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Varuzhan Akobian vs Imed Abdelnabbi
Abu Dhabi Masters op (2000)  ·  Nimzo-Indian Defense: Huebner. Rubinstein Variation (E42)  ·  1-0
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sac: 23.Bxh7+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-03-11  mqhelisi: .....or at least on our line instead of 26.Qg4+

26.Qxf6! mate in 2

Aug-03-11  Bumcrot: 26. Qxf6 is answered by Qxd4.
Aug-03-11  mworld: <Bumcrot: 26. Qxf6 is answered by Qxd4.>

then 27. Rh8#

Aug-03-11  CHESSTTCAMPS: Forget the pawn deficit, black's chaotic development is simply no match for the centralized and cohesive white force. With the minor pieces so far afield, there are almost no useful defenders of the black king. Therefore

23.Bxh7+ (Qf5 g6 24.Nf6+ Kg7 offers defensive chances) and white's attack almost plays itself:

A) 23... Kxh7 24.Rh5+ Kg8 (Kg6 25.Qf5#) 25.Nf6+! gf 26.Qxf6! (Qg3+? Qg5 27.Rxg5+ fg 28.Qxg5+ Kh7 29.Qxa5 Rxd4 leaves black alive) and R/Qh8# on move 25 or 26 is not preventable.

A.1) 24... Qh6 25.Rxh6+ Kxh6 (gh 26.Nf6+ K moves 27.Nxd7 Bxd7 28.Qd5) 26.Qh3+ Kg6 27.Nf4+ Kf6 (Kg5 28.Qh5+ wins another piece) 28.Qh4+ g5 29.Qh6+ Ke7 30.Qxg5+ picks up the loose Na5.

B) 23... Kh8 24.Rh5 Bc6 (otherwise 25.Bc2+ picks up a piece) 25.Qh3 g6 (Rxd5 26.Bf5+ ) 26.Bxg6+ Kg7 27.Rh7+ Kxg6 28.Qh5#

Time for review...

Aug-03-11  CHESSTTCAMPS: Line A should have read "on move 27 or 28 is not preventable".

The way Akobian grabbed the initiative so early is a cautionary example for a NimzoIndian player. Time to play "find black's losing error"....

Aug-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I chose 23 Ne7+ because it seemed the least complicated way to go.


click for larger view

Black has just two responses. If black takes the knight, white recaptures and is up an exchange plus a pawn.

However, if black tries 23...Kh8, white wins right away with 24 Qf5, theatening mate in one and double attacking the knight.


click for larger view

Black must respond 24...Qh6, thus losing the knight.

Aug-03-11  rapidcitychess: I failed by trying to play Nf6+ before the rook check.'

I think white still wins though, with (23.Bxh7+ Kxh7 24.Nf6+ gxf6) 25.Rh5+ and A.25...Qh6 26.Rxh6+ Kxh6 27.Qf4+ Kg7 (Random pick, the idea is always the same. Just get the queen on g4.) 28.Qg4+ Kh7 29.b3 Bb5 (If Bc6, then 30.b4 Nc4 31.d5 and black is over loaded.) 30.a4 Bc6 31.b4 Nc4 32.d5 and white wins the knight. B.25...Kg6 26.Rg4+ Qg5 27.Rxg5 fxg5 28.d5 Bb5 (28...b5 b3) 29.a4 and white wins the bishop.

I think my analysis is correct. Please tell me if I missed something.

Aug-03-11  Creg: I'm looking at 23.Nxf6+, I like the way it pry's open the black king.

23.Nxf6+ gxf6 24.Bxh7+ Kxh7 25.Rh5+ with Qg4+ to follow. Black will have to give up the queen, but does white have enough compensation?

Oh, wait, I see the knight on a5 is unguarded.

25...Kg8 26.Qg4+ Qg5 27.Rxg5+ fxg5 28.Qxg5+ Kh7 29.Qxa5

It's Q+R vs R+R+B, this should be good enough for a win, but there should be something more here. I must be missing something, or going the wrong route.

