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Jackson Whipps Showalter vs Harry Nelson Pillsbury
"Jackson Whipps Pillsbury" (game of the day Sep-03-2016)
Buffalo (1894), Buffalo, New York USA, rd 6, Aug-17
Ponziani Opening: Steinitz Variation (C44)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 10 times; par: 45 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-31-12  Memethecat: Well 32...Rb8 33.Qb5 would've been disastrous, & 32...Qe8 doesn't help black.

32...Rb8 33. Rxa6+ Kxa6 34. Qb5+ Ka7 35. a5 Qh6 36. Ra1 is the winning line.

Aug-31-12  Memethecat: <vardeep: 32.Rxb6 is equally winning.after king moves back to a8,all you have to do is push the pawn on c6 to c7. black has no strong response after this and will be caught in a sort of zugzwang..> I think with blacks B & R both aiming at c8, together with pressure on the g file, unfortunately this wont work, its not winning in the same "forced" way as 32.Rxa5
Aug-31-12  MATTYMONKEES: I'm surprised this one was rated so difficult. Even I found the solution, which says something.
Aug-31-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Or you are getting better at solving these?
Aug-31-12  James D Flynn: White is the exchange up but Black can win it back on his next move unless the R on b5 moves, Black can also work up an attack by h4 and f4 if given time. White can create attacking chances against the Black K by sacrificing the R on B5, Candidates Rxa5, Rxb6, Qd7.

32.Rxa5 bxa5 33.Rb1 e3(if Rb8 34,Rxb8 Kxb8 35.Qd8+ Ka7 36.Qxc7+ Ka8 37.Qb6 Bc8 38.c7 Bb7 39.Qxa5+ Ba6 40.Qxa6#)34.Qc5+ Ka8 35.Qxa5 exf2+ 36.Kxf2 Ka7(Blacks only check is Qxg3 and after hxg3 he is out) 37.Rb7+ Ka8 Qxa6#.

32.Rxb6 cxb6 33.Qe7+ Ka8 34.Rb1 Qg7 35.Rxb6 Bc8 and the Q exchange is forced which ends the attack, Black emerges with a piece up.

32.Qd7 Rc8(if Qg7 33.Qxg7 Rxg7 34,Rxf5 White remains the exchange up and will win at least another P, leaving White with an easily won ending)33.Rxb6 Kxb6 34.Qd5 Ka7 35.Qc5+ Ka8 36.Qxa5 Ka7 37.Rb1 Rb8 38.Qxc7+ Bb7 39.Rxb7+ Rxb7 40.Qxb7#

Aug-31-12  jancotianno: I had never heard of Jackson Showalter before this brilliant puzzle. <LoveThatJoker> i found 35. Qxc7+ and analysed it to a win as well.
Aug-31-12  LoveThatJoker: <jancotianno> That's great to hear!

Indeed, 35. Qxc7+ is also winning for White!

LTJ

Aug-31-12  Marmot PFL: I was sure that 32 Rxb6 would work, but it only draws.
Aug-31-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: It looks like the Pillsbury "doughboy" is about to receive a bad roll from the rolling pin of queen and rook.
Aug-31-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Soften these hard times against the back drop after ba6 now see rooka5 to snatch I'm queen a c5 in you whirled ernest it frown line on a5 has right rook a6 trapped rookb1 seal the deal it do you ghosting boy got queenxc7 or b7 rook ables it finish, is knickers in a twist now charge h7 in question? double quick time g6 allows angle once b8 pb5 ne7 ne5 rf6 bg5 and in flipflop it furnace in blacks tomb engraved 1-0 since g3 remedy stops immediate cascades pawn it among in block queen path for c5 a5 round up lick at e1 b1 threatening to b7+ or ko in us c7+.
Aug-31-12  vardeep: <James D Flynn:> <32.Rxb6 cxb6 33.Qe7+ Ka8 34.Rb1 Qg7 35.Rxb6 Bc8 and the Q exchange is forced which ends the attack, Black emerges with a piece up.>... well.. 34.Rb1 loses tempo for white and allows queen exchange. instead 34.c6-c7 is the correct move and also winning. i'm not able to come up with even one black response that will blunt this attack. of course 32.Rxa5 is more obvious and clearly winning .but 32.Rxb6 line when fully explored is also not bad at all..
Aug-31-12  joegalby: jackson whipps pillsbury
Aug-31-12  vardeep: < Memethecat: I think with blacks B & R both aiming at c8, together with pressure on the g file, unfortunately this wont work, its not winning in the same "forced" way as 32.Rxa5>.. well yes indeed 32.Rxa5 is clearly more straight forward. but pls do enlighten me more on the drawing chances in 32.Rxb6 line if possible. i.e the correct move order which would result in a draw.. i was not able to see any... even if both rook and bishop is protecting c8 . it does not matter. in fact c8 is unimportant.black king is tied down coz of tht c7 pawn and it'll stay there.
Aug-31-12  Memethecat: <vardeep> The idea is: if you have a winning line show it. You cant just say <32.Rxb6 is equally winning.after king moves back to a8,all you have to do is push the pawn on c6 to c7> Where is it winning? as it stands white is down a R.

