern game, and the level of training and preparation that goes into it - the best players in the world still get in to time trouble no less frequently than the average club player.
Feb-29-08  percyblakeney: Chessdom reports that the players analysed the game for more than an hour afterwards, and by then I think they both agreed that this was a bit of a lucky escape for Leko. White seems to have missed several good possibilities in time trouble, for example 34. h5 Rg5 35. Qh7 b4 36. f4 Rg7 37. Qxg7 Nxg7 38. h6:


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This was an exciting game, and it was nice to see that knight sacrifice that did come close to win it in the end. Barsky gives the final move a question mark at Chesspro but that does seem harsh. Radjabov had less than ten seconds left by then, but I doubt that 39. a4 is bad. It's a very complicated final position, but given enough time the engines favour white. To actually win it is a different matter though...

Feb-29-08  ahmadov: <percyblakeney> Very good comments on the game... I just wondered who was better at the end of the game... It seems that the game is not completely equal in the final position...
Feb-29-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <It seems that the game is not completely equal in the final position...> No, it looks better for White. Still, perhaps Black can somehow hold it together with 39...Nf6 - e.g. 40.Qf7 (40.Qh8+ Kd7 41.Nxb5 Nxb5 42.axb5 Ng4 43.h7 Rd2+ with perpetual) 40...b4 41.h7 Nxh7 42.Nd5 Rxd5 43.Qxd5+ Ke8 44.Qa8+ Bd8 45.Qa7 Nf8 46.Qxc5 Nfe6.
Feb-29-08  ahmadov: <Eyal: <It seems that the game is not completely equal in the final position...> No, it looks better for White. Still, perhaps Black can somehow hold it together with 39...Nf6 - e.g. 40.Qf7 (40.Qh8+ Kd7 41.Nxb5 Nxb5 42.axb5 Ng4 43.h7 Rd2+ with perpetual) 40...b4 41.h7 Nxh7 42.Nd5 Rxd5 43.Qxd5+ Ke8 44.Qa8+ Bd8 45.Qa7 Nf8 46.Qxc5 Nfe6.> Good, thanks...
Feb-29-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  rogge: Too bad they didn't play this one out.
Feb-29-08  Jim Bartle: Are you kidding, rogge? The position is played out: total material balance, symmetrical pawn structure, no passed pawns...
Feb-29-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <As in the game with Aronian, Leko faced here a very sharp prepared line by his opponent starting with 10.Qe4 ... But this time Leko played even faster then Radja at this stage of the game, so he was probably prepared as well.>

According to chessvibes (http://www.chessvibes.com/tournamen...), Leko said that he was indeed prepared for the 10.Qe4 idea and was actually tempting Radja to sacrifice on g6. Later, he missed the strong intermediate move 22.Qg7!: <After the immediate 22.e5 then 22...Kc8! is strong, e.g. 23.Bxb7+ (23.Rxd6 Qxe5 24.Rxf6 Bxg2 25.Kxg2 Qh5) 23...Kxb7 24.exd6 Ncd5> - though it should be noted that there's no more than a draw for Black here, since after 25.Qg7+ Ka6 (25...Kc6 26.Nxd5 Nxd5 27.Rxd5! Kxd5 (27...Qxd5 28.Qc7#) 28.Qb7+ etc.) 26.a4 White can at least force a perpetual. Also, after 22…Kc8, 23.exd6 would fail to 23...Bxg2 24.Kxg2 Qh3+.

Feb-29-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: http://webcast.chessclub.com/Linare... - Radjabov explains why he offered a draw.
Feb-29-08  Whitehat1963: What happens if 17. Nc3?
Mar-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  parmetd: move 25 what happens if Rxd6+ Qxd6 Qxf6+ (threatening still Bxa8 and Rd1) I guess Qf7 interposes met by Rd1+
Mar-07-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  parmetd: I've spent sometime analyzing my suggestion in this position. I think its just a draw but I still think it was a good continuation. My line of analysis continues 25. Rxd6+ Qxd6 Qxf6+ Qe7 (if Kd7 Rd1 and black is losing, if Re7 Bxa8 and black is losing, if Kc7 Nxb5+ and black is losing therefore Qe7 is forced) Qxe7+ Rxe7 (Kxe7 Bxa8 Nxa8 Nxb5 Rb8 Nxa7 Rxb2 Kg2 and draw...) Bxa8 Nxa8 Rd1+ (Nd4 Nxb5 and similar to game conituation with queens off draw still likely) (Ke8 or Kc8 is met by Nxb5 with the a7 weak and the a8 knight possibly trapped. Blacks pieces are uncoordinated) (Kc7 is simply losing to Nd5+ forking king and rook) Rd7 Rxd7+ Kxd7 Nxb5 a6 Nc3 white has some winning chances here (black has none) but in all likely hood its just a draw.
Jul-24-09  Knight13: <whatthefat> Their moves have more at stake than club players, and so they need a lot of time to check variations before making a move that could well cost the game. Note that club players makes a lot more mistakes than these guys and often gets away with it when they play against each other but if a 2700 makes <a> mistake they're dead.
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