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Magnus Carlsen vs Teimour Radjabov
Linares (2009), Linares ESP, rd 13, Mar-06
Sicilian Defense: Nezhmetdinov-Rossolimo Attack (B30)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-06-09  jon01: Does Carlsen have a girlfriend?
Mar-06-09  JG27Pyth: I knew Carlsen was somehow in trouble when it became obvious to me he had an easy win...
Mar-06-09  ZUGZWANG67: A draw by perpetual?
Mar-06-09  ZUGZWANG67: Likely...
Mar-06-09  samikd: Poor Magnus ! But then, this is chess !
Mar-06-09  Chicago Chess Man: this is probably what playing too much blitz does to you...
Mar-06-09  ZUGZWANG67: Chess is probably the only sport/game where a draw can be enjoyed.
Mar-06-09  Kaspykov: <Chicago Chess Man: this is probably what playing too much blitz does to you...>

100% agree !!!!!

Mar-06-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Eat that frog, Magnus.
Mar-06-09  e4ia: Drawn! Kf1 vs kf3 was a totally a won game; Magnus has screwed up a lot of winning or drawing endgames, esp R + pawn...and he had time to find 47 Kf1!! end of game! Kudos to Radj and his Nb4!

Mar-06-09  e4ia:

meant Radj Nb5!

Mar-06-09  kellmano: <ZUGZWANG67: Chess is probably the only sport/game where a draw can be enjoyed.>

I'd like to provide counter-examples, but it's too easy.

Go on then: test cricket, football, rugby. To name but a few.

Mar-06-09  benjinathan: <ZUGZWANG67> I give you this:<On New Year's Eve 1975, the Red Army was scheduled to play the Montreal Canadiens. The Red Army was the most dominant team in the Soviet League and the Canadiens were usually the best team in the NHL the Canadiens went on to win the NHL later that year. The game was billed in North America as the de facto world professional championships. The game resulted in a 3-3 tie in a contest that is widely regarded as one of the greatest games ever to have taken place.>
Mar-06-09  rbond: By the way, the Canadiens outplayed the Red Army for most of the game, but some shakey goaltending at the end led to the tie. Sound familiar?
Mar-06-09  alterego: Marmot PFL: <alterego> i had seen that line beginning with Anand's Qa5, and expected Grischuk would play Qxc6 at the end instead of Rf1 (sorry i dont have move numbers.) Rf1 was good though as long as he played Bxf5 instead of allowing f4 when Anand's pawns were advancing and his bishops got into things fast (Bg4). At that point taking the draw was only sensible.

Thank you again for peoviding this line. I played it through. This should have been 26.Qxc6. And 29. Bxf5 which was not played, but R instead. But that would have been probably the winning line for Grischuk. In any case it ain't over... until it's over.

Mar-06-09  Ulhumbrus: <jon01: However, I still haven't understood why Kf1 is so much better than Kf3.> Both Kf1 and Kf3 approach the Black passed d pawn. The difference is that after ..Nc3, with a White Rook on b4, Ke3 allows the N to fork the K and R by ...Nd5+ whereas a Kon e1 can approach the pawn by Ke1 without allowing this fork.
Mar-06-09  ZUGZWANG67: <benjinathan; kellmano>

lol i did not think that such a comment would lead to such an 'emotionnal debate'!

I don' t know much about football (in my country, one calls it 'soccer') nor cricket. Would it be possible to use strategy (or tactic) in a way to reach an 'enjoyable' draw in those sports? And if so, does the fact that it would be 'enjoyable' depends on the game itself, or rather the way a draw could be achieved ? As here, in the game Radlabov/Carlsen, the draw was enjoyable because some moves were played specifically to avoid a loss, instead of the enjoyment being based on some more general factors.

And for hockey, I live 75 kilometers from Montreal and saw the 31Th of december 1975 game. Great game! But nowadays, there' s no draws allowed anymore. In NHL, every games must be decided in overtime and, if not enough, shootouts, to avoid a draw.

Mar-06-09  zanshin: <Ulhumbrus: Ke3 allows the N to fork the K and R by ...Nd5+ whereas a Kon e1 can approach the pawn by Ke1 without allowing this fork.>

Good explanation. I had Rybka analyze just 47.Kf1 and 47.Kf3:


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[+5.86] d=23 47.Kf1 (0:33.51) 128647kN
[+0.00] d=23 47.Kf3 Nb5 48.Rb4 (0:34.57) 134614kN

Mar-06-09  notyetagm: MONOKROUSSOS: http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/fil...

<47.Kf3?? Wow! Carlsen stumbles on the very last hurdle. If he were short of time it would be understandable, but with almost an hour on his clock it's much worse. Sure, some of the lines can be tricky, but Carlsen basically fell asleep. [47.Ra7+ Kh8 48.Ra8+ Kh7 49.Kf1! (49.Kf3?? is still bad, for the same reason as in the game: 49...Nb5 50.Rb8 Nc3 51.Rxb3 <<<(51.Ke3 b2 52.Rxb2 Nd1+ is a resource Black would not have if White's king were on e1.)>>> 51...d2 52.Rb7+ Kh8 53.Rd7 d1Q+ 54.Rxd1 Nxd1= ) 49...Nb5 50.Rb8 Nc3 51.Ke1 is the difference.; 47.Kf1 also wins. 47...Nb5 48.Rb4 Nc3 49.Ke1 ]>


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This <KNIGHT FORK> variation is made possible *only* because the White king went to f3 and then e3. If the White king had correctly gone to f1 and then e1, no <KNIGHT FORK> exists as the Black c3-knight could not <CHECK> the White e1-king.

Incredible tragedy for Carlsen.

Mar-07-09  notyetagm: Game Collection: MAKE A THREAT: ++

Carlsen vs Radjabov, 2009

51 ... b3-b2! Black c3-knight can check White e3-king for <TEMPO>.

Just amazing. With the White king on e3, <KNIGHT FORK> and draw after 51 ... b3-b2!.


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But with the White king on e1, no <CHECK>, no <TEMPO>, no <THREAT>, and loss. 51 ... b3-b2? now just drops a pawn because the White e1-king cannot be <FORKED> by the Black c3-knight.


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Wow.

Mar-07-09  notyetagm: <zanshin: Good explanation. I had Rybka analyze just 47.Kf1 and 47.Kf3:

<<<[+5.86] d=23 47.Kf1>>> (0:33.51) 128647kN

<<<[+0.00] d=23 47.Kf3>>> Nb5 48.Rb4 (0:34.57) 134614kn>

What an *incredible* difference it makes, whether the White king is on e3 or e1. The difference between a well-deserved win and a disastrous draw!

Mar-07-09  notyetagm: <zanshin: <Ulhumbrus: Ke3 allows the N to fork the K and R by ...Nd5+ whereas a Kon e1 can approach the pawn by Ke1 without allowing this fork.>>

Exactly.

Because the Black c3-knight can <CHECK> the White e3-king but *not* the White e1-king.

Mar-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal:


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In an interview with Macauley Peterson (https://webcast.chessclub.com/blog/...) Carlsen says that he considered here <47.Kf2>, and noticed the trap 47...b2 48.Rb4 Ne4+! 49.Ke3 d2/Nc3; so he played 47.Kf3 in order to avoid it (calculating 47...b2 48.Rb4 Nc4 49.Kf2), only to realize immediately after Radjabov's 47...Nb5! that he has walked into another trap.

Mar-08-09  notyetagm: <Eyal: In an interview with Macauley Peterson (https://webcast.chessclub.com/blog/...) Carlsen says that he considered here <47.Kf2>, and noticed the trap 47...b2 48.Rb4 Ne4+! 49.Ke3 d2/Nc3; so he played 47.Kf3 in order to avoid it (calculating 47...b2 48.Rb4 Nc4 49.Kf2), only to realize immediately after Radjabov's 47...Nb5! that he has walked into another trap.>

It's funny how computers give White a +3 advantage yet the position is difficult for a human to win because of all the Black <KNIGHT FORK> and <PROMOTION> tricks.

Even a chess genius like Carlsen fell for one of the traps and only got 1/2-point.

Mar-09-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  JeffCaruso: This game is an inspiration. Even when the position looks hopeless and you're down to a single Knight and a couple of pawns, you may still be able to cause enough trouble to catch a super-GM napping!
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