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Hikaru Nakamura vs Ruslan Ponomariov
Nakamura - Ponomariov Match (2011), St Louis, MO USA, rd 6, May-22
Queen's Gambit Declined: Charousek (Petrosian) Variation (D31)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 6 OF 6 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-23-11  capafan: 8....Qg6?! questionable on a long-term basis as the weakness created by the exchange of Q's ultimately proves to be Black's downfall.
May-23-11  Ulhumbrus: I suggest two main reasons why Ponomariev lost this game.

Firstly, The move 10...a6 is passive and accepts that Black's Queen side pawn majority is going to be a target instead of a weapon. It makes it more difficult for Black to organize the pawn advances ...b6 and ...c5.

More importantly than that, it was the dark squared bishops which were exchanged in the present game, instead of the white squared bishops as in the fourth game of the match.

If in the position after 10 b4 we replace the white squares bishops in this position with dark squared bishops, as in the fourth game of the match, we can see that it is easier for Black to play the pawn advances ...a5 and ...c5, as well as to attack White's King side.

In this game, with his pawns on White squares, Black was left with much the worse bishop and in fact deprived of all counterplay.

May-23-11  fab4: 11
< Ulhumbrus: >

I'm sorry but 10 .. a6 looks entirely natural.

I like 16.Kg3!.

The knight journey to d6 looked good and natural but looks superficial as the game unfolds.. g6 was an equally important square for the black knight to land on.

May-23-11  fab4: A black Knight on g6 then the break would've come on b5.. On d6, then h4...

White just seemed one step ahead and black had problems in his postion.. connecting his rooks ect...

May-23-11  Ulhumbrus: <fab4> On 10 b4 an alternative to 10...a6 is 10...Ne7 11 b5 Be6 so that on 12 bxc6 Black can play 12...Nb8xc6. If Black tries to play ...b6 and ...c5 after 10...a6, White may be able to foil the plan by playing a4 and a5, attacking the b6 pawn.
May-23-11  fab4: 10 .. a6 is a natural move to play in this position .. It certainly is not a mistake.

Sure, black can take on b5.. but why ?

May-23-11  fab4: I mean 'take on' as in take on. .. not capturing a peice ect...
May-23-11  goldenbear: In my opinion, 10.a6 is a mistake. In this position the minority attack should be welcomed! 10.a5! is good since after both 11.b5 Be6 12.Rb1 Nd7 13.bxc6 bxc6 and 12.Nf3 Nd7 13.Rc1 c5! 14.dxc5 Nxc5 15.Nxd5 Bxd5 16.Rxc5 Bxa2 17.b6 Rh5!, Black is fine.
May-23-11  fab4: But white plays f3 after a6... a6 is not a mistake. ...

ofcourse you don't have to play a6.. but as a move, it's timing and positional aspects are quite right.

May-24-11  LIFE Master AJ: 24...f5? ('??')

Not a good move, Black soon loses a Pawn ... I am surprised that a player of GM Ponomariov's caliber would play such an obviously bad idea.

May-24-11  Ulhumbrus: After 10...a6 if Black plays ...b6 to support the advance ...c5 and White plays a4 and a5, Black lacks a pawn on a7 to replace the b6 pawn eg 10...a6 11 f3 Be6 13 Bd3 Nd7 14 a4 b6 15 a5 c5 16 axb6
May-24-11  artemis: fab4, Ulhumbrus:

I think that the key point that Ulhumbrus is getting across is that after giving up his dark-squared bishop, Black proceeds to weaken every single dark square on the queen side with the move a7-a6. As a result of this Black is reduced to a very passive defense, because all of the key squares on which he can initiate action are dark squares. Because of his lack of space it is awkward to get his knights in positions to be able to help out on the dark squares.

May-24-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  doogie: Very pretty. Congratulations Hikaru.
May-25-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Ulhumbrus: <fab4> On 10 b4 an alternative to 10...a6 is 10...Ne7 11 b5 Be6 so that on 12 bxc6 Black can play 12...Nb8xc6........>

It's usually stronger to recapture with pawn in these Exchange QGD positions, as taking with a piece leaves weaknesses at d5 and b7, instead of just the one at c6.

May-27-11  Ulhumbrus: <perfidious: <Ulhumbrus: <fab4> On 10 b4 an alternative to 10...a6 is 10...Ne7 11 b5 Be6 so that on 12 bxc6 Black can play 12...Nb8xc6........> It's usually stronger to recapture with pawn in these Exchange QGD positions, as taking with a piece leaves weaknesses at d5 and b7, instead of just the one at c6.> In this case the recapturing on c5 with a pawn gives Black a backward c pawn instead of a potential passed pawn.

Black's real problem is that,as <artemis> has indicated, with the dark squared bishops exchanged off, the placing of Black's pawns on white squares deprives Black of counterplay because a white squared bishop cannot then support the advance of white squared pawns to black squares.

May-27-11  PinnedPiece: <LIFE Master AJ: 24...f5? ('??')

Not a good move, Black soon loses a Pawn >

If double question mark there, why not triple question mark for

30..Rf7, the move which actually loses the pawn, when 30..Nd6, it seems to me, preserves, and positions for attack?


click for larger view

Isn't this much better? And the actual blunder?

.

May-27-11  TheMacMan: nd6?????????? Na8+!
May-27-11  James Bowman: <TheMacMan: nd6?????????? Na8+!> They actually covered that rook losing move in the post mortem analysis, neat little tactic.
May-27-11  James Bowman: I have 30.Bxf5...Bxf5 31.Nxd5+...Kd6 32.Nxe7...Kxe7 33.e4...Bd7 with white winning, according to deep patzer!

Anyone want to run that through Rybka or something???

May-27-11  PinnedPiece: <James Bowman: <TheMacMan: nd6?????????? Na8+!> They actually covered that rook losing move in the post mortem analysis, neat little tactic.>

I'll say. Thx <MacMan> even though I am solidly behind PCs.

.

May-27-11  onlinechesslessons: I analyzed this game in a video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SNe...- positive/Negative feedback is definitely appreciated.

Cheers!

May-29-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Ulhumbrus: ... (i)n this case the recapturing on c5 with a pawn gives Black a backward c pawn instead of a potential passed pawn.>

This is fine in a pure ending where that passed pawn is free to run through, but that's a much tougher proposition here.

<Black's real problem is that,as <artemis> has indicated, with the dark squared bishops exchanged off, the placing of Black's pawns on white squares deprives Black of counterplay because a white squared bishop cannot then support the advance of white squared pawns to black squares.>

This misses the point-the remaining bishop hasn't any chance of supporting any such operation. The real problem is that Black lacks control over the dark squares (the consequence of placing pawns on light), and with queens off the board, this looms as a potential long-term problem, as his normal play in these QGD Exchange structures comes from play against the White king.

The slight negative to White's exchanging on g6 is the resultant weakness at h2, but Nakamura cleverly defuses Ponomaeiov's attempts to stir up trouble over that.

May-31-11  Ulhumbrus: <perfidious: <Ulhumbrus: ... (i)n this case the recapturing on c5 with a pawn gives Black a backward c pawn instead of a potential passed pawn.> This is fine in a pure ending where that passed pawn is free to run through, but that's a much tougher proposition here.>

It's tougher still if the pawn is backward

<<Black's real problem is that,as <artemis> has indicated, with the dark squared bishops exchanged off, the placing of Black's pawns on white squares deprives Black of counterplay because a white squared bishop cannot then support the advance of white squared pawns to black squares.>

This misses the point-the remaining bishop hasn't any chance of supporting any such operation. The real problem is that Black lacks control over the dark squares (the consequence of placing pawns on light), and with queens off the board, this looms as a potential long-term problem, as his normal play in these QGD Exchange structures comes from play against the White king.>

It does not miss the point. Black's problem is caused by not just one thing but two,namely, a white squared bishop and the emplacement of pawns on white squares. A black squared bishop would support advances of white squared pawns to black squares whilst the white squared bishop would support advances of black squared pawns to white squares. As it is, Black has pawns placed on squares of the same colour as his bishop. That deprives him of counterplay as the bishop cannot then support their advance.

Jun-08-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Ulhumbrus> This was as obviously futile discussion, as you were determined to contradict anything I had to offer.

After playing the White side of these QGD Exchange structres for twenty-five years, I'll not have you talk down to me as though I'm an idiot.

If you're after constructive discussion, I'm for that, but your condescension was unnecessary.

Jul-25-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Pos. after <13.Nge2>:


click for larger view

<White's advantage is small but clear. He has the better bishop, better development, better center, and the choice to initiate play on the queenside or in the center.> Larry Kaufman

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