A pawn on c7 means nothing unless you can convert it into mate or a material advantage.

Its like starting the game & saying: Just trap blacks K on the back rank then move the Q to a good square ready to mate, easy! You have to write down the moves to show your idea is sound, not just say it is.

Aug-31-12  vardeep: <Memethecat>..alright.. now i got it.i was analyzing all the lines with 32.Rxb6 and i found out why it'll fail.. its because after 34.c7 black can respond with 34.Qe8 and the attack fizzles out coz queen exchange is now inevitable .( of course any other response and black is in trouble).. so yes.. 32.Rxa5 is the only winning move..
Aug-31-12  M.Hassan: "Difficult" White to play 32.?
White has a Rook for a Bishop.

I have gone a long and tedious line as follows:

32.Rxb6 cxb6
<if ...Kxb6 33.Qc5#>

33.Qd7+ Ka8
34.Rb1 Qg7
<if...Rg7 35.Qd8+ Ka7 36.Qxb6+ Ka8 37.Qb8#>

35.Qxf5 Qf7
36.Qxe4 Rg4
37.Qe8+ Ka7
38.Qxh5 Rg5
39.Qf3 Bc8
40.c4 Bg4
41.Qxf6 Rf5
42.Rh4 Bf3
43.d5
I am not sure if I am right. This is the position after 43.d5


click for larger view

White has managed to disarm Black of many of his pawns and he has two passed pawns and overall looks in better position. Time to check and thank in advance of any comments.

Aug-31-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I liked the analysis of <Once> concerning the 32. Rxa5 Rb8 33. Rxa6+ Kxa6 34. Qb5+ Ka7 35. a5 line.


click for larger view

It took me a while to figure out that 35 a5 was better than 35 Ra1, even though both are clearly winning.

35 a5 is better as it prevents 35...axb5??, because of 36 Qxa5# .

It also prevents 35...Ra8 which pins white's rook if he follows with 36 a5. If 36...Kb8 follows, then 37 axb6 is not playable.

Having said all of that I also liked 32. Rxa5 Rb8 33. Qxf5 as an absolutely winning alternative to 33 Rxa6+.


click for larger view

Aug-31-12  1stboard: Wow, a rare Pillsbury loss ......
Aug-31-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Rare loss?

Pillsbury actually lost 20% of his tournament and match games.

It is what it is.

Aug-31-12  nariga: 32.Rxa5 e3 seems to be a strong counterattack for black.

33.Rxa6+ Kxa6 34.Qb5+ Ka7 35.Rxe3 f4 etc

Aug-31-12  Tiggler: <Jimfromprovidence> <Having said all of that I also liked 32. Rxa5 Rb8 33. Qxf5 as an absolutely winning alternative to 33 Rxa6+.>

Jim, I am glad I found at least one other with a cynical streak: why be brilliant when greedy gets the job done?

Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: Black's ♕ is in a tight spot, so 15. c4 wins a piece: 15...Qxd4 (15...Nxd4 16. cxd5 Nxc2 17. dxe6 Nxa1 18. exd7+ Kxd7 19. Bb2) 16. Bb2 Qb6 17. c5 Bxc5 18. Qxc5 Qxc5 19. bxc5.
Sep-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  catlover: The "Ponziani Opening"...didn't somebody with that last name come up with a scheme?
Sep-03-16  Knight13: <catlover: The "Ponziani Opening"...didn't somebody with that last name come up with a scheme?> That's Charles Ponzi, but he didn't come up with the scheme, although it was named after him.
Sep-06-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: If this had been a cash game, the winner would have gained a lot of dough , rolling his opponent.
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