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Veselin Topalov vs Viswanathan Anand
Anand - Topalov World Championship Match (2010), Sofia BUL, rd 10, May-07
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Classical Variation (D86)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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May-07-10  parisattack: Another interesting game.

Times change - the Exchange Grunfeld used to be so dynamic in the 50s-60s (Gligoric's games as White are especially pleasing) - now it seems somewhat sterile. I guess that is what happens when main lines are analyzed to move 25-30!

Two game WCC match on tap now. That is some discouraging...but not as much as the prospect of the WCC being decided by a Blitz playoff.

May-07-10  SufferingBruin: <TrueBlue> I disagree entirely. You can find plenty of objective comments on this or any other board.

For example: it's an objective fact that Danailov does not breathe oxygen but sulfur. No one disputes that he is humanoid but there is plenty of disagreement as to whether he is, in fact, a carbon-based life form (I say no). While it is an open debate as to whether Topalov performed a ritual animal sacrifice with a cow or a goat, there is but no question that in order to secure Danailov's support, the blood of some mammal was needed.

So please don't mistake those of us who are cheering on Anand as having a man-crush on Anand. It's just that, in looking at the evidence objectively, what else were we to do?

May-07-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ron: <SufferingBruin> Funny post there, reminds me of the writing style of R.A. Lafferty, an under-rated writer of the fantastic.
May-07-10  LIFE Master AJ: <<May-07-10 <SufferingBruin: <TrueBlue>> I disagree entirely. You can find plenty of objective comments on this or any other board. For example: it's an objective fact that Danailov does not breathe oxygen but sulfur. No one disputes that he is humanoid but there is plenty of disagreement as to whether he is, in fact, a carbon-based life form (I say no). While it is an open debate as to whether Topalov performed a ritual animal sacrifice with a cow or a goat, there is but no question that in order to secure Danailov's support, the blood of some mammal was needed.

So please don't mistake those of us who are cheering on Anand as having a man-crush on Anand. It's just that, in looking at the evidence objectively, what else were we to do?>>

Funny post, I had trouble staying in my chair while reading it. HILARIOUS!!!

Who says that chess players have no sense of humor?

May-08-10  notyetagm: Topalov vs Anand, 2010

Wow, I am so glad Anand stopped playing Kramnik's "Oliver Twist" Slav variation.

Why "Oliver Twist"?

Anand: <Please, sir, can I have some draw?>

Topalov: <You want DRAW?!?!>

May-08-10  jhoro: I think the talk about winning chances on moves 41 & 44 is exaggerated. For example

41.Ke3 Bc5 seems to hold


click for larger view

as well as 44.Kf3 Bd6


click for larger view

must be optical illusion

May-08-10  Kazzak: Illusory winning chances. Both Topalov and later Anand depended upon the other making a "Bc6" type blunder - and neither did.

The move everyone's calling for from Topalov doesn't do much, as far as I can tell.

41. Ke4 Bc5 42. Bg4+ Ke7 43. Bc3 Ne8 44. Be6 Nd6+ 45. Kd3 Bf2 46. Bf6+ Ke8 47. Be5 Ke7 48. Ke2 Bc5 49. Bf6+ Kf8 50 Kf3 Ne8 51. Be5 Nd6 52. h4 b4 53. Ke2 Nf7 54. Bf6 Bd6 55. Kf3 Ke8 56. Bc8 Ne5+ 57. Ke3 Nd7 58. Bd4 Nc5 59. Bg4 Ke7 60. Be2 a5, etc., etc., etc.

May-08-10  Ulhumbrus: If Anand considered the move 24...Nc6 careless- as it invited Ba6- this suggests the question of which alternatives he had. Suppose Black tries 24..Qg3 pinning the Be3 and preparing ..Be5. On 24 Bc2 Be5 25 Bf4 Bxf4 25 Nxf4 Qc3 Black seems to have the better of it.
May-08-10  Kazzak: The game was headed for a draw when Topalov allowed Anand to take the rooks off, and after the queen-swap it was done. But it was an intricate position which required precise counterplay, and with ample room for a misplaced piece of the "Bc6" kind.
May-08-10  Ulhumbrus: Anand did not say that his 25th move was careless. He said that his 24th move was careless. So 24...Nc6 may have been careless but Anand chose 25...Nd4 over 25...Bxa6 on purpose. A reasonable guess is, to repeat what I said in an earlier kibitz, that Anand may have wanted to manage the time on his clock better, because of what had happened in the previous game. In the previous game he did get a won game but let it slip in time pressure. He may have wanted particularly to avoid doing this with Black in the present game. So even if he were to gain a draw with difficulty the justification for the choice was that he would avoid throwing the game away in time trouble.
May-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Anand did not say that his 25th move was careless. He said that his 24th move was careless.>

