chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing


register now - it's free!
Yifan Hou vs Koneru Humpy
Hou - Koneru Women's World Championship (2011)  ·  Spanish Game: Closed Variations. General (C92)  ·  1-0
To move:
Last move:

explore this opening
find similar games 34 more Yifan Hou/Koneru games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Chess Viewer Deluxe is our default Java viewer, but we offer other choices as well. You can use a different Java viewer by selecting it from the pulldown menu below and pressing the "Set" button.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with the default chess viewer, please see the Pgn4web Quickstart Guide.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: Rook + f Pawn + h Pawn versus Rook is a theoretical draw but requires real technique to hold. In that event, Black should keep playing for the draw.

Connected passed Pawns is an easy win.

Nov-23-11  Marmot PFL: He played it out far past this, almost to mate. It was obvious to the audience that the other player knew what to do. Browne said he should have realized this and resigned, the other player said no