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Pia Cramling vs Stefan E S Kindermann
Hamburg SKA (1991), Hamburg GER, rd 11, Jul-??
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Classical Variation (D86)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: Saturday (Very Difficult)

P Cramling vs S Kindermann, 1991 (15.?)

White to play and win.

Material: Even. The Black Kg8 has 1 legal move, f8. The White Rh1 has an open file, direct to Kg8, suggesting a heavy piece battery. The Black Pg6 prevents Qd1-h5, but the P-chain protecting Kg8 is under fire from Bb3 and Nf4, suggesting a sacrifice to open Kg8 and to take advantage of the superior White mobility. Note: the White Qd1 can reload Bb3; and Bc1-a3 might be useful in a K-side attack. The White Ke1 is secured from check.

Candidates (15.): Nxg6, Nxe6

15.Nxe6 (threatening 16.Nxd8, winning the exchange)

(1) Black can decline the sacrifice:

15Re8 16.Ng5 (threatening 17.Bxf7+)

The threats on Pf7 give White time to stabilize the center and keep the P.

(2) Black can accept the sacrifice:

15fxe6 16.Qg4 (threatening 17.Bxe6+, forking Kg8 and Qd7)

16Re8 [better than Bc8, undeveloping a piece]

17.Qxg6

(threatening to overburden with 18.Rh7, 18.Bh6, or 18.Qh7+)

(1) 17Nd8 18.Rh7 (threatening 19.Rxg7+ Qxg7 20.Qxe8+)

18Kf8 19.Bh6 Re7 20.Bxg7 Rxg7 21.Rh8+ Ke7 [Rg8 22.Rxg8#]

22.Qxg7+ 23.Qxd7+ 24.Rxa8 leaves White with 2R for N.

(2) 17Qf7 18.Rh8+ Kxh8 19.Qxf7 leaves White with Q+2P for R+N.

(3) 17Bc8 18.Rh7 (threatening 19.Rxg7+ Qxg7 20.Qxe8+)

18Re7 19.Bh6

The Bg7 can no longer be defended, so Black loses material.

I considered Black counter-attacking at d4, but dismissed it as futile.

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: After 15...Ne5 16.Nxd8 Nd3+ 17 Kd2...

<DomDaniel> < Simply 17...Rxd8 is better. Black has now sacrificed the exchange - but threatens to win it back with ...Nxf2, and has great compensation. The White King interferes with the Bc1 and is vulnerable to blows like ...c5, and the threat to f7 is largely neutralized.>

In this line here is the position assuming white follows 17...Rxd8 with 18 Qf3. Now comes 18...c5.


click for larger view

Black threatens both 19..cxd4 or 19...c4. Of course, white cannot play 19 cxd5?? because of 19...Ne5+, winning the queen.

Yes, black is down material, but what a position.

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  johnlspouge: < <Once> wrote: Well, I had the same basic idea, but I sacked the knight for the other pawn... >

Most tactical strokes have a "conjugate", i.e., the symmetry of the pieces' movements often creates two possible strokes. Usually, one of the two conjugates is clearly superior, so it pays to recognize the phenomenon explicitly, to look for conjugates and to compare them explicitly. Here, acceptance of either 15.Nxe6 fxe6 or 15.Nxg6 fxg6 leads to the same position, but the sacrifice 15.Nxe6 is more forcing than 15.Nxg6, essentially brooking no refusal.

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: After 15.Nxe6 Ne5 16.Nxd8 Nd3+ 17.Qxd3 Bxd3 18.Nxf7 Kf8 19.Ba3+, what if 19...Ke8 20.0-0-0 Be2 instead?

I'm stuck.


click for larger view

Feb-06-10  Quentinc: Given the complications and uncertainty of 15...Ne5 16.Nxd8, what about the "cowardly" (i.e., what I probably would have played OTB) 16.Nf4 instead?

If 16...g5 17.Qh5, and White looks at least a little better in the lines I've played through.

