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Le Quang Liem vs Leinier Dominguez Perez
SPICE Cup (2011), Lubbock USA, rd 10, Oct-25
Slav Defense: Soultanbeieff Variation (D16)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-06-11  sevenseaman: <BOSTER>

<Black could play 29...Qf1+ 30.Kxf1 Rf8+ 31.Kg1 Rf7 "continue fighting">.

Black does even better than what you suggest. He soldiers on with;

<29..Kf7 30.Qxg7+ Ke6 31.Qe5+ Kf7 32.Qf6+ Ke8 33.Bb4 >

Now Black faces mate on e7 as well as f8. White Q guards a1 from a Q check to her own K. But Black does not throw in the towel.

He fights on with;

<33...Qa1+ 34. Qxa1 Kd8 35. Qh8+ Be8 36. Qxh7> and now he hardly can have a hope.

<36...Kc8 37. Bd6 Bd7 38. Qc2+ Kd8 39. Bc7+ Ke7 40. Qe4+ Be6 41. Qxa8> 1-0


click for larger view

So, from the puzzle position onwards White is a winner. I cannot say if Black missed any chances earlier in the game because I do not ever shift the goalposts.

<The POTD <mandate is <to find the best <play <from the puzzle position onwards>>>>>.

Nov-06-11  naruto00122: this should not be insane?

I have seen medium puzzles harder than this one

Nov-06-11  morfishine: <Patriot> Thanks, I must've been suffering from "chess blindness". I kept trying to "force" 31.Qf6+ instead of 31.Qe5+; Of course, 31.Qe5+ is THE MOVE. If 31.Qf6+?? then Black king runs with 31...Kd5, the problem I kept running into. :)
Nov-06-11  stst: is it too easy, or just missed something big?
27.Rd7 e5
28.Re7 Kf8 (what else is tougher?)
29.Qxe5 Re8
30.Qxg7#
Nov-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sastre: If 28.Re7, Black has 28...Qb5 29.Rxe5 Qd7 30.Qe2 Bg6 .
Nov-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: I suspect the solution starts with 27.Rd7! e5 28.Rxg7+!! Kxg7 29.Qxe5+ Kg6, but it's too "insane" for me without spending a huge amount of time on it.
Nov-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Very nice, and not <so> hard if you see it (which I didn't).
Nov-06-11  BOSTER: <stst> < is it too easy...?>. Read everything from page 1.
Nov-06-11  scormus: once again, finding the first move is not the challenge, or maybe even the 2nd and 3rd.

But after that W's difficulties stem from the choice between plausible possibilities. Well done <Jackalope> in your 2nd line for seeing it clearly enough to find the killer. 33 Bb4 (7th move after the puzzle position) threatens # on both e7 and f8 so the only way for B to fight on is to give up the Q.

According to the posts there are other ways to win but the IMO above is by far the clearest and most forcing.

Nov-06-11  scormus: <FSR: ... 28.Rxg7+!! <instead of 28 Qxe5!!>>

Also winning by force (yes, I think so), but I agree W would have to calculate rather accurately so as not to be caught out by Qa1+. An awkward choice, just what I found difficult when I tried it myself

Nov-06-11  TheBish: Le Quang Liem vs L Dominguez, 2011

White to play (27.?) "Insane"

White is down two pawns, but with the initiative and opposite-colored bishops, I'm sure this won't be a factor. I'm willing to bet a bishop (maybe even a rook!) that White has a mating attack. Quite sure of the first move, but the follow-up is a little murky.

27. Rd7! e5

The only defense, blocking White's queen from g7 while attacking the rook -- a nice dual-purpose move. Is it enough for Black?

28. Qxe5!!

I'm fairly certain of this move after a cursory analysis. For the price of a rook, White buys a critical tempo for the attack, putting the queen in front of the bishop! Meanwhile, Black's bishop on d7 will nicely cut of an escape square for Black's king, or shield the 7th rank from defense from Qa6-b7.

28...Bxd7 (forced) 29. Bc3 Kf7

Or 29...Kf8 30. Qxg7+ Ke8 will transpose to line (A) below.

30. Qxg7+ and now:

(A) 30...Ke8 31. Qh8+!

I missed this important move the first time around. The purpose is to maneuver the WQ to f6 with tempo, and to prevent Ke8-d8.

31...Kf7 (Ke7) 32. Qf6+ Ke8 33. Bb4! with the dual treats of mate on e7 or f8, i.e. 33...Qe2 34. Qf8#.

(B) 30...Ke6 31. Qe5+ Kf7 32. Qf6+ Ke8 (transposing to the same position above) 33. Bb4! and wins as in variation (A).

