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Arkadij Naiditsch vs Wesley So
Corus Group B (2010), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 1, Jan-16
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. Flohr-Mikenas-Carls Variation (A18)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-16-10  mysql: Wesley survived this one.
Jan-16-10  Nina Myers: Regrettably, Naiditsch missed the winning move <30.Qxc7 >
Jan-16-10  zanshin: Who knows what would have happened if White had played <16.Qa4+>.
Jan-16-10  timhortons: why did wesley drop the d6 pawn?
Jan-16-10  blueofnoon: If you are talking about 64...d5, that's because he had to.

Moves like Bh2 or Be5 drops h4 pawn and gives white a passed h-pawn, while Bf2 loses bishop to Rf4+ and Kg8 allows Re8 mate.

Therefore, the only legal move that did not lose immediately was d5.

Jan-16-10  kakarot: hahah!move 40 over this game is really hilarious!naiditsch was trying for about 70 moves to win a drawish endgame!nice chess..
Jan-16-10  weisyschwarz: <timhortons: why did wesley drop the d6 pawn?>

Probably to free his king.

So what was Naiditsch thinking???

Jan-16-10  timhortons: thanks for the answer.
Jan-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: <mysql: Wesley survived this one.>

it's the other way around..."Naiditsch survived this one." :-}

Jan-17-10  e4e5: <timhortons: why did wesley drop the d6 pawn?> It's forced, no other move for black but to lose a pawn.
Jan-17-10  manakin: In this variation, what's the point in 1...e6 followed by 3...e5? Isn't that a mere waste of tempo?
Jan-17-10  manakin: Takes skill to finish this one...

Check out Kramnik's work at an almost exactly the same position in his game against Ponomariov from the last tal memorial.

On the other hand, it's hard to believe any of the players did not know this position, the other game being famous and still fresh in mind. And it is ALMOST the same position, which probably makes all the difference.

Jan-17-10  licuan: <manakin: In this variation, what's the, point in 1...e6 followed by 3...e5? Isn't that a mere waste of tempo?>

maybe he was trying to convert the opening into a Slav or what . . . .

Jan-17-10  TugasKamagong: As <manakin> points out, the similarity to Kramnik vs Ponomariov, 2009 is uncanny. Here is the final position of that game:


click for larger view

Note that Ponomariov is in zugzwang: His only King move, 81...Kg8, allows 82.Re8#. So he can move only his Bishop. If the B leaves the b8-h2 diagonal, the Black pawn is left undefended and White plays 82. Rxh4. That leaves Black with only two B moves, 81...Be1, which merely puts the B en prise (82. Rxe1) and 81...Bf2, which allows 82.Rf4+ winning the Bishop. Hence Black resigned at this point.

Now compare that with the position in the Naiditsch-So game after White's 64. Re4


click for larger view

The only difference is that Black has a pawn on d6!

Naiditsch must surely have studied the Kramnik-Ponomariov game, and realized his task here was to get rid of the Black d pawn, then come back to this same position.

Wesley is in zugzwang here, but he has one more move than Ponomariov had: he can play 64...d5. It loses the pawn, but then his King comes out of the cage and gallivants around the center. Naiditsch never managed to get back into the position Kramnik had, hence the draw.

Jan-19-10  desiobu: if black allows 4. e5 there's no good place for the knight. might as well spend that tempo on something less bad.
Jan-19-10  johnox07: After 16. Qa4+ Ke7 17.Rxf7+ Kxf7 18. Qd7+ Kg6 19. Qg4+ must only be drawish, but why will Naiditsch venture that line?
Jan-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: So otb with him is not good cherry eating.... ;)
Jan-26-10  timhortons: im expecting naiditsch to lead group B but im dissapointed,these young guns are just to much for him.
Jan-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Random snapshot of both: http://chessbase.de/2010/corus/9/Ds...
Jan-27-10  timhortons: <whiteshark>

its nice to see wesley wearing a suit:)

Jan-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: It is, but White's extra move is c2-c4, taking away c4 and b5 from the bishop. After four moves it's a Four Knights Game except for that pawn. White would probably be better off with his pawn back on c2.
Aug-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  iking: Aldyn Guseinov vs Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
Dubai Open 2000 King's Indian Defense: Orthodox Variation. Positional Defense (E94) 1-0

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 Nbd7 7. O-O e5 8. Qc2 c6 9. Rd1 Qc7 10. Rb1 a5 11. a3 a4 12. Nxa4 Nxe4 13. Qxe4 Rxa4 14. Qh4 Qd8 15. Qxd8 Rxd8 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Ng5 Rf8 18. Ne4 Nf6 19. Nd6 Be6 20. b3 Ra7 21. a4 b6 22. Be3 c5 23. Nb5 Rb7 24. a5 bxa5 25. Bxc5 Ra8 26. Bf3 e4 27. Nd6 exf3 28. Nxb7 Ne4 29. Rd3 Nxc5 30. Nxc5 Bf5 31. gxf3 Bxd3 32. Nxd3 Bd4 33. Ne1 Rb8 34. Nc2 Be5 35. h3 Rc8 36. Na3 Rd8 37. Nb5 Rd2 38. Re1 Bf6 39. Re8+ Kg7 40. Ra8 Rb2 41. c5 Rxb3 42. c6 Rxb5 43. c7 Rc5 44. c8=Q Rxc8 45. Rxc8 Be7 46. Ra8 Bb4 47. Ra6 h5 48. Kg2 Bd2 49. Kg3 Kh7 50. f4 f5 51. Ra7+ Kh6 52. Kf3 Bb4 53. Rd7 Bc3 54. Ke3 Bb2 55. Ra7 Bc1+ 56. Kf3 Bd2 57. Rd7 Bb4 58. Ke2 Bc5 59. Rd5 Bb4 60. Kd3 a4 61. Rd4 Bc5 62. Rxa4 Bxf2 63. Kc4 Bg3 64. Kd5 h4 65. Ke6 Kh5 66. Kf6 Bh2 67. Kf7 Bg3 68. Ra6 Bxf4 69. Rxg6 Be3 70. Kf6 f4 71. Rg5+ Kh6 72. Rg4 Kh5 73. Rg5+ Kh6 74. Rg8 Bd4+ 75. Kf5 Bf2 76. Kxf4 Bg3+ 77. Kf5 Kh7 78. Rg6 Bf2 79. Kg5 Be1 80. Re6 Bg3 81. Re7+ Kg8 82. Kg6 Kf8 83. Re4 1-0

Mamedyarov and ponomariov have the same predicaments in this position


click for larger view

nice trapping!

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