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <JimjfromProvidence> <I'm stuck>

Analysis by Fritz 10 @ 19 depth, 2-cpu:

1. (4.95): 21.Ne5 Bxe5 22.dxe5 Qg7 23.Rd2 Bg4 24.f4 b5 25.Rh4 Bc8 26.Bd5 g5 27.Rh5 gxf4 28.Bxa8 Kf7 29.Rd8 Be6 30.Bd5 Kg6

2. (4.79): 21.Rd2 Bh5 22.f3 Qc6 23.Kb2 Rd8 24.Nxd8 Kxd8 25.e5 Kc8 26.Rdd1 a5 27.g4 Qxf3 28.gxh5 gxh5 29.Be6+

3. (1.57): 21.Rde1 Bc4 22.Ne5 Bxe5 23.dxe5 Qc6 24.Rh8+ Kd7 25.Rd1+ Ke6 26.Rh7 Re8 27.Bc2 Kxe5 28.Rdd7 Bg8 29.Rxc7

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Quentinc> After 16...Ne5 16. Nf4?! Qc6 17. Qc2 White no longer has a clear forced win (i.e. 16. Nxd8 wins with strong follow-up).
Feb-06-10  LoveThatJoker: <Jimfromprovidence: After 15...Ne5 16.Nxd8 Nd3+ 17 Kd2...

<DomDaniel> < Simply 17...Rxd8 is better. Black has now sacrificed the exchange - but threatens to win it back with ...Nxf2, and has great compensation. The White King interferes with the Bc1 and is vulnerable to blows like ...c5, and the threat to f7 is largely neutralized.>

In this line here is the position assuming white follows 17...Rxd8 with 18 Qf3. Now comes 18...c5.

Black threatens both 19..cxd4 or 19...c4. Of course, white cannot play 19 cxd5?? because of 19...Ne5+, winning the queen.

Yes, black is down material, but what a position.>

Interesting line here that DomDaniel presented based on Jimfromprovidence's original suggestion of 15. Nxe6 Ne5.

I'm actually in agreement that after 15. Nxe6 Ne5 16. Nxd8 Nd3+ 17. Kd2 Rxd8 18. Qf3 is a decent choice.

If now 18...c5 19. d5 begins consolidating the material advantage.

LTJ

Feb-06-10  cyclon: <Jimfromprovidence: In this line here is the position assuming white follows 17...Rxd8 with 18 Qf3. Now comes 18...c5.> It's really true that White is encountering problems here in this variation, no doubt. However, after 18. -c5, I'd play 19.Bd5 (if -cxd4 20.cxd4 Bxd4 21.Rb1 - but there's probably something else also).
Feb-06-10  cyclon: <LoveThatJoker: If now 18...c5 19. d5 begins consolidating the material advantage.> Perhaps 19.d5 is Whites best move here, I don't know for sure. I find this position (after 18. -c5) very difficult to estimate in a satisfying manner.
Feb-06-10  LoveThatJoker: <cyclon: <Jimfromprovidence: In this line here is the position assuming white follows 17...Rxd8 with 18 Qf3. Now comes 18...c5.> It's really true that White is encountering problems here in this variation, no doubt. However, after 18. -c5, I'd play 19.Bd5 (if -cxd4 20.cxd4 Bxd4 21.Rb1 - but there's probably something else also).> Hey cyclon. White is not encountering any problems at all in this line. Of course, White has a slightly awkwardly placed K and an undeveloped Q-side. However, the dark-squared Bishop does yet have an outlet at a3 (if needed) and White is up 3 in the force count.

The onus now is on Black to prove that he has compensation for being down 3 in the force count and after 18...c5 19. d5, I don't think he does.

I would gladly take White in such a position.

LTJ

Feb-06-10  cyclon: cyclon: <LoveThatJoker:> To demonstrating what I mean in the sense that things may not (just maybe not) be so clear YET (even at the same time admitting the probable plausibility -in the good sense- of 19.d5), is the idea for Black to play 19. -Qb5, intending -Qa5 with a square c3 in sight. For example; (19. -Qb5 ) 20.d6 Ne5/20.Kc2? c4/20.c4 Qb4+ 21.Kxd3 Qc3+ 22.Ke2 Qxa1 23.Bg5 Qb2+, White still has `proving`. Maybe you have some idea? Anyway, thank you from your post!
Feb-06-10  SamAtoms1980: I went in with the wrong piece with 15 Bxe6 fxe6 16 Nxg6, which gets completely smoked by 16 ... Nxd4.
Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  gofer: I could write for ages on this one... ...but the following is enough...

15 Nxe6 fxe6
16 Qg4 Bc8 (better than Re8 and Qe8/Qf7/Kf7 all lose quickly) 17 Bg5 ...

now this is debatable, Ba3 is also good, but I prefer Bg5

17 ... Ne7 (trying to stop Qxg6)
18 Rh3 Kf7 (trying to get to saftey)
19 Rf3+ Ke8
20 Qf4 winning as black must give up material...

There are probably thousands of variations and this is just one, but its one I kind of like...

Time to check...

Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: After 15.Nxe6 Ne5 16.Nxd8 Nd3+ 17.Qxd3 Bxd3 18.Nxf7 Kf8 19.Ba3+, what if 19...Ke8 20.0-0-0 Be2 instead?

<Patzer2> <*Analysis by Fritz 10 @ 19 depth, 2-cpu:

1. (4.95): 21.Ne5 Bxe5 22.dxe5 Qg7 23.Rd2 Bg4 24.f4 b5 25.Rh4 Bc8 26.Bd5 g5 27.Rh5 gxf4 28.Bxa8 Kf7 29.Rd8 Be6 30.Bd5 Kg6>

Thanks for the assist. Your lines show that the queenside castling on move 20 for white is quite decisive.

Feb-06-10  remolino: I would go for 15.Nxg6

A. 15.Nxg6 fxg6, 16. Qg4 Nxd4, (16...Re8, 17. Qxg6) 17. cxd4

B. 15. Nxg6 Nxd4, 16. Qh5

Time to check.

Feb-06-10  remolino: OK, 15. Nxe6 seems more decisive. will check whether Nxg6 works too on the kiblitzers posts.
Feb-06-10  Skylark: <David2009> - check my analysis above - I came to the same conclusion of choosing Nh5, but rather than a3 the queen should take straight away on h5 and follow up with Bh6. It took a while for the engine to turn the position around to a slight plus for white though (rybka 2.2n2) rather than the game continuation which is outright winning.
Feb-06-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: I at least considered the first move
Feb-06-10  LoveThatJoker: <cyclon: <LoveThatJoker:> To demonstrating what I mean in the sense that things may not (just maybe not) be so clear YET (even at the same time admitting the probable plausibility -in the good sense- of 19.d5), is the idea for Black to play 19. -Qb5, intending -Qa5 with a square c3 in sight. For example; (19. -Qb5 ) 20.d6 Ne5/20.Kc2? c4/20.c4 Qb4+ 21.Kxd3 Qc3+ 22.Ke2 Qxa1 23.Bg5 Qb2+, White still has `proving`. Maybe you have some idea? Anyway, thank you from your post!>

Hey cyclon. Thanks for your note, man.

Trust me! I spent a lot of time trying to find a direct refutation to 19...Qb5 and came up with a lot of lines.

As you know, I do these blindfold so as to improve my OTB tactical vision. That's why I needed a little time in replying to you.

Here are some that still maintain a decent advantage for White

a) 20. Rb1 c4 21. Bc2 Qa5 22. Bb2 Qxa2 23.

b) 20. Rb1 Bxc3+ 21. Kxc3 Qb4+ 22. Kc2 c4 and now Fritz 12 found 23. Qh3! with a huge advantage to White.

That being said after 19...Qb4 20. Rb1, Fritz 12 says that Black has an immediate draw by 20...Ne5 21. Qe3 Ng4 22. Qf3 as White must protect against the mate threat on e2.

Also, I had looked at the line that Fritz 12 saw immediately which is 20. c4 Qb4 21. Kxd3 Qc3+ (21...Bxa1? 22. Bd2) 22. Ke2 Qxa1 but didn't like it because I thought that White had failed to trade material down (so as to have a big advantage with an active K and passed pawn.)

However, Fritz 12 found this continuation,
23. Qd3 Bb2 24. Qd2 Bxc1 25. Qxc1 Qe5 26. Qe3 Re8 27. f3 f5 28. Qh6 Kf7 29. Qg5 Kg7 30. Rh6 fxe4 31. Qxg6+ 1.63/21

Admittedly, 17...Rxd8 provides a really good defensive try for Black, however, I am glad that I found all these lines blindfold and do not instantly need to run to Fritz or to play these moves out by hand so as to formulate a competent opinion.

This isn't necessarily directed at you Cyclon, as I do not know how you approach the analysis of positions. However, it is directed at those who like to hide their small capacity for hard work behind 1's and 0's.

:D

LTJ

Feb-07-10  cyclon: Okay, it's morning here and I saw your analysis, which more or less confirm my `presentiment` concerning the `status` of the position after 19. -Qb5. There seems to be no easy, clear-cut, quick win for White -but (maybe/likely) gradual by very accurate play. So, you (also) had to resort into "Fritzie" (smiles). Anyway, I appreciate your blind-fold abilities. It's also very good exercising. I have recently started to use the board + pieces with these more difficult puzzles. It's a kind of 'fun` and less tiring than blindfold - I'm aging, slowly but surely. No, I do not use pc-programs or anything like that in solving these puzzles. I don't see any point in that! Puzzles are for the 'MIND' - not for the machines - in this sense (f.e. Chessgames.com). But, at the same time - particularly regarding very complex, obscure positions- I view as a GOOD thing to have -to view afterwards, later on the site, after puzzle has been solved- a 'confirmament', or kind of 'direction-lines' by someone with F/R -programs on the web-site. Maybe I should buy one - so far I've managed decently without.
Feb-07-10  LoveThatJoker: < cyclon: Okay, it's morning here and I saw your analysis, which more or less confirm my `presentiment` concerning the `status` of the position after 19. -Qb5. There seems to be no easy, clear-cut, quick win for White -but (maybe/likely) gradual by very accurate play. So, you (also) had to resort into "Fritzie" (smiles). Anyway, I appreciate your blind-fold abilities. It's also very good exercising. I have recently started to use the board + pieces with these more difficult puzzles. It's a kind of 'fun` and less tiring than blindfold - I'm aging, slowly but surely. No, I do not use pc-programs or anything like that in solving these puzzles. I don't see any point in that! Puzzles are for the 'MIND' - not for the machines - in this sense (f.e. Chessgames.com). But, at the same time - particularly regarding very complex, obscure positions- I view as a GOOD thing to have -to view afterwards, later on the site, after puzzle has been solved- a 'confirmament', or kind of 'direction-lines' by someone with F/R -programs on the web-site. Maybe I should buy one - so far I've managed decently without.>

Yeah, man. I dislike it when people rely solely on the computer to analyze a position. I mean, if I don't want to do the work, I will rely on the computer for sure. But it is better to start with one's own abilities and then use it as a tool to improving the ideas that one started with.

That's why I have no problems using Fritz. Because I know that I'm going to do my best first on my own abilities and then use it as a guide to better chess.

I definitely recommend that you get one, as it will help you improve on your chess.

And even though you think that you have managed to do decently without one, remember that the times have changed and even Super Grandmasters rely on computers to assist them in their analysis.

In fact, that's why many Grandmasters think that Karpov's chess has deteriorated...because he has failed to adapt to employing the tools to better chess.

LTJ

Feb-07-10  cyclon: Ok, I agree. It's most likely that you're right. Note, I never said I don't respect computers ( + programs ) - on the contrary! Human abilities amazes me. I consider computer + internet to be among the MOST important inventions by human-kind. I could live without any other machine these days (personally), but NOT without the COMPUTER.
Feb-07-10  LoveThatJoker: Cool, cyclon. I hope you have a great Sunday.

And thanks for telling me of 19...Qb5. Good analysis on your part.

LTJ

PS. As a treat for you I'm including this as I left Fritz 12 running for 6.5 hours on this line

a) 20. Rb1 c4 21. Bc2 Qa5 22. Bb2 Qxa2

Analysis by Fritz 12:

1. (1.17): 23.Qg4 Bf6 24.f3 Kf8 25.Qg3 Be5 26.Qh4 Re8 27.Qh6+ Kg8 28.Ke2 Bg7 29.Qh4 Bb5 30.g4

2. (0.90): 23.Qe3 Bb5 24.f3 Re8 25.g3 Rc8 26.Qg5 Ba4 27.Bxa4 Qxa4 28.Qe7 Re8 29.Qa3 Qd7 30.Ra1 Qb5 31.Bc1

Apr-23-18  Saniyat24: Pia's forced entrance at the eleventh hour...!
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