Nov-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Alphonse1973: ... before the 28th move of White, Black had a menace: if 28. Re7? (instead of the right move played: 28.Qxe5!!), then 28...Rf8 29. Qxe5?? Qf1!! 30.Kxf1 Bd3++ 31.Kg1 Rf1 mate.>

<notyetagm: 28.xe5!
Maybe Dominguez was attracted by
the variation 28.e7 f8 29.xe5??
f1+! 30.xf1 d3+ 31.g1 f1#.>

Very nice trick! Reminiscent of K Thompson vs F Rhine, 1992 - though even nicer since the f1 square on which the queen sacs itself is empty, rather than occupied by a rook as in my game.

Nov-06-11  LIFE Master AJ: This one looked too simple to me, 27.Rd7, e5; 28.QxP/e5! BxR/d7; 29.Bc3. Black can squirm a bit, but he's not going anywhere. Meanwhile, all of Black's pieces are on HORRIBLE squares, the BR on a8, the Bishop on d7, the BQ on a6, which doesn't even have a check - as a1 is covered.

I spent 5-10 minutes looked at just a couple of variations ... maybe easiest Sunday puzzle ever. (For me, at least.)

Nov-06-11  tud: I found quite easy the first moves but Qh8 is the real beauty which I skipped. Seriously, the real insane ones are the endgames...
Nov-06-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  hedgeh0g: Very easy, since I went over this game just a couple of days ago. It's truly painful to be as helpless as Black in the final position.
Nov-06-11  LIFE Master AJ: I decided to wash this through the computer ... to see if everything was as easy as I thought it was.

(In the game after:)
26.exf5 Bxf5 ;

This is the critical position ...
Black may have thought he was on his way to an easy point.


click for larger view

White has to play actively ...
the first player is down material, if he does not do something ...

(...) and do it quick ... he is destined to lose.

27.Rd7,
White - down two buttons - has to play actively ... this does not even merit an exclam, its the only active move that White has.

27...e5; 28.Qxe5!, (Maybe - '!!')
The ♖-sack on g7 might win, but ultimately I rejected it, as this seems to make things even more complicated.

28...Bxd7; 29.Bc3 Kf7; 30.Qxg7+ Ke8;
This is probably best.

*** *** *** *** *** ***

(Mainly) - what I looked at was:
30...Ke6; 31.Qe5+ Kf7; 32.Qf6+ Ke8T; (Forced, or " ▢ ")

(Not </= 32...Kg8?; 33.Qg7#.)

33.Bb4, " " (Its a mating web, see the diagram below.)


click for larger view

and Black has to play "give-away" to prevent mate.)

*** *** *** *** *** ***

31.Qh8+! Ke7; 32.Qf6+! Ke8; 33.Bb4, " "

Once more, we have reached the magic position, by transposition - (see the last diagram) ... (and) Black cannot survive.

This is probably the first time - in maybe a year - when my analysis with the computer did not reveal something that I had not already looked at. (Amazing.)

Its STILL an interesting game ... and makes a wonderful POTD. Thanks "Chess Games" for yet another enjoyable and challenging Sunday.

Nov-06-11  LIFE Master AJ: By the way, for the above analysis, I used Houdini 1.5. Then I checked it with Fritz 12 and Deep Shredder. (Nothing changed.)
Nov-06-11  RandomVisitor: <fokers13>After 18.Nd5!


click for larger view

Rybka 4.1 d=19

1. (0.84): 18...Qxa4 19.Ne7+ Kh8 20.Bd5 Qxd1 21.Rxd1 exd5 22.f3 Re8 23.Nf5 Nc5 24.Nd6 Re6 25.Nxb7 Nxb7 26.Qb5 Nc5 27.Bg3 a6 28.Qb4 Ned7 29.Rxd5 Rc8 30.Qd4 Nb3 31.Qd3 Nbc5 32.Qc3 Nf6 33.Rd6 Rxd6

2. (0.97): 18...Qd6 19.Nf6+ gxf6 20.Rxd6 Rxd6 21.f3 Nc5 22.Bc3 Rad8 23.a5 Ba6 24.Qe1 bxa5 25.Bxa5 R8d7 26.Bc3

Nov-06-11  rhickma4: I seem to remember a similar theme not to long ago. The black pieces in disarray, and a simple mate threat on the diagonal winng.
Nov-07-11  LIFE Master AJ: Le Quang Liem (2717) -
L. Dominguez Perez (2710)

[D16]

5th SPICE Cup / GpA

Lubbock, (TX); USA (R#10), 25,10,2011.
[A.J.G. / Part I]

Chess Games - POTD / Sunday; Nov. 06, 2011.

1.d4 d5; A double-QP game.
(Who says they have to be dull?)

2.Nf3 Nf6; 3.c4 c6; 4.Nc3 dxc4; 5.a4 e6!?;
Black closes in his LS/QB.


click for larger view

I think 5...♗f5 is the main line, see below.

