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Zoltan Ribli vs Harallamb Boshku
Novi Sad ol (Men) (1990), Novi Sad YUG, rd 3, Nov-19
Zukertort Opening: Sicilian Invitation (A04)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-11-14  gofer: At this point in time Bc6 is valuable - more valuable than Qh5!

<26 ... Bxd4!>
<27 gxh5 Rxf3>
<28 Bg2 Bxe3>


click for larger view

If white trades back its queen then black will be a piece up and the game will be over. So white has to hold onto its queen.

29 Qe1 Nd3!

29 Qc3 Raf8

29 Qe2 Raf8

It all looks pretty horrible for white...

~~~
Hmmm, didn't think this was a draw!!!!

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  hoodrobin: <Maybe> the point is... the ELO gap between the two players.
May-11-14  goodevans: Even after I'd played through the remaining moves it took me a full five minutes to convince myself that white couldn't wriggle out from the final position. Truly insane.
May-11-14  mel gibson: al wazir: Why is this a draw? What does black play after 29. Qe2 ?

I put it into DR4 64 bit & it confirms all the
moves after 26 as played above.

Yes it's a draw.

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I saw 34. ... Bxd4 (although at first I liked 34. ... Rxf3 but then 35. Nxc6) but I thought Black was winning. I saw the idea of bringing the R on a8 to f8 and by judgment decided Black was winning. I'll put it on my machine and see what it thinks!

I thought White had to give back the Q.

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Well Komodo agrees with the result. This was a great game by both players though. Black put pressure on White's Q-side with threats such as around move 16. to even, at the right moment sacrifice on e4 after taking on c3 - or maybe a4 although perhaps Ribli should have played 17. Bd4 but maybe then Bxd4 18. Qxd4 Ne6 and if 19.Qd2 Qc5+ with 20. ... f5 to follow or if 19. Qf2 f5! - so Ribli put his pieces in a good (?) defensive position, wisely. Then Black switched to the K-side via Qf8 and played the thematic and very good 21. ... f5 and began a good attack. Ribli defended well.

I recall seeing Ribli and say Adorjan playing as GM Murray Chandler used to send a weekly report to the Listener in New Zealand in the 80s, and games by Kasparov, Anderson, Chandler himself and Ribli et al featured. he even put my first game prize win - in the NZ Corresp. Champs ca 1982 or so in:

R Taylor vs L F Talbot, 1980

Not quite in the insane league though!

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: To draw White eventually blocks the B on c6 after taking on g6 first and so on. But it was pretty close. But they might have been in time trouble. Sometimes it is a good idea to bail out while the going is good if the opponent is quite higher rated.
May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I looked up Boshku and instead of a picture of him there was an advert for the new NZ (electric) trains! I should go on a train haven't been on one for years or and aeroplane either.

But old Boshku is a good old terrorist for sure! Here is another devilish game:

D Fekadu vs H Boshku, 2008

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: A truly insane puzzle. My solution was similar to Eric Morecambe's description of playing Grieg's piano concerto...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zH...

In other words, I thought of all the right moves ... I just didn't get them in the right order.

Turning on Fritzie and a couple of unexpected things emerge.

After 26...Bxd3 27. gxh5 Bxe3 seems to work just as well as 27...Rxf3. Then play might continue 28. Bxe3 Rxf3 29. Qxf3 Bxf3+

Better silicon might come up with a different conclusion, but Fritzie doesn't call this (or the game continuation) drawn. Very level but not absolutely drawn.

Incidentally the Once household is on cloud 9 at the moment. The Best Boy in the World has just won an academic scholarship to Charterhouse School. That's the culmination of several years of study, hard work and more than a few shredded nerves.

May-11-14  morfishine: <Once> Congratulations! That is really great!
May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Thanks!
May-11-14  M.Hassan: "Insane"
Black to play 26...?

26..........Rxf3
<if 27.gxh5 Rxf1#>
What if 27.Nxf3 Qxg4 28.Bg2 and no further progress will be achieved by Black. The White Knight is a superb one sitting on a central square d4 controlling f3 and c6 better be eliminated. So:

26............Bxd4
27.gxh5 Rxf3
28.Bg2 Bxe3
29.Qe2 Raf8
30.Rc3! Rf2
31.Qxe3 Rxg2
32.h4 Rxa2+
33.Kg1 Rg2+
34.Kh1 Re2+
35.Kg1 Rxe3
36.Rxe3
Black seems stronger. Continuation may take long.

May-11-14  patfoley: My analysis which is pretty involved shows a win for Black after Qe2 Raf8. The computer ( ipad Hiarcs) often tells me it is a draw, but I can always find a way to beat it. this is a pretty deep problem.
May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Once> Found the website for the English boarding school http://www.charterhouse.org.uk/. Charterhouse obviously offers an outstanding educational opportunity, and your son must have demonstrated great potential to win a scholarship.

P.S.: Just curious. Why does Charterhouse limit enrollment of girls to sixth form students?

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <abuzic> <He can make an offer white cannot refuse 26...Bxd4! threat ...Bxf3+ and ...Bxe3
White cannot refuse

27.gxh5 Bxe3>

Like 27...Bxe3, below, a bit better than 27...Rxf3. Gets the queens off of the board.


click for larger view

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Felt like I sucker punched myself on this Sunday puzzle, going for 26...Rxf3?? which loses to 27. Nxc6! .

My analysis of 26...Rxf3?? 27. Nxf3?? wasn't so awfully bad, however, as Black is winning after 27...Bxf3+ 28. Kg1 Qxg4+ 29. Bg2 Rf8! .

Plugged it into Fritz 12 and played it out move-by-move with this result:

<26... Bxd4!!>

26...Rxf3?? 27. Nxc6!

(Not 27. Nxf3?? 4 Bxf3+ 28. Kg1 Qxg4+ 29. Bg2 Rf8 30. Rf1 Ne4 31. Qd3 Rf5 32. Bf4 Bxf4 33. Rxf3 Qh4 34. h3 Nc5 35. Qe2 e5 36. Rf2 h5 37. Rc3 e4 38. Rf1 Qf6 39. Rc2 Qg5 40. Rc3 Kg7 41. Qe1 h4 42. Qe2 Bh2+ 43. Kxh2 Rxf1 44. Qxf1 Qe5+ 45. Kg1 Qxc3 )

27... Qxh2+ 28. Qxh2 Bxh2 29. Nxe7+ Kf8 30. Nxg6+ Kf7 31. Bxc5 Kxg6 32. Kg2 Rf6 33. Bd3+ Kg7 34. g5 Rf7 35. Bb6 Be5 36. Rf2

<27. gxh5 Rxf3 28. Bg2 Bxe3> Draw Agreed.

Playing out the final position move-by-move with Fritz yielded this possible continuation of play:

29. Qe2

(29. Qd1 Raf8 30. Rb1 R8f6 31. hxg6 hxg6 32. Ra1 Rf8 33. Rb1 R8f6=)

29... Raf8 30. Rg1 (not 30...h3?? 31. Rxh3#) 30...Bd4 31. Qd1 Nd3 32. hxg6 hxg6 33. Rd2 Nf2+ 34. Rxf2 Bxf2 35. Rf1 R8f5 36. a3 Kg7 37. Qe2 e5 38. Qd1 Be4 39. Qxd6 Bd4 40. Rxf3 Rxf3 41. Qe7+ Kg8 42. Qe6+ Kf8 43. Qc8+ Kf7 44. Qd7+ Kf6 45. h4 Rf1+ 46. Kh2 Bg1+ 47. Kg3 Bf2+ 48. Kh2 Bg1+ 49. Kg3 Bf2+ 50. Kh2 Bg1+ =.

