chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing


register now - it's free!
Hikaru Nakamura vs Yury Shulman
"Nakam Out" (game of the day May-25-10)
US Championships (2010)  ·  French Defense: Winawer. Advance Variation (C18)  ·  0-1
To move:
Last move:

explore this opening
find similar games 5 more Nakamura/Y Shulman games
sac: 24...Rxg5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can step through the moves by clicking the and buttons, but it's much easier to simply use the left and right arrow keys on your keyboard.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with the default chess viewer, please see the Pgn4web Quickstart Guide.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-24-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Yes, according to the clock times on ICC it was played in less than a minute when Nakamura still had about 45 minutes, which left him plenty of time to ponder his mistake once Shulman played 23...Qd3... (Shahade on the live broadcast, as Nakamura's facial expressions were shown on the webcam: "He seems to be going through all the stages of grief").
May-24-10  MaxxLange: Perhaps he thought he needed to defend g2, so that he could move his bishop?

20...Rc8 seems to me like too routine of an attacking move to merit a !!

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: How long till CG gives us this as a puzzle of the day?


click for larger view

26...Qe3 is the killer move, but we need to deal with at least three plausible defences by white to bring home the full point:

27. Qh4 defends the Rf1

27. Rg1 builds a tight little fortress around the white king.

27. Rf1 parks the rook on a square where it is safe (for now).

Unfortunately, in each case the riposte is 27...Rc1 amd black either mates in short order or sweeps up huge amounts of material.

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kazzak: I know for certain as to the time use. The ICC board shows the time used for the moves. Nakamura spent exactly 12 seconds pondering Rh2. He had 3/4 of an hour on his clock when he did that ...

I went back to check not long after he played Rh2, scrolling through the moves, just to make absolutely certain. Couldn't believe he was that careless. He was.

His 21. Bg5, 22. f4 and 23. Rh2 seem applications to be relieved from duty, with Rh2 providing the final shot in the foot. The video was pretty merciless in showing his reaction, when he understood what he'd done ... tough game, chess. Without Rh2 he would have had a defensible position, particularly given his calculation skills and time advantage, but it wasn't made easier by jamming his queen and bishop into the corner, with f4 locking the gate. Then Rh2 which leaves a lone rook defending the back rank from what's coming, which means he can't have bothered to calculate what Shulman was up to.

I got the impression that Nakamura wanted to blow away Shulman, with a lackadaisical win. Instant karma.

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  goldfarbdj: <Shahade on the live broadcast, as Nakamura's facial expressions were shown on the webcam: "He seems to be going through all the stages of grief">

I've often noticed that when you blunder, or when your opponent uncorks a strong move, you go through the five stages of grief. Denial -- "I can't believe that move!" But it's right there on the board in front of you, so denial usually doesn't last long. Anger -- "How could I have missed that!" Bargaining -- "Maybe there's some way out of this if I look really hard." Every once in a while there actually is, so the bargaining phase can take a long time. When there isn't, you eventually sink into depression, and then acceptance, and you resign.

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Kazzak: If you want to study those phases, you can go to this video, which begins as Shulman makes his Rxg5 move, and which then just lingers on the players until Nakamura finally accepts his fate.

It's the one called "Live - Shulman Brilliancy" on this page:

http://stlouischessclub.org/2010-us...

May-25-10  Atking: Yes <goldfarbdj> I 'm trying to figure it. My opponent playing a move that kills me. "Oh what a wonderfull move. So an happy day..."

Indeed Shulmann played a very good game here. That's simple as it.

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Perhaps he thought he needed to defend g2, so that he could move his bishop?>

Yes, 23.Rh2 was probably played to counter the threat of Qg4, which is the most obvious after 22...Rc2. However, it also disconnects the rooks and creates a back-rank problem for White's king, by blocking the escape square...

May-25-10  radicalcation: I love Naka. But he was quoted in an interview after his 8th round match with Kamsky of saying something along the line of "who ever beats Shulman will win this championship". I wonder if there's anything behind this trash talk from Naka. Shulman seems very level-headed to me. I don't think he even fired back at Naka's comment, except OTB of course.

I guess what goes around comes around.

May-25-10  Marmot PFL: True to his pregame remarks, white was going all out to win, otherwise 21 Qe3 would probably just be a drawn ending. After 21...Qf5 i remember thinking he has to swallow his pride and retreat (or trade), cause 22 f4? just weakens the king too much and blocks his own pieces. This is just how Fischer played against the French as a young player, with the same results.
May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: After 37 Rg1,Rc1 is the quietus.
May-25-10  WhiteRook48: nothing helps white here
May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  mjmorri: Nakamura is very talented but is lacking "something" that will keep him from the very top. This game provides ample proof.
May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingfu: Another win for the French!

Nakamura is a great player. If I was that young and making a living from chess, I would probably have a huge ego. Many people have called this arrogance which I think is incorrect.