-------
Different move order, but same conclusion. I will check kibitz to see if 23.Bxh7+ is better then 23.Nxf6+

Aug-03-11  LIFE Master AJ: 23.BxP/h7+.

Looks like a nice attack ... if Black takes, but I got "lost in the woods" trying to figure out the win in the declined line. (I also had a problem with a ghost piece on d3 - Black kept taking it in my head, but when I played through it on the computer, it wasn't there.)

Aug-03-11  VincentL: "Medium/Easy".

The first move I see here is 23. Nf6+

If 23.....exf6 24. Qf4+. After 24.....Kh8 25. Qh3 and black has no good defence against Qxh7 mate.

Black can play 24.....Qg5 and after 25. Rxg5+ fxg5 26.Qg5+ white emerges with a material advantage of Q + 2P for R + N.

If black declines the knight and plays 23.....Kh8, white simply continues Nxd7 winning the exchange.

I think this is it. Letīs check.

Aug-03-11  VincentL: Too hasty.

In my first line, 25.....Qxd3 wins for black.

I saw this when I moved the pieces.

Aug-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  dzechiel: <Dr. J: <dzechiel> Unfortunately, I think your 26 Qh3 is refuted by 26...Bc2, covering h7, since h6 is covered by the Queen on d2.>

I stand corrected. Good catch, Dr J.

Aug-03-11  LIFE Master AJ: Varuzhan Akobian (2438) -
Imed Abdelnabbi (2408);
[E42]
10th Abu Dhabi Open (R#7) / 02,09,2000.
[A.J. Goldsby I & Fritz 12]

1.d4 Nf6; 2.c4 e6; 3.Nc3 Bb4; 4.e3 c5; 5.Nge2 cxd4; 6.exd4 d5; 7.a3 Be7; 8.Nf4 0-0; 9.cxd5 Nxd5; 10.Ncxd5 exd5; 11.Bd3 Nc6; 12.0-0 Bg5; 13.Be3 Qd6; 14.Nh5 Qh6; 15.Qf3 Be6; 16.Rad1 Na5; 17.Nf4 Rad8; 18.Rfe1 Bd7; 19.Nxd5 Ba4; 20.Rb1 Rd7; 21.Bxg5 Qxg5; 22.Re5 Qd2;

Now we have reached the position for today's POTD.


click for larger view

23.Bxh7+! Kxh7!?;
This loses quickly ... but the declined line wasn't much better.

[RR 23...Kh8; 24.Rh5 Rxd5; 25.Qxd5 Bd1; 26.Qxa5 Qxa5; 27.Rxa5 Kxh7; 28.Rxd1, ]

24.Rh5+ Kg8, ('?')

[ The only move was: 24...Qh6▢; but I am sure that Black would have resigned before playing this. ]

25.Nf6+! gxf6; 26.Qg4+?!,
Not the most efficient.

[ Best was: >/= 26.Qxf6! Qxf2+; 27.Kxf2, ( ) and 28.Rh8#. ]

26...Qg5; 27.Rxg5+ fxg5; 28.Qxg5+ Kh7; 29.Qxa5, Black Resigns.

1-0

Aug-03-11  LIFE Master AJ: I did the above to verify that White did indeed miss a simple mate ...
Aug-03-11  scormus: <Creg: I'm looking at 23.Nxf6+, .... Oh, wait, I see the knight on a5 is unguarded.>

I just noticed that too. Seems 23 Nf6+ isnt so bad after all, if B declines the N he drops an R and if he declines the B he's no better than taking it.

Aug-03-11  morfishine: <Patriot> I read your <But we never hear about "When you see a winning move, play it!" or when this advice should be followed> Excellent advice and explains in this case why he went with 26.Qg4+. He saw that win first and a win is a win is a win, no matter how it finishes. Very good.

<Jimfromprovidence> Ingenious as always

<LIFE Master AJ> Excellent analysis wraps it all up

Aug-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheBish: Akobian vs I Abdelnabbi, 2000

White to play (23.?) "Medium/Easy"

White gets at the Black king by forcing him out of his comfort zone!

