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Robin W Haldane vs Ian Snape
Coulsdon Premiership Int (2007), CCF, rd 8, Aug-31
Sicilian Defense: Dragon Variation. Yugoslav Attack (B78)  ·  1-0
Move:
Last:

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find similar games 187 more games of I Snape
sac: 21.fxe5 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-15-17  Walter Glattke: c: 43.Kb5
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: 25. hxg6 is the winner.
Jul-15-17  Whitehat1963: Clearly, fame ... isn't ... everything.
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  jith1207: At first glance, puzzle position looks incredible, as the white queen seems imprisoned while being one piece down at least.

The irony is the black king seems imprisoned at same region in the final position with its queen having no possibility of saving him.

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: I think the first move is probably d7, and if queen takes d7 then 26. Qxg5+ Kf8 (if Kh8 27. Qf6+ to fix the pawn on f7, Kg8 28. h6 and curtains)

27. Qh6+ Kg8 (If Ke7, then 28. Rxe2+, which may not be decisive because black was already a piece up, but it looks pretty good)

28. Qxg5+ Kf8 (if Kh8, déjà vu: 29. Qh6+ Kg8 30. h6 and game over)

28...Kf8 is much trickier than Kh8 because h6 immediately would allow the advance of the f pawn and Qf6 immediately would allow Bxh5 (in which case Qg5+ doesn't win the bishop because he can just cover with Bg3).

Nevertheless, I bet (up to a nickel) that it's 29. Qf6 Bxh5 30. Qh8+ Qe7 31. d6+ and white's got to win the rook or possibly mate.

Then there's a whole different line (I'm beginning to understand why exhaustive analyses are called exhaustive!) with 25. d7 Rd5 for example, followed by 26. Qd6 attacking the Rook and threatening Qc6/Qc8. Rook moves and now Qc6 or possibly g4 if the bishop is pinned or possibly [tilt]....time to look

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: : Having looked at the game line, I see that my final variant was quite close, which allows me to conclude:

1) dat I too coo for schoo!
2) this is a "equal opportunities for patzers" week

3) that there were still a hell of lot of calculations to make from the point where I left off, so I probably would messed up eventually (whoops, I forgot, I should use every opportunity for self-glorification: But I no doubt would have found the winning combination over the board, as I always do! This was really Monday material -- tisk, tisk...)

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: I got white's first two moves, but didn't anticipate 26...Bb5. But 27. Rxd5 Bxc6 28. dxc6 is pretty clearly winning.
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: GOTD Title: Snape Hunting
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: The hunting of the snape.

:)

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For the benefit of novice players like my young Grandsons, there are at least two winning techniques after 27. Rxe5! Bxc6 28. dxc6 Kf8 (diagram below)


click for larger view

1) White can play a patient waiting game as in the game continuation because once White moves either his Queen or his Queen, he is lost.

Because White will eventually be compelled to move one of those pieces, we say he is in Zugzwang (a situation where a player would prefer not to make a move, because any move weakens their position.)

Two variations of the Zugwang tactic here involve the game continuation with the patient waiting move 29. Kd2, where Black immediately loses patience with 29...f5 and allows 30. Rxf5+ to force the King to move.

Another patient waiting move that wins in this zugzwang situation is 29. g4 when play might go 29.g4 a6 ( 29...Qb8 30.c7 Qxc7 31.Re8+ Kg7 32.d8=Q ) 30.Re1 a5 31.Re2 f6 32.Re3 Kf7 33.Re8 Qxe8 34.dxe8=Q+ Kxe8 35.Kd2 Ke7 36.Kd3 Kd6 37.Ke4 Kxc6 38.Kf5 with an easily won King and Pawn ending.

2) The other winning technique says forget about zugzwang and waiting around and being patient. I don't want to be patient at all. So lets force the issue right away with 29. Re8+ Qxe8 30. dxe8(Q)+ Kxe8 30. g4! (diagram below)


click for larger view

which gives White has a winning King and Pawn endgame (e.g. 30...Kd8 31. Kd2 Kc7 32. Ke3 Kxc6 33. Ke4 Kd7 34. Kf5 .)

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Cheapo by the Dozen: I didn't even bother calculating every line after ... Qxd7. But yes -- it was clear what White had to try.
Jul-15-17  RandomVisitor: After 22.exd6


click for larger view

Stockfish_17061704_x64_modern: <6 hours computer time>

<-1.80/57 22...f6 23.e5 Rb5 24.Rxb5 Bxb5 25.Kb1> Kh8 26.d7 fxe5 27.Qd6 Bxd7 28.Rd1 Rf7 29.Qxe5+ Kg8 30.Rd6 Qe7 31.Qd5 Kf8 32.Qd4 Ke8 33.Ra6 Bc8 34.Ra4 Qf6 35.Qxb4 Rc7 36.Qa5 Re7 37.Ka2 Bf5 38.Qd5 Kf8 39.Qc5 Qe5 40.Qf2 Kg7 41.Ra6 Be6 42.c4 Rf7 43.Qd2 Rd7 44.h6+ Kf7 45.Qf2+ Qf6 46.Qe3 Re7 47.Qc1 Qxh6 48.Ra5 Qf6 49.Qxg5 Qxg5 50.Rxg5 Kf6 51.Rg3 Bf5 52.Rc3 Re2 53.g3 Be4 54.c5 Bc6 55.b4 Ke5 56.Ka3 Kd4 57.Kb3 Rg2

Jul-15-17  SpamIAm: <offramp>, I briefly considered that also in the hope that an en passant capture would be the winning move, which is rare. Unfortunately, this would've required that Black's last move was 24...g7-g5, which would've meant that Mr. Snape had turned down the opportunity to win White's queen scot-free with 24...gh. Pity.
Jul-15-17  RandomVisitor: The computer main line after 25.d7 is presented below, where after an exchange of pieces leaves white a pawn up, he must still play out and win a rook and pawn ending:


click for larger view

Stockfish_17061704_x64_modern: <49 minutes computer time>

<+2.99/55 25...Qxd7 26.Qxg5+ Kf8 27.Qf6 Qg4 28.d6 Re6 29.Qh8+ Qg8 30.Qxg8+ Kxg8 31.d7 Rd6 32.Rxe2 Rxd7> 33.c4 Kg7 34.Kc2 Kf6 35.Rd2 Rc7 36.Kd3 Ke5 37.Ke3 Rc5 38.g4 Ra5 39.Rc2 Rc5 40.Rf2 Ke6 41.Kd4 Rg5 42.Rf4 Kd6 43.h6 Ke6 44.c5 Rg6 45.c6 Kd6 46.c7 Kxc7 47.Rxf7+ Kb6 48.Rxh7 Rxg4+ 49.Kd5 Rg3 50.Rh8 Rg5+ 51.Kd6 Rh5 52.h7 Rh6+ 53.Kd5 Kb7 54.Ke5 Rh4 55.Kf5 Rh2 56.Kf6 Rf2+ 57.Kg5 Rg2+ 58.Kh6 Rh2+ 59.Kg7 Rg2+ 60.Kf7 Rh2 61.Kg6 Rg2+ 62.Kh5 Rh2+ 63.Kg4 Rh6 64.Kg5 Rh2 65.Kf4 Rh5 66.Ke4 Rh2 67.Kf5 Rh6

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: < SpamIAm: <offramp>, I briefly considered that also in the hope that an en passant capture would be the winning move, which is rare. Unfortunately, this would've required that Black's last move was 24...g7-g5, which would've meant that Mr. Snape had turned down the opportunity to win White's queen scot-free with 24...gh. Pity.>

LOL. That is brilliant! At least we both had a lateral idea - as garbage as it was, reversallywise.

Jul-15-17  Walter Glattke: To patzer 2: the g-pawn better stays behind, see: 30.-Kd8 31.kd2 Kc7 32.Ke3 Kxc6 33.Ke4 Kd6 34.Kf5 but now other: 34.-Kd5 35.Kxg5 Ke4 36.Kf6 Kf4 37.h5 Kg4 difficult then.
Jul-15-17  clement41: Very nice combination.

27 Rxe5! with the same pattern (back rank threat, unavoidable) as in Kasparov vs Huebner, 1986

29 Kd2 rightly improves the position while black cannot do likewise, so as to enter a pawn ending in a more comfortable position for white (with a more active King, and this will be crushing).

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Give gills nadger ease vine act dabble d7s deckhand crave hark e5s eggers by it to essay 25...Re4 cage evade vet 1 2 alive act enact c6s caveman back b5s braves by it to eggers 26...Re7 cio man eggshead vet 1 2 alive at enact e5s essays c6s creakas lanky c6s craveas f8s flashheld by it to danglearm 29.Kd2 appa dab by it to gradegives 29.g4 appa glean vet 1 2 alive act enact by it to eggsheads 29.Re4 appa evade vet 1 2 alive act enact it to by feetvests 29...f5 deuce framer by it to flavhands 29...f6 decree flasher vet 1 alive act enact cor 30.Rxf5+ about finish chord 30...Kg7 deo meo gangways 6 act enact wangle cor 30...Ke7 deo meo eggshead it 2 acts ave aid enact wangle carry the day ave nadger d7s deathram riven throws flash flesh pbs kid ages cat its waz win rum mury v y it's vasts o hup win you it's vasts vivas hip won y his now yup pun yow phi v nus yow how i puny why i v upon won yup d7s deckhand vis chav nadger d7s deckhand flash flesh hip pbs beck kia i akin ages egs gestate gets case cat tawny its waz win u rum move v y it's vast viva chav by it to egger 25.d7 Re5 cage essays i vet jab jack jade jaffa jag jaja jam jangle jap jar vint java jay man d7s diligent danglers dabbleat deckhand gadfly fang fade deaf glad daffy deffy geld gaff fladgel dang mack accent mace game cad deck cradle by it to egger 25...Re4 cage evade vet 1 2 alive act enact by it to creaks 26.Qc6 Bb5 cios breaks vets ave by it to eggers 26...Re7 v cio man eggshead vet 1 2 alive act enact by it to essayus 27.Rxe5 Bxc6 28.dxc6 Kf8 29.Kd2 appa dab vet by it to gladegive 29.g4 appa glean vet 1 2 alive act enact by it to eggsheads 29.Re4 appa evade vet 1 2 alive act enact by it to feelhaves 29...f5 deuce framer by it to flavhands 29...f6 decree flasher vet 1 alive act enact cor 30.Rxf5+ about finish chord 30...Kg7 deo meo gangways 6 act enact wangle cor 30...Ke7 deo meo eggshead it 2 acts ave aid enact wangle carry the day ave nadger d7s danglers ill raw his war history has harrow hes hawthorne vis its waz win rum ave ins hangs naf fan far vint reenter vis wads rant rage garage flay balance lad dane bat bet bent tab bantam belt brash vam betcha cab back crab vam clear bleak clack cell ill call hovels nadger d7s danglers;
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has two pawns for a bishop.

Black threatens f6.

White has 25.d7 and 25.Kd2. The latter is met with 25... Bb5.

In the case of 25.d7 to try and divert the black queen from g5:

A) 25... Qxd7 26.Qxg5+

A.1) 26... Kh8 27.Qf6+ Kg8 28.h6 Qg4 29.Rxe2 Rc8 (29... Qxe2 30.Qg7#; 29... Rxg2 30.Qd8+ Re8 31.Qxe8#) 30.Re7 + - [2P].

A.2) 26... Kf8 27.h6 (threatens Qg7+ and Rxe2+; 27.Kd2 Qe8 28.Qg7+ Ke7 29.Rxe2 Rxe2+ 30.Kxe2 Qb5+ and 31... Qxd5 unclear)

A.2.a) 27... Re7 28.Qg7+ Ke8 29.Qg8#.

A.2.b) 27... Re4 28.Kd2 Qe8 (28... Qe7 29.Qxe7+ followed by 30.Rxe2 with a won ending) 29.d6

A.2.b.i) 29... Rd4+ 30.Kc1 Rxd6 31.Qg7+ Ke7 32.Rxe2+ wins.

A.2.b.ii) 29... Qd7 30.Qg7+ Ke8 31.Qg8#.

A.2.b.iii) 29... Qc6 30.Qg7+ Ke8 31.Qg8+ Kd7 32.Qxf7+ Kxd6 33.Qf6+ Re6 34.Qd8+ followed by Rxe2 looks advantageous for White but not winning.

A.2.b.iv) 29... Qb5 30.Qxb5 Bxb5 31.Rxe4 wins.

B) 25... Re4(5) 26.Qc6 and the threat Qc8 looks winning.

Jul-15-17  Iwer Sonsch: 25.d7 was too obvious for a Saturday, and even too obvious for an exclam. If even I can solve it...

White wants to play Qxg5+, or at least free the Queen. 25.d7 Qxd7?! 26.Qxg5+ Kf8 grants at least a perpetual, probably even more after 27.h6.

25.d7 Re3-5 allows 26.Qd6, attacking b4.

No better moves to invent. Rxe2? is pointless.

Jul-15-17  Iwer Sonsch: Well, that queen sac was... less obvious. Maybe this should have been the puzzle move?
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Walter Glatke> I assume you're looking at the position after 29. Re8+ Qxe8 30. dxe8(Q)+ Kxe8 31. g4 Kd8 32. Kd2 Kc7 33. Ke3 Kxc6 34. Ke4 Kd6 35. Kf5 (diagram below)


click for larger view

when 35...Kd5 36. Kxg5 Ke4 (diagram below)


click for larger view

loses to 37. Kf6 Kf4 38. Kxf7 Kxg4 39. h6 Kf5 (diagram below)


click for larger view

40. Kg7 (mate-in-17, Stockfish 8 @ 43 depth.)

Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: Very difficult to turn down.
Jul-15-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: I suspect the reason for this being a Saturday puzzle is the difficulty of finding the forcing moves in <Random Visitor>'s main line <25. d7 Qxd7 26. Qxg5+ Kf8 27. Qf6 Qg4 28. d6 Re6 29. Qh8+ Qg8 30. Qxg8+ Kxg8 31. d7 Rd6 32. Rxe2+ Rxd7 33. c4> +2.10 @ 35 depth, Stockfish 8 (diagram below)


click for larger view

Continuing this line with a long move-by-move analsis on Stockfish 8 results in a win for Black after 33...Kf8 34.Rd2 Re7 35.Rd8+ Kg7 36.Kd2 Kf6 37.Kd3 Re1 38.Rh8 Rd1+ 39.Ke4 Rg1 40.c5 Rxg2 41.c6 Rc2 42.Kd5 Rd2+ 43.Kc5 Rc2+ 44.Kb5 Ke6 45.Re8+ Kd6 46.Rd8+ Ke6 47.h6 f5 48.Rd7 f4 49.Rxh7 f3 50.Rxa7 Rh2 51.c7 Kd7 52.Kb6 Rxh6+ 53.Kb7 Rc6 54.Kb8 Kd6 55.c8=Q Rxc8+ 56.Kxc8 (mate-in-19, Stockfish 8 @ 65 depth)

Jul-17-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I didn't see this puzzle but the ending would not be easy in practice. Better to have a much clearer advantage. Theoretically won endings have a habit of turning into draws or losses for me.

"All end games are drawn, and many winning ones are lost." J C Hegland.

(Well known cynic, wit, and coffee house chess genius c.1788)

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