Games like this should educate one self in the ways of the World! Do we learn more from defeat or victory?

To lose as White in 27 moves to someone rated 120 points lower is a nice wake up call!

I think the ego made Nakamura play 1.e4 against a known French expert.

If I was going to play Shulman , it would be 1. d4!!

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: <Nakamura is very talented but is lacking "something" that will keep him from the very top.>

It's not what's lacking, it's his excess of blitz chess.

May-25-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  cornflake: <goldfarbdj: <Shahade on the live broadcast, as Nakamura's facial expressions were shown on the webcam: "He seems to be going through all the stages of grief"> I've often noticed that when you blunder, or when your opponent uncorks a strong move, you go through the five stages of grief. Denial -- "I can't believe that move!" But it's right there on the board in front of you, so denial usually doesn't last long. Anger -- "How could I have missed that!" Bargaining -- "Maybe there's some way out of this if I look really hard." Every once in a while there actually is, so the bargaining phase can take a long time. When there isn't, you eventually sink into depression, and then acceptance, and you resign.>

That's one of the most painful aspects of tournament chess-overlooking something on the board and getting quickly beaten. I don't know anybody that handles it well. Some people may be better at hiding their feelings than others but if the game means something to them then it is quite a shock to the nervous system.

May-25-10  hellopolgar: naka's strategy was getting skulman into time trouble, thus the careless move 23. Rh2

shulman made the right moves under time pressure, but we need to know that the outcome could very well have been the same as Morozevich vs M Vachier-Lagrave, 2009, if shulman had missed winning moves and faltered under time pressure like moro did.

people need to understand that grandmasters are humans, one single game does not mean ANYTHING, naka is a great player, imo, he is one of the most talented chess minds of today, but he isn't quite where kramnik/anand/topolov/carlson are yet. if he manages to break his "glass ceiling", he can be not only the championo of USA(again) but also the champion of the world.

May-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  RandomVisitor: Perhaps better for white was 9.dxc5 f6 10.c4 fxe5 11.cxd5 exd5 12.Nxe5 Nxe5 13.Bc3 +0.42/21
May-27-10  2Towers: When I was studying this Winawer line, I saw an interesting game by the legendary Bobby Fischer against William Hook which went: 6.bxc3 Qa5 7.Bd2 Qa4 8.Qg4 Kf8 9.Qd1 and routed the game in 28 moves. Fischer vs W Hook, 1970 I chose instead, 8. Nf3 Nc6 9.Qb1 and see what Black would do.
Jun-01-10  dumbgai: Hilarious game.
Jul-14-10  cjgone: Qe3 is the only move that's beneficial for black according to Rybka.. I don't even know how people see these moves.:(
Jul-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: I remember Naka looking at the camera after his blunder, and you could see the realization on his face that he was completely busted, and that chess fans where looking in at that very moment. He kept shaking his head during the proceeding moves, and looked dejected. Shulman on the other hand, appeared as if he was having a ball as the game was winding down...
Feb-03-11  patzer2: Who would have thought the innocent looking 23. Rh2? was a blunder, decisively weakening the back rank?

Yet 23...Qd3!! exploits the weakness with a winning attack, leading to the pretty finale with 26...Qe3! .

P.S.: Instead of 23. Rh2?, White appears to be OK after 23. Qf6 =.

Aug-20-11  Hesam7: <Bobsterman3000: This one was over as soon as Shulman found 20...Rc8!!>

Quite the opposite, 20. ... Rc8? is an inaccuracy White could have exploited this by 21. Qe3! Qxe3 22. Bxe3 with a very unclear ending. Better would be either 20. ... d4! or 20. ... Nf5! both with the idea of taking away the e3-square.

Jan-07-12  King Death: < hellopolgar: people need to understand that grandmasters are humans, one single game does not mean ANYTHING...>

This is true enough, and it should be explained to everybody looking to overanalyze every move with those precious engines.

<...naka is a great player, imo...but he isn't quite where kramnik/anand/topolov/carlson are yet.>

There's plenty of time for this kid to make a mark. In spite of nonsense I read on another page, the big invites aren't drying up for him just yet.

< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
alvis hope's favorite games
by alvishope1
Advance ["Game of the Day"]
from C18 French: Winawer [Black] by chess.master
Advance 6. ... Qa5
from Recent French Winawer games by cuppajoe
Beautiful games
by minnixxx
May 25: Nakam Out
from Game of the Day 2010 by Phony Benoni
23. Rh2? allows 23...Qd3!! -+ leading to 26...Qe3! -+
from Weakened Back Rank by patzer2
2010 USCC Rd9: French Def. Winawer Var.- N's "miscalculation"
from RPaterno1's favorite games- Misc. Openings by RPaterno1
US Championships, St. Louis 2010 Rd.9
from Favorite Games from (2010) by wanabe2000


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies