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Kjetil A Lie vs Bu Xiangzhi
Olympiad (2008), Dresden GER, rd 3, Nov-15
Caro-Kann Defense: Accelerated Panov Attack (B10)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Abu Dina>: welcome! And good to start your chessgames.com career with a win.
Aug-25-10  Abu Dina: I think Nd4 made it possible.

White had to play g5. otherwise whites king comes under check with blacks own g5.

White knew his king had to stay there. anything else and the knight and pawn on the d file are black's fodder.

Aug-25-10  Abu Dina: Once, thank you for welcoming me!

Last night was also my first night joining a local chess club.

I thoroughly enjoyed it! Can't wait till next Tuesday even though I got battered twice by the club captain! :(

Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Abu Dina> I think you will find that chess doesn't so much have a learning curves as a series of learning steps. Most folk find that they can get stuck at one level for a while, then go up in one big jump.

The difficulty seems to be in finding the stick-at-ability to hang on in there when it all seems much too hard. Many folks learn the moves, then give up the game when they get beaten easily by a slightly more experienced player.

So I wouldn't worry too much about losing to the club captain. If you can keep on playing, and learning, and <most of all> enjoying the game, it won't be long before it starts to get a whole lot easier.

Have fun :-)

Aug-25-10  TheaN: Wednesday 25 August 2010

<42.?>

Target: 2:10;000
Taken: 1:37;897

Material: =

Candidates: Nb5, <[Nf5]>

-ML-
The Black is way out of the game, it either suggests trapping it, or sacrificing our own to let the pawns do the works. The latter is the case here. White wins after:

<42.Nf5!> the obvious move is the capture but this makes the followup rather straightforward for White.

/A\
<42....gxf5 43.g6 > the Black King cannot reach the g-file due to the e6 pawn, the h-pawn is too late and the Knight even more; promotion is unstoppable. So the Black King has to move. Up the board however is not recommended seeing the pawn going up.

/B\
<42....Kc5/Kxd5 43.e7 > is quick enough. The last alternative however, will win White too much tempi.

/C\
<42....Kc7 43.d6 Kd8 44.e7 Kd7 45.Ng7 > and it is game over with e8=Q incoming. Time to check.

Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Pretty obvious that today was about finding a promotion tactic, which made 42.Nf5+ fairly easy to spot.

Capturing the knight springs our g-pawn to run, while moving the king out of check springs the central pawns. Nice puzzle.

Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The knight pawn needs to be sprung to advance and the knight sac at f5 is the springer-(pun intended).

Easier by far than yesterday-oh,by the way the "decoy" solution turned out to be correct,as black in fact resigned. A positive side of unintended consequences---or double blindness.

Aug-25-10  M.Hassan: 42.Nf5 is the winner
42......Kxd5 or Kc7 or gxf5
White can promote a pawn
Aug-25-10  ZUGZWANG67: Knight endgame where material is even. Black has a protected passed pawn and White 2 connected passers. The main difference between W & B lies in the position of the Knights: W's one is very active while the black one is practically off the board.

42.Nf5+ and:

a) 42...gxf5 43.g6 Ke7 44.g7 and 45.g8Q.
b) 42...Kc7!? 43.d6+;
b1) 43...Kc8 44.e7 Kd7 45.Ng7;
b2) 43...Kd8 44.e7+ Ke8(d7) 45.Ng7(+)

I think this is it.
Time to check.

----------

Ok. At least one resolved. After yesterday's debandade and after having missed h5 sunday I needed this one. :0)

Aug-25-10  ZUGZWANG67: <Abu Dina: Once, thank you for welcoming me!

Last night was also my first night joining a local chess club.

I thoroughly enjoyed it! Can't wait till next Tuesday even though I got battered twice by the club captain! :(>

<Once: <Abu Dina> I think you will find that chess doesn't so much have a learning curves as a series of learning steps. Most folk find that they can get stuck at one level for a while, then go up in one big jump. The difficulty seems to be in finding the stick-at-ability to hang on in there when it all seems much too hard. Many folks learn the moves, then give up the game when they get beaten easily by a slightly more experienced player.

So I wouldn't worry too much about losing to the club captain. If you can keep on playing, and learning, and <most of all> enjoying the game, it won't be long before it starts to get a whole lot easier.

Have fun :-)>

And I would add to <Once>'s excellent advises that it would be a great idea to play often <and> solving whenever you have time. ChessGames provides us with a huge advantage: that of being able to analyse and exchange with others chess enthousiasts.

But I think it's not enough. One needs to solve often. Here are 2 strong tools to help you doing so. One features 10000(!) puzzles from GM games. Some of them are challenging. The second one provides more trivial exercices adapted to your rating (the site provides it's own ratings) and the possibily to fight the clock. This site has more than 23000(!!) puzzles.

http://www.wtharvey.com/index.html

http://chess.emrald.net/index.php

I hope this will help you in your improving process.

Peace!

Aug-25-10  Justawoodpusher: For me endgame puzzles are comparably more easy to solve then a middle game puzzle of the same day of the week. This one was no exception. Do others have the same feeling?
Aug-25-10  MiCrooks: The supposed improvement on move 39 of a6 really doesn't help. Crafty is doing this to try to activate the Knight via b5 but that move simply loses. So after a6 White continues Kf4 and if Nb5 Nxb5! wins easily despite pawn majorities on both sides of the board. The Queenside one is now stopped with the doubled isolated pawns and the Kingside one will be eaten up by the White King.

It is a fine example of just how powerful a pair of passed pawns are in a King and pawn endgame. The Black King is tied to the pawns and is helpless to do anything about them while the White King is free to roam.

Aug-25-10  Bignevermo: HEY GUYS/GALS...this is only my second time doing the daily puzzle.(hey i got this one) yesterdays messed me up! i am just a rookie who was taught about 30 years ago... and for some reason i wanted to get some mind stimulation in..i used to think i was smart...ha!!. this is a great forum for me and i really appreciate the kibitzing... thanks people!
Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Bignevermo> Hello, and welcome. I wouldn't worry too much about yesterday's puzzle. It was unusually tough for a Tuesday.
Aug-25-10  David2009: <MiCrooks: The supposed improvement on move 39 of a6 really doesn't help. [snip] after a6 White continues Kf4 and if Nb5 Nxb5! wins easily.> You are right. 39...a6 40.Kf4 seems to win.


click for larger view

No better is 40...Nb1 41.d6 Nc3 42.e7 Nd5+ 43.Ke4 Nxe7 44.d7.

So we have to look further and earlier for <a decisive improvement in Black's defence>, as sought in my earlier post (K Lie vs Bu Xiangzhi, 2008). It is interesting that Black outgraded White by 188 ELO points. On my reckoning this means that White, the winner of this game, should have scored only about 13% in a long match. Triumph of the underdog!

Aug-25-10  VincentL: <Justawoodpusher>For a mid-week puzzle I agree. Today's first move was obvious (not a single kibitzer chose anything else); in contrast a cluttered position could have various candidate moves, and then one can lose time working through lines, only to realise that one should have started with a different move.

But at more advanced levels endgame puzzles can be very taxing. Some are practically impossible to solve without silicon assistance. I remember one Sunday puzzle about four months ago with just a few pawns and a couple of minor pieces on the board. As I recall not a single kibitzer solved it (and the game continuation ended in a draw although it should have been a win for white).

Aug-25-10  MiCrooks: Ratings, especially for youngsters, can move around quite a bit. In this case Lie had peaked a year earlier at 2563 and was hitting a local minimum at the time of the Olympiad. Xiangzhi on the other hand was peaking as 2714 was his high rating and has since dropped down to 2676.

Still a significant difference but not quite as much as it would otherwise appear. The other unknown factor here is how the boards were standing. It may have caused Xiangzhi to take risks he otherwise might not have in order to try to win the game with Black.

Norway ended up winning the round 2.5 to 1.5 which would have been an upset. Other intesesting facts: this was Bu's first round of the Olypiad (even though it was round 3), it was played on board 2 (Magnus was on board one but all of the rest of Norway's team were 2500 players), Wang Yue drew Magnus on board 1, and boards 3 and 4 were draws as well. This game determined the outcome of the round. Bu performance rating for the Olympiad (he played 9 rounds) was only 2616 while Lie's performance rating through 8 games split between boards 2 and 3 was 2651.

Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: White Panovs coping again, knights flight ally Shanghai noon time. G5 boo to a goose that Kjetil won cruise control? Kc7 and black horse is so off-side. In middle pose Nf5, funny isnt it how greek sac pops up? Do screening king nets the point. Try dent Kf4 eloft gums up the works. Wills on g5 imperial guard passing h5. In the knight shepherds, hands black flock in sea. Defence calmed fanned knight shoot king from hip.
Aug-25-10  turbo231: <justawoodpusher: do others have the same feeling?

Yes

Aug-25-10  EXIDE: I got this one. So far perfect for this week. last week I missed Mon thru Wed. I usually do not get the final two of the week. My problem seems to be that when there are too many pieces on the board I get very confused.
Aug-25-10  cjgone: My problem seems to be that when there are too many pieces on the board I get very confused.

----

Yeah, it feels more like a test of how well you can see pieces on the board rather than how well you can calculate.

Aug-25-10  FISCHERboy: 40...Nb1 41.d6 Nc3 42.e7 Nd5+ 43.Ke4 Nxe7 44.d7.
Can't find winning combination. resignation is the last resort.
Aug-25-10  muralman: justwoodpusher and VincentL I agree that the end games are easier than middle games. This one was a cinch. My problem with the puzzles are the middle games. When there are 15 and more moves left, I can't see the point, given all the variables. Then, I see people claiming victory when they get the first move. I can't think that way. I want a final answer.
Aug-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's Wednesday solution, 42. Nf5+! sacrifices a Knight in the endgame to facilitate the decisive advance of White's passed pawns.
Aug-25-10  Formula7: 42.Nf5+ and now;

A) 42...Kxd5/Kc5 43.e7 followed by 44.e8=Q

B) 42...gxf5 43.g6 Ke7 44.g7 followed by 45.g8=Q

C) 42...Kc7 43.d6+ Kd8 44.e7+ and whether Black plays 44...Ke8 or 44...Kd7, White plays 45.Ng7 and 46.e8=Q

Time to check.

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