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Kurt Paul Otto Joseph Richter vs Enrique (Heinrich) Reinhardt
Telephone match Berlin-Hamburg (1937), Apr-10
Indian Game: General (A45)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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sac: 34.Qxh5+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-22-09  tivrfoa: this was easiest day, because there're two options correct: 34. Ne3 or Qxh5+

correct me if I'm wrong.

Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I missed this one on the later move: I went for ♘h6+ which loses to the maddening ♔f8. White could mate but the rook is blocked by his own knight-R A T S!!
Apr-22-09  cheeseplayer: Wohooo!! 3/3

Good week so far..

got the exact three moves.. took me 5 minutes though because i was forcing myself to go in one pattern..

Apr-22-09  Arbiter58: I could see

34 Qxh5+ gxh5 (34.. Kg8, 35 Qh8#)
35 Rxh5+ Kg8
36 Nf2 with the threat of Rg4+ and Rh8#
36 .. D1Q+ (what else?)
37 Nxd1 and mate seems unavoidable.

Apr-22-09  JG27Pyth: <<JG27Pyth> After <34. Ne3 Qxe5 35.Re4 Qc5 36.Qf4 Qxe3>, White wins with 37. Rexe3! d1=Q+ 38. Rf1 with a winning double attack (threatening the new Queen and mate-in-two).>

Ah, right, that's the whole point of Qf4 isn't it? ... that f6 pawn is a nightmare for Black.

Well so, 36...Qxe3 doesn't work. 36...g5 is dreadful. I think Black can prolong things with 36...Qf8 but he's quite lost.

Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <JG27Pyth>, <Patzer2> After 34. Ne3 Qxe5 35. Rfg4+ and mate follows.
Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Reinhardt is most likely this player: Enrique (Heinrich) Reinhardt
Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Earlier in the match I liked 30c3 as another good alternative for black, because it creates a passed pawn supported by a rook.


click for larger view

Now, white cannot play 31 Rf5 because of 31Nf4.


click for larger view

Now, white is forced to play 32 Rxf4 to avoid gxf5. Then 32c2 and the pawn promotion is unavoidable. White has to give up his rook for the pawn and black is now up the exchange.

If instead 31 bxc3 then 31...dxc3 and white has the same problem to deal with.


click for larger view

Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: Nuts -- I pretty much saw the whole thing rather quickly (after all, black's threats require white to make forcing moves).

However, I saw it a little *too* quickly and figured on 36.Nf2, not noticing the subtle requirement for 36.Ne3 instead.

Perhaps I would have noticed it by the time I got to move 36, but I didn't see it at move 34. :-|

Apr-22-09  Milesdei: Partial credit today. I failed to see that Nf2 loses to Qxf2, KxQ, d1=Q.
Apr-22-09  Kasputin: Black's king is in bad shape, and with a white pawn at f6, the question comes up: is there a way to get the black king over to f8 and land one of the rooks on h8? If so, then game over. At the same time, black has a pawn that is about to land on a queening square and this could be very bad news for white.

34. Qxh5+ gxh5
35. Rxh5+ Kg8

That was all easy. But now I got stuck - thinking on one hand that forced checks were in order (e.g., 36. Nh6+) but not seeing exactly where I should go with this until...

36. Ne3

Of course, this is the move. If 36 ...Qxe3 then the f-file rook slides over to g4 and the h-file rook will mate on h8 (black can throw the queen away on g5 but that just delays things for a move - same thing with ...Qxe5).

Anything else, like 36 ...d1=Q is answered by 37. Nxd1 and then the rook mate sequence takes place once again.

The e3 knight simultaneously vacates the g-file and protects against the black queen and the d-pawn. Very nice combination and (to my less experienced eyes anyway) quite an unusual one because the knight needs to retreat instead of directly participate.

Apr-22-09  JG27Pyth: Fusili<<JG27Pyth>, <Patzer2> After 34. Ne3 Qxe5 35. Rfg4+ and mate follows.>

Rfg4+ ? I don't think you meant that (it's neither a legal move, nor check), and I can't figure out what you meant.

Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  doubledrooks: After looking at 34. Qxh5 gh 35. Rxh5+ Kg8 36. Nh6+ for awhile and not seeing anything, I realized that the knight should head in the other direction with 36. Ne3 or 36. Nf2, simultaneously allowing the Rf4 to go to g4 and covering the d2 pawn's promotion square on d1. But is there a difference in the two knight moves? Yes, because on f2 the knight can be taken by the black queen with check, allowing the pawn on d2 to queen. So, I went with 36. Ne3 and black cannot avoid mate with Rg4+ and Rh8.
Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Fusili> I'm as confused as <JG27Pyth> After 34. Ne3 Qxe5 35. Rfg4 (it's not with check), Black has 35...Re8! when the tables turn and White is busted.
Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  playground player: In this position, whatever White comes up with had better be good. What made the puzzle hard for me was the illusion that the Knight must be part of a mating attack--but the trick is that the Knight is actually in the way, and must move elsewhere. And as it turns out, Ne3 is the best place for it to go. Once it's out of the way, the two White Rooks can do their thing.
Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: One of the harder wednesdays for a while. 34 Ne3 Qxe5 35 Re4 (else Qxh5+ gh Rxh5+ Kg8 Rg4+ and mate) looks good enough to win but is not the best move order as the game shows.
Apr-22-09  Sicilian Dragon: Yah, i got this one too :-D
Apr-22-09  solskytz: Saw it, quickly, and it feels good :-)

Wasn't too patient to check whether black can really do nothing after the third move Ne3 - but of course in a game I would :-) I said 'for the heck of it - let's see the solution' - and was in the right.

This usually doesn't work on Fridays and later - but I don't take tactical exercises too seriously, ever ever.

Apr-22-09  JG27Pyth: patzer2 <<Fusili> I'm as confused as <JG27Pyth>> No. No you're not ;) ... I wonder why I thought rfg4 wasn't legal?... I double checked and was sure the error was on his end.. oh well...
Apr-22-09  Zorts: 36.Ne3 perfect finish, very nice.
Apr-22-09  Stormbringer: Missed it. I looked at all of the moves played, including the Queen sac.

I couldn't make that work, so what I did was to then look at all of the Knight moves, wondering if this was one of the puzzles where defense prevails.

But what I didn't do was to look at moving the knight back for defense _after_ saccing the Queen.

Apr-22-09  zooter: <JG27Pyth: patzer2 <<Fusili> I'm as confused as <JG27Pyth>> No. No you're not ;) ... I wonder why I thought rfg4 wasn't legal?... I double checked and was sure the error was on his end.. oh well...>

I think he means after the text, i.e 34.Qxh5+ gxh5 35.Rxh5+ Kg8 36.Ne3 Qxe5 and not after 34.Ne3... :)

Apr-22-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheBish: Richter vs Reinhardt, 1936

White to play (34?) "Medium/Easy"

I only had one candidate move, since nothing else makes sense. It was just a matter of finding the follow-up!

34. Qxh5+! gxh5 35. Rxh5+ Kg8 36. Ne3! (but not 36. Nf2? Qxf2+ 37. Kxf2 d1=Q, guarding the g4 square) and Black can choose between resignation, spite checks before Rg4+ and a quick mate, or 36...Qxe3 37. Rg4+ Qg5 and now capture by either rook leads to mate in two.

Apr-24-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <<zooter>: I think he means after the text, i.e 34.Qxh5+ gxh5 35.Rxh5+ Kg8 36.Ne3 Qxe5 and not after 34.Ne3... :)>

Yes, sorry everyone, <zooter> is right. I was looking at Ne3 after Qxh5+ etc. I didn't realize you were discussing 34.Ne3 instead of 34.Qxh5+.

Dec-12-09  Alan McGowan: The game was played in a telephone match Berlin v Hamburg, on April 10, 1937. Board 2. White was Kurt Richter (Berlin).
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