Analysis, however, shows that the careless move was, in fact, his 25th. If calculated accurately, 25...Bxa6! (instead of Nd4) should apparently lead to quick equality and save Black a lot of groveling after 26.Qxc6 Qa1+ (26...Qxe4?? 27.Nf6+) 27.Kh2 Be5+ 28.Bf4 (28.Nf4 Qc3) 28...Bxf4+ 29.Nxf4 Qe5 and if 30.g3 Qb2+ 31.Ng2 Bf1 White has nothing better than forcing a perpetual; or 27.Kf2 Qxa2+ 28.Kg3 Qa3! (28...Be5+? 29.Kh4!) 29.Qa8+ Qf8 30.Qxa7 Be5+ 31.Kh4 Bc4.

May-10-10  Ulhumbrus: <Analysis, however, shows that the careless move was, in fact, his 25th. If calculated accurately,> Anand considered probably that if he spent a long time trying to calculate the consequences of 25 ..Bxa6 until he was sure of the conclusion he might indeed get a quicker and easier draw but he might also throw the game away in time trouble. Anand probably calculated some lines which left some room for doubt and then decided to spend no more time trying to be sure. A wise decision, considering what had happened in the previous game.
May-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: If Anand rejected lines following 25...Bxa6 of the kind I mentioned, it might be related to what happened in game 9 but not necessarily to time trouble issues, but rather as Shipov suggested in his commentary during the game that he didn't trust himself completely with regard to tactics and was afraid to miscalculate sharp and forcing lines due to the fatigue. Or maybe he actually did miscalculate and thought it was bad for Black because he missed something. At any rate, the exact reasons why Anand chose Nd4 over Bxa6 are just a matter of speculation; as far as the position itself is concerned, I doubt if heading into such a tough endgame can be called a wise decision, even if it eventually ended in a draw.
May-10-10  Ulhumbrus: To speculate further Anand could have thought that he could post his N so well on d4 or d6 that it would give him equality in the ending at least, whereas in fact White's bishop pair was the equal at least of a N even if the N was placed well on d4 or on d6. One can assume that Anand had not calculated the consequences of both choices entirely, otherwise he would have chosen ..Bxa6. I would guess that when Anand decided that it would take him a long time to be sure of his calculations after ...Bxa6 whereas he felt confident of holding his own at least in the ending, he decided to budget the time on his clock and to spend no more of it on trying to calculate further the consequences of ...Bxa6. It was not that Anand did not trust himself, but that it would cost him too much time on the clock to be able to trust himself. In other words, he did not want to pay too high a price on the clock for trusting himself.
May-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: I have video annotated this game in two parts:

Part 1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koxu...

Part 2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpjh...

May-12-10  yalie: Shipov appears to think Topalov messed up the win with 44. Be6. He feels that 44.Kf3 Bd6 was winning. I dont understand why Anand cant still play Nd6 after 44. Kf3? If 45. Kg3 then Ne4. I dont think the game is winning after 44.Kf3 Nd6. Anyone care to comment? Eyal? Ulhumbrus? Notyetagm?
May-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <yalie> The point is that after 44.Kf3, 44...Nd6 can be met with 45.Bb4, but I still don't know if it's winning for White - in his video analysis of the game (http://www.crestbook.com/files/Sofi...), Shipov mentions the idea of 45...Be5 46.Be6 Kf8 47.h4 Ke7 48.Bg8 Kf8 49.Bxh7 Kg7 50.Bxg6 Kxg6 51.Kg4 followed by 52.h5, but Black can play 47...Kg7 instead. Also, he seems to believe Black is holding after 44...Bd6 45.Bc8 Nc7 46.Ke4 b4! 47.Bb7 a5 48.Bc6 Na6! 49.Kd4 Nc5 (and so does Giri on chessbase).

I've noticed that Anand, in one of his post-match interviews (http://beta.thehindu.com/sport/othe...), is speaking about this game as one in which he "was losing", but he doesn't give any lines, of course... so I don't know if it's based on accurate analysis or just a bad feeling he had about his position in general.