23. Bxh7+! Kxh7

Or 23...Kh8 24. Rh5 Rd6 (24...Rxd5 25. Qxd5 Bd1 26. Qxa5) 25. Bg6+ wins the queen, since 25...Kg8 26. Ne7 is mate.

24. Rh5+ Kg8

Or 24...Qh6 25. Rxh6+, which lasts a little longer for Black, but loses just the same.

25. Nf6+! gxf6 26. Qxf6 and Black just has a spite check (26...Qd1+ or 26...Qe1+) or 26...Qh6 before being mated on h8.

Aug-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  David2009: Akobian vs I Abdelnabbi, 2000 White 23?

White wins Q for R+B in (main line) 23.Bxh7+ Kxh7 24. Rh5+! (not 24.Qh5+ Qh3!) Kg8 25.Nf6+ gxf6 forced 26.Qg4+ Qg5 forced 27.Rxg5+ fxg5 28.Qxg5+ Kh7 or h8 29.Qxa5 and the dust settles to show that White has won QPP for RN.

Black can decline the sacrifice with 23...Kh8 when 24.Rh5 threatens to win material with a discovered check and leaves White two Pawns ahead. Time to check:
====
I got the game line. Puzzle position:


click for larger view

Crafty End Game Trainer check: http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-t... The EGT defends differently and loses differently.

Aug-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheBish: Interesting that Var missed 26. Qxf6. Maybe he was in time pressure, because I was looking at 26. Qg4+ at first, until I saw the more precise win.
Aug-03-11  abuzic: 23.Bxh7+
If 23...Kxf7? 24.Rh5+ Kg8? 25.Nf6+ gxf6 and mate in 3: 26.Qxf6 26...black sacrifices the Q somewhere 27.white takes the Q 27...black plays anything and mate follows 28.Rh8# or Qh8#. Not to be mated rightaway black should give material:24...Qh6 24.Rxh6+ gxh6 25.Nf6+ more material or mate.

If black declines and plays 23...Kh8 then 24.Rh5 Rxd5 25.Qxd5 and black is totally disorganized.

After white played 20.Rb1? black could ease the tension with 20...Re1. White could have kept the very strong attack with 20.Bxg5 Qxg5 21.Re5 f5 22.Ne7+ Kh3 23.Rde1.

Black's play seems purposeless, his N & B dancing outside the arena

Aug-03-11  stst: Main line: 23.BxP+
IF (A):23....KxB, 24.Qh3 Kg6, 25.Qh5#
IF (B):23....Kg8, 24.Rh5 Bd1(*), 25.Rh8#
If (B*)24....g6, 25.Rh8 Kg7, 26.Qh7#

Alt. route:
23.Qg3 threatening Nf6+...

Aug-04-11  abuzic: <Correction: abuzic: ......
After white played 20.Rb1? black could ease the tension with 20...Re1.>
After white played 20.Rb1? black could ease the tension with 20...Rfe8.
Aug-04-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The Hitchcockian finish is the "murder" of the innocent knight on the a file by white's queen.
Aug-05-11  sevenseaman: I missed this POTD as my ISP failed that day just after I had had a look at the home page.

I solved it setting up the board from memory. I had two viable solutions written down, as my ISP took nearly 36 hours to resume.

a) 23. Bxh7 Kxh7 24. Rh5+ Kg8 25.Nf6+ gxf6 26. Qg4+ Qg5 27. Rxg5 fxg5 28. Qxg5+ Kh7 29. Qxa5 with white garnering enough material for a win. (same as game score)

b) I also wrote down 23. Ne7+ Kh8 (assuming Black will choose not to lose the exchange) 24. Qf5 Qh6▢ 25. QxH7+ Qxh7 26. Bxh7 Kxh7 Rh5# achieving the famed Anastasia's mate in this position;


click for larger view

Aug-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: Akobian vs I Abdelnabbi, 2000
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