[ For a detailed analysis of:
5...Bf5; 6.e3 e6; 7.Bxc4, " " see MCO-15; page #484, columns # 64-66 ... ... ... and all corresponding notes

See also: http://www.ajschess.com/thegotmman/.... ]

6.e4 Bb4; 7.Bg5 Qa5!?;
According to the "Power-Book" ... the main line is 7...b7-b5; here for Black.


click for larger view

This is interesting ... Black gets a lot of play here.

White's next move looks forced.
8.Bd2 c5!;
Black immediately begins to tear down White's center.

9.Bxc4 cxd4; 10.Nxd4 0-0; 11.Qe2 Nc6!?;
Fritz prefers 11...Rd8; here.

12.Nc2!?,
White had a chance to break up Black's Pawn structure ... but maybe this was a prepared line.

[Better was:
¹12.Nxc6 bxc6; 13.0-0, " = "
when White might have a small edge here. - Houdini 1.5 ]

Now Fritz likes 12...Rd8 here.
12...Ne5; 13.Ba2!?,
Either this is a slightly inferior move ... or its a trap like a bottomless pit!

[Better was: 13.Bb5! a6; 14.f4 Ng6; 15.Nxb4 Qxb4; 16.Bd3, " " and White is a little better. - Fritz 12. ]

13...Rd8; 14.0-0 b6; 15.Nxb4 Qxb4; 16.Rfd1 Bb7; 17.Be1!,
This is best ...


click for larger view

... we have now reached a critical position in this game.

Nov-07-11  LIFE Master AJ: Le Quang Liem (2717) -
L. Dominguez Perez (2710)

[D16]

5th SPICE Cup / GpA

Lubbock, (TX); USA (R#10) / 25,10,2011.
[A.J.G. / Part II]

Chess Games - POTD / Sunday; Nov. 06, 2011.

17.Be1!, This is best ...


click for larger view

... we have now reached a critical position in this game.

[Worse was: </= 17.f3 Qxb2; " " & Black is clearly better. ]

17...Nxe4?; (An error.)
Black is tempted to take the Pawn right away ... however, this is a mistake.

[Probably better was:
17...Rxd1; 18.Rxd1 Nxe4;
19.f3 Qc5+; 20.Kh1 Nxc3;
21.Bxc3 Nc6; 22.Rd7, with compensation
(and) White has good play. ]

18.Nb5!?, ('?!')
This is not the best.

[Much better was:
18.Nd5!, " " (Maybe - ' ± ')
please see RV's analysis. ]

18...Rxd1; 19.Rxd1 Qxa4;
Black is (now) clearly better. (And two Pawns ahead!)

20.b3!? Qa6T; (forced) 21.Bb1 f5?;
A logical-looking move, but one that turns out very badly.

[Better was: 21...Rf8!; " "
Fritz 12 & Houdini 1.5 ]

22.f3 Bc6; 23.fxe4 Bxb5;
24.Qb2 Nd3!?; (Maybe - '?!')
Its hard to believe, but this might be the losing move for Black.

[Better was: 24...Ng6; 25.exf5 exf5; 26.Bxf5 Re8; ∞ and Black could even be slightly better here. ]

25.Bxd3 Bxd3; 26.exf5 Bxf5;
This is the (main) critical position ... Black may have thought he was on his way to an easy point.


click for larger view

White has to play actively ...
the first player is down material, if he does not do something ... and do it quick ... he is destined to lose.

27.Rd7,
This is best. (The most active.)

[ 27.Qe5 Qb7; ]

27...e5; 28.Qxe5!, (Maybe - '!!')
White sacks a Rook, but will quickly achieve an overwhelming position.

[</= 28.Rxg7+!? Kxg7; 29.Qxe5+ Kg6; ∞ ]

28...Bxd7; 29.Bc3, " "
Black - apparently - resigns.

[29.Bc3 Kf7; 30.Qxg7+ Ke6;
31.Qe5+ Kf7; 32.Qf6+ Ke8▢;
This was forced.
(<32...Kg8?; ('??') 33.Qg7#.)
33.Bb4, " " & White wins.
(See my earlier analysis.) ]

1-0

Nov-07-11  M.Hassan: "Insane" White to play 27.?
White is two pawns down.

27.Rd7 threatening mate on g7
27...........e5
28.Qxe5 Bxd4
29.Bc3 Kf8
30.Bb4+ Kg8
31.Qd5+ Kh8
32.Qxa8+ Qc8
33.Qf3
I don't know where I have gone wrong because this looks more like drawish than a win.

Jul-30-14  posoo: LOOK AT ALL DIS UNLASIS.

This is PRECISELY why computors have ruined chess and most of life.

ALL OF YOU - it is a NICE DAY OUTSIDE! go play blitz in da park!

Aug-18-17  Saniyat24: 12.Nc2 felt kind of an uncommon move while I was playing the moves...!
Aug-18-17  Saniyat24: 20.b3 was a very good move, but to these Grandmasters...this kind of moves must take very little time, as they always calculate ahead...!
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