May-13-10  yalie: thanks <Eyal>. so Shipov himself changed his mind between real time and subsequent video. I have played through the lines several times (including Shipov's line above) & with engine play & I playing black against the engine, & there is no win for white. Possible engines do not understand the position, but it appears to me there is really no win at least after 44.Kf3. Topa may have missed a win earlier though.
May-13-10  Ulhumbrus: Comment from Anand in "The Hindu" : <...And in Game 10, when I was losing, I thought that, after the last three games, if I were to lose and fall behind, it would be very difficult (to bounce back)...> Anand does not say when he was losing. It is conceivable that at one point he thought mistakenly that he was losing.
May-13-10  Ulhumbrus: Comment from Anand in "The Hindu" : <...And in Game 10, when I was losing, I thought that, after the last three games, if I were to lose and fall behind, it would be very difficult (to bounce back)...> Anand does not say when he was losing. It is conceivable that at one point he thought mistakenly that he was losing. If as <Eyal> has quoted Shipov mentions the idea of 45...Be5 46 Be6 Kf8 47 h4 Ke7 48 Bg8 Kf8 49 Bxh7 Kg7 50 Bxg6 Kxg6 51 Kg4 followed by 52 h5, it must be while commenting live on the game so that it becomes easier to miss this or that resource, because in this position Black just plays 51...Ng7! and blockades the h pawn whereupon Black threatens to get a distant passed pawn on the Queen side, and this turns the tables in favour of Black. On 52 Bb4 Bc7! 53 d6 Bd8 54 Bc3 a5 55 Bxg7 Kxg7 56 h5 b4 57 Kf5 a4 58 h6+ Kh7 59 Ke6 b3 Black wins.

Now let us employ a little argument. After 52 Ba5 instead of 52 Bb4 do the bishops not balance each other? Well, not exactly. If White cannot afford to allow the advance ...a5 in return for playing d6, his bishop is fixed on a5, whilst Black's bishop isn't. That suggests that Black can try to play for zugzwang. On 52...Bd6 a move by White's B allows Black's B to support the advance ...a5.

This suggests that it is White who is in trouble and not Black.

Apart from being a GM Shipov is of course one of the best commentators available. If he did miss anything I suggest that the reason was that he was making a live commentary. He might easily change his mind after spending more time on examining the position.

May-13-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <If as <Eyal> has quoted Shipov mentions the idea of 45...Be5 46 Be6 Kf8 47 h4 Ke7 48 Bg8 Kf8 49 Bxh7 Kg7 50 Bxg6 Kxg6 51 Kg4 followed by 52 h5, it must be while commenting live on the game so that it becomes easier to miss this or that resource, because in this position Black just plays 51...Ng7! and blockades the h pawn whereupon Black threatens to get a distant passed pawn on the Queen side, and this turns the tables in favour of Black. On 52 Bb4 Bc7! 53 d6 Bd8 54 Bc3 a5 55 Bxg7 Kxg7 56 h5 b4 57 Kf5 a4 58 h6+ Kh7 59 Ke6 b3 Black wins [...] Apart from being a GM Shipov is of course one of the best commentators available. If he did miss anything I suggest that the reason was that he was making a live commentary. He might easily change his mind after spending more time on examining the position.>

The line that I quoted is actually from Shipov's (post-game) video analysis, as I mentioned explicitly, and it follows 44.[Kf3] <Nd6> 45.Bb4, so Ng7 isn't possible for Black and all the following is irrelevant.

May-13-10  Ulhumbrus: <The line that I quoted is actually from Shipov's (post-game) video analysis, as I mentioned explicitly, and it follows 44.[Kf3] <Nd6> 45.Bb4, so Ng7 isn't possible for Black and all the following is irrelevant.> Then perhaps 47...Kg7 was a move which Shipov missed when making a live commentary.
May-13-10  yalie: <Apart from being a GM Shipov is of course one of the best commentators available. If he did miss anything I suggest that the reason was that he was making a live commentary. He might easily change his mind after spending more time on examining the position. >

My comment was not meant to be disrespectful of Shipov at all. In fact, I am a big fan of his commentary. I was just interested in knowing whether, as claimed by Shipov in the live commentary and Topalov in various interviews, Anand was indeed lost in Game 10.

May-21-10  Ulhumbrus: On 44 Kf3 Nd6 45 Bb4 Ne5 46 Be6 Kf8 47 h4 Kg7 the Black King cannot prevent the move Bd8 as he can from the square e7, which may be one reason why Shipov gives the move 47...Ke7. On 48 Ba5 apart from Bd8 or Bc7, one interesting potential White threat is to play Ke4 and then offer the d5 pawn by d6 after which the invasion Kd5 may follow.
Dec-25-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Video analysis of this game: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDV....
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