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Magnus Carlsen vs Michael Adams
London Chess Classic (2009), London ENG, rd 6, Dec-14
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Reshevsky Variation (E46)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 14 OF 14 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-14-09  karnak64: Would something like Rd8 draw here? Since the B controls the queening square and cannot be chases off, getting the R behind the f-pawn seems to me the end of things.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: <plang> you really think this game is now drawn? The a pawns aren't going anywhere. The white rook can keep the black king at bay. It would tkae a blunder to lose -- walking into a skewer or fork.
Dec-14-09  Ulhumbrus: One famous game where a player who was a pawn ahead won with Rooks and bishops of opposite colours is Kasparov vs Korchnoi, 1983
Dec-14-09  Bent Bexley: Game over. .5
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: If white forgets to take the black rook, he could lose.
Dec-14-09  Ulhumbrus: Adams has just exchanged Rooks. This looks like s draw. Adams will feel probably as sick as a parrot after he learns that Black could have won by following 25...dxe3 with 25...Re5 in reply to 26 Be2.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Well this looks dead drawn to me. The white king parks itself on f1 and the black bishop shuttles between b5 and e8. And what it black going to do about it?
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Thanks to everybody for stopping by today and participating in our live broadcast of the 2009 London Classic.

Please note that tomorrow the final round starts TWO HOURS EARLIER -- that means 7:00am USA/Eastern for you Americans. Nevertheless, we hope to see you back for more!

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: I appreciated their 'engagement' for the last 25 moves.
Dec-14-09  zarg: Wild stuff from Carlsen, I am almost sad Adams didn't punish him with a loss.
Dec-14-09  zanshin: Adams can at least take heart in knowing he drew with Black against Carlsen - but I'm sure it won't quite make up for missing <25...dxe3!>.
Dec-14-09  Ulhumbrus: Instead of 25..Bc5, after 25dxe3! 26 Be2 Adams could have won by 26Re5!! transferring this Rook to the King side.

The lesson which this suggests is that in order to succeed, an attacker has to make use of all ways to attack the opposing King, not just some of them.

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  swordfish: Even if he missed a win against Carlsen today, Adams's performance has been quite solid. He also drew with Black against Kramnik. If not for the Danailovian "Sofia rules" rubbish, his score would look better.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Btw, instead of Qf3 on moves 25/27, <Qg4> is better for White; dxe3 should probably still be winning, but Black has to work harder. The Rybka main line goes: 25.Qg4 dxe3 26.Be2 Bg3 [here the 26...Re5 idea isn't so strong, because after 27.h4, Rf5 doesn't come with an attack on the queen] 27.Qf3 Bf2+ 28.Kh1 Qc8 29.Kh2 Qf5 30.Qxf5 gxf5 31.Bf3 Bh4+ 32.Kh1 e2 33.Bxe2 Rexe2 34.Bf4 Rxb2 etc.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <swordfish: Even if he missed a win against Carlsen today, Adams's performance has been quite solid. He also drew with Black against Kramnik. If not for the Danailovian "Sofia rules" rubbish, his score would look better.>

I don't understand how the Sofia rule has hurt Adams' score. Could you explain?

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: He probably means the 3-1-0 scoring system (I've noticed quite a few people tend to cofuse it with the "Sofia Rule" concerning draw offers) - without it, McShane wouldn't be leading over Adams, and Carlsen and Kramnik not by so much.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  YouRang: <Eyal> Ah, you're probably right.

For the benefit of those who have this confusion: The "Sofia rule" has nothing to do with the 3-1-0 scoring system. Rather, it is the rule saying that games cannot be 'drawn by agreement' without consent from the chief arbiter. The CA will allow the draw only if he/she deems the position to be clearly drawn.

The 3-1-0 scoring rule, so I've heard, is referred to as the "Bilboa rule".

Personally, I'm not thrilled with the 3-1-0 system (an unnecessary gimmick IMO). However, I like the Sofia rule.

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: <Eyal: Btw, instead of Qf3 on moves 25/27, <Qg4> is better for White; dxe3 should probably still be winning, but Black has to work harder. The Rybka main line goes: 25.Qg4 dxe3 26.Be2 Bg3 [here the 26...Re5 idea isn't so strong, because after 27.h4, Rf5 doesn't come with an attack on the queen] 27.Qf3 Bf2+ 28.Kh1 Qc8 29.Kh2 Qf5 30.Qxf5 gxf5 31.Bf3 Bh4+ 32.Kh1 e2 33.Bxe2 Rexe2 34.Bf4 Rxb2 etc.>Adding to this analysis would be the line 26...Bc5! 27.Kh1 Re5 28.b4 Bd6 .
Dec-14-09  JaneEyre: Carlsen, in the post-game analysis session, opined that the plan starting with 15.f4 was premature. He said he should have prepared for it with moves like Qc2, Bd2 and Rd1.

When shown the line beginning 25...dxe3, both players confessed that they hadn't really appreciated its strength.

Carlsen admitted to overlooking the faster drawing line with 37.Rf1.

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  acirce: I guess it's impossible to beat Carlsen.
Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: It would be very difficult. Players like carlsen, Kramnik, and Kasparov at their best force the others to innovate and to raise their standard of play. Difficult, but not impossible. A competitive disadvantage is that more players will study his games looking for weaknesses and preparing new ideas than they would for a lower rated GM.
Dec-14-09  ajile: <JaneEyre: Carlsen, in the post-game analysis session, opined that the plan starting with 15.f4 was premature. He said he should have prepared for it with moves like Qc2, Bd2 and Rd1.>

Yes this is true. White didn't have the development to support a real attack. He could have waited a few moves still disguising his intentions. Black had no real counterplay anyways at that time.

Dec-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: After 11...c5 white appears to have lost his opening advantage:


click for larger view

Rybka 3:

<[+0.03] d=22 12.Nf4> Nc7 13.Re1 b6 14.b3 cxd4 15.exd4 Bd6 16.Rxe8+ Qxe8 17.Bd2 h6 18.Qc2 Ne6 19.Nxe6 Bxe6 20.Qd3 Rc8 21.Re1 Qd7 22.Qa6 Bf5

[+0.00] d=22 12.dxc5 Nxc5 13.Nf4 a5 14.Ncxd5 Nxd5 15.Nxd5 Be6 16.e4 Bxd5 17.exd5 Qb6 18.Kh1 Nb3 19.Rb1 Qb5 20.f4 Rac8 21.d6 Rxc1 22.Rxc1 Nxc1 23.Qxc1 Bxd6 24.Rd1 Bc5 25.Bf3 g6 26.Kg2 Re2+ 27.Bxe2

Dec-15-09  The Rocket: carlsen tries to emulate his coach and almost goes up in flames, but is saved by the clock when adams dont have enough time before move 40 and simplifies.
Dec-15-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <The reason Michael Adams didn't play [25...dxe3!!] was because he thought White could play 26 Bd3, missing the fact that Black could then follow up with 26...Bc5! which should sure the win for Black after 27 Bxc2 e2+ 28 Kg2 exf1Q+ 29 Qxf1 Qc6+!, etc. [30.Qf3 Re2+]> (http://www.londonchessclassic.com/r...)

According to the same report, Adams admitted he had not seen the plan of Kf1e1 on moves 30-31 for White, so he probably thought he was winning after 29...dxe3.

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