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Eckhard Schmittdiel vs Thomas Ernst
Gausdal (1987), Gausdal NOR
Sicilian Defense: Alapin Variation. Barmen Defense (B22)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Annotations by Stockfish (Computer).      [204 more games annotated by Stockfish]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: 22.Qh6! annihilates Black.
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  jith1207: wasn't the usual difficult, but had its moments with back rank mate threat in line for white itself. It was difficult while trying to take on h7, however once the focus turns to g7 with two immediate mating options with rook to back up when needed, it plays itself out.
Oct-06-17  theo77: I chose a line like that 23. Nxe7+
Kh8
24. Rg3.....
Oct-06-17  saturn2: I went quickly for 23 Qh6 and looked at the answers 23..hxQ 24 Nxh6+ and 23..Bf6 24 Bxf6 hxQ 25 Nxh6+
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The first three moves 22. Qh6 Qg4 23. Rg3 Bf6 24. Bxf6 exf6 (diagram below) almost played themselves.


click for larger view

However, here (diagram above) I had to recalculate to find mate-in-three with 25. Qxg7+ Qxg7 26. Rxg7+ Kh8 27. Rg6#.

P.S.: For an early improvement, Black might ought to consider replacing 12...Bd7 13. Bf4 ± with 12...a6 ⩲ to = as in black's win in M Tscharotschkin vs D Boskovic, 2011.

Oct-06-17  Walter Glattke: Also win 22.Nh6+/Bxg7/Nxg7/Nxe7+/Rg3
Several solutions here.
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: <Several solutions here.> But only one that actually works.
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: I got this through Rg3. I didn't see ahead to the Black defense that staved off the most immediate mate while threatening backrank mate of his own.

I did look at other lines in which Qg7+ played an important role.

The beautiful thing about Rg3 is that Black can't quickly unpin the g-pawn, because ... Kh8 just gets it caught in a different pin. I was surprised that Black even had as much defense as he did .

Oct-06-17  Cybe: Walter Glattke: Also win 22.Nh6+/Bxg7/Nxg7/Nxe7+/Rg3 Several solutions here.

22. Nh6+ draws, 22. B:g7 loses quickly, 22. N:e7+ loses quickly, 22. Rg3 loses slowly.

Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Poor play by Black

For someone with a PHD in mathematics, this whole line just doesn't add up

*****

Oct-06-17  saturn2: Cybe 22. N:e7+ looses quickly, >
How?
a. 22.. Kh8 23 Qh6 Qg4 24 Rg3
b. 22.. RxNe7 23 Qg5 f6 24 Bxf6
Oct-06-17  mel gibson: I wish I would have looked longer
as I might have seen it.
I was too busy looking at the white: Bishop, Knight or Rook moving.

The computer agrees and says mate in 7.

22. Qh6 (22. Qh6 (♕h5-h6 ♕c4-g4 ♖h3-g3 e6xf5
♖g3xg4 ♗e7-f6 ♕h6xf6 ♘f8-e6 ♖g4xg7+ ♔g8-h8 ♖g7-g6+ ♘e6-g7 ♕f6xg7+) +M7/17 4)

Oct-06-17  Cybe: saturn2: Cybe 22. N:e7+ looses quickly, >
How?
a. 22.. Kh8 23 Qh6 Qg4 24 Rg3
b. 22.. RxNe7 23 Qg5 f6 24 Bxf6

22... Kh8 - you must be joking. 22... R:e7 and White loses. If 23. Qg5, 23... Ng6!

Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Here we see the Importance of Beating Ernst!

What a Wilde game.

Oct-06-17  saturn2: < Cybe> you said after 22 NxRe7 white <looses quickly>. So show us please how?
Oct-06-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The losing move appears to be 17...Bc8? allowing 18. Rh3! +- (+2.27 @ 30 depth, Stockfish 8.)

Instead, 17...g6 18. h4 Bb5 ± (+1.08 @ 31 depth, Stockfish) improves Black's survival chances

Oct-06-17  Pasker: I found the Qh6 easily. The follow up was mind blowing. I didn't see that all.
Oct-06-17  Dave12: 22.♘xh6+ is not good enough: gxh6 ♕xh6 f6.
Oct-06-17  NBZ: Ok tough one. Here's what I have tried.

A] 22. Nh6+ gxh6 23. Qxh6 f6 24. Rg3+ Ng6 25. Rxg6+ and White has perpetual check, but no win in sight.

B] 22. Bxg7 gxf5 23. Bxf8 looks strong (Kxf8 Qh6+ Kg8 Qxh7+ Kf8 Qh7#; Bxf8 Qxh7#). However, Black now uncorks 23. ... Bf6!! (diagram) and there seems no way for White to progress. For example, 24. Rg3+ Kh8!


click for larger view

C] 22. Nxe7+ Rxe7 23. Bxg7 and now if 23. ... Kxg7 24. Qg5+ Kh8 25. Qxe7 looks winning. Black can play 23. ... f5 but after 24. Bf6 25. Rde8 26. Rg3+ should win (e.g. 26. ... Ng6 27. Rxg6+ hxg6 28. Qh8+).

Yes I think I will go with this line.

Oct-06-17  NBZ: Ah completely missed that Nxe7+ Rxe7 Bxg7 Kxg7 Qg5+ is met by the simple Ng6!. And the idea of playing 22. Qh6 never even crossed my mind. Candidate moves!
Oct-06-17  lentil: This is far more than a Saturday puzzle. White had to see it through at least as early as 18. Rh3. 20 Nf5!! is a move (one of many!) that separates me from Grandmasters.
Oct-06-17  eblunt: What was wrong with 24 Rxg4 ?
Oct-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: <eblunt> Nothing at all wrong with snatching a free queen, Stockfish figures the best line being this

< 1) +8.87 (23 ply) 24...Bxe5 25.Nxg7 Ng6 26.Nxe8 Bh8 27.Nc7 Bxc3 28.Rb1 Rf8 29.Qe3 Bg7 30.b5 axb5 31.Nxb5 e5 32.Rg3 Bf5 33.Rc1 Be6 34.Nd6 h5 35.Qg5 h4 36.Ra3 Rb8 37.Rc7 h3 38.gxh3 >

But that still doesn't top <1) mate-in-4 (20 ply) 24.Bxf6 exf5 25.Qxg7+ Qxg7 26.Rxg7+ Kh8 27.Rg3#>

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