May-11-14  Patriot: Material is even. White threatens 27.gxh5.

I have two candidates and I'm not sure which is best: 26...Rxf3 or 26...Qxg4.

26...Rxf3 27.gxh5 Rxf1# is clear.

26...Rxf3 27.Nxc6 Qxg4 28.Nxe7+ is interesting.

26...Qxg4 27.Nxc6 Qxf3+ 28.Bg2 is menacing.

26...Qxg4 27.Nxc6 Rxf3 28.Bg2 still seems a problem.

26...Rxf3 27.Nxc6 Qxg4 28.Bg2 transposes.

26...Rxf3 27.Nxf3 Bxf3+ 28.Kg1 Qxg4+ 29.Kf2 Ne4+

26...Rxf3 27.Nxc6 Qxg4 28.Bg2 Ne4 may be winning.

And what if 26...Qxg4 27.h3? 27...Bxf3+ 28.Nxf3 Qxf3+ should be ok.

I like 26...Rxf3 the best although I'm not sure it is.

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Patzer2> Like many English private schools its intake used to be boys only. The introduction of girls in the sixth form is a relatively recent development - well, relative to the school's 400 year history at least.

Maybe in the next 400 years they might move to full co-ed?

May-11-14  lost in space: Got that fairly quickly. My first Sunday since months.
May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The material is identical.

White threatens 27.gxh5 and 27.Nxc6, removing one of Black's best pieces.

The position of the white king invites to play 26... Rxf3 but it loses to 27.Nxc6 (27.gxh5 Rxf1#; 27.Nxf3 Bxf3+ 28.Kg1 (28.Bg2 Qxh2#) 28... Qxg4+ 29.Bg2 (29.Kf2 Ne4+ wins the queen) 29... Ne4 30.Qe1 unclear) 27... Qxg4 28.Nxe5 dxe5 29.Bxc5.

-----

Another bad option is 26... Qxg4 27.Nxc6 Qxf3+ 28.Bg2 Qh5 29.Nxe5 + -.

-----

Another idea is 26... Bxd4, removing White's best piece, 27.gxh5 (if 27.B(Q)xd4 Bxf3+ and 28... B(Q)xg4 wins two pawns) 27... Bxe3 28.Qxe3 Rxf3 29.Qxf3 (because of 29... Rxf1# and 29... Rxe3) 29... Bxf3+ 30.Bg2 Bxh5 31.Bxb7 Rf8 with one pawn for the exchange but better piece coordination.

-----

I don't know. It seems that 26... Bxd4 is the least bad of Black's options.

May-11-14  Moszkowski012273: Yes 27...Bxe3 is a stronger continuation for black.
May-11-14  James D Flynn: 26..Rxf3(threat Rxf1#) 27.Nxf3 Bxf3+ 28.Kg1 Qxg4+ 29.Bg2 Ne4( forcing the Q off its 31.Kxh2 31.2nd rank) 30.Qd3 Bxh2+31.Kxh2 Bxg2 32.Rxg2 Nf3+ 33.Kh1 Qh4+ 34.Rh12 Qxh2#
May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <Once> That is you? Where is Charterhouse School? Congratulations in any case!

I remember watching Eric Morecombe and Ernie Wise: kind of low key zany humour that I enjoyed in those days.

Re the game - my Komodo concludes it is slightly better for Black but in real chess to find a win would be quite hard. It would depend on the real factors of the game being played. The places of each in a tournament, whether they were tired, whether they were in time trouble, whether they were good mates and were going on the booze or out for a coffee that day (later); and of course nerves (considering the higher rated player fears to lose points and the lower has a chance to cash in his good play with a good (even great) game and a draw.

May-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I see, it for your son.
May-12-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: Charterhouse School is in Godalming, Surrey, England - less than 100 yards from where we live. And the glory very much goes to my son. I couldn't have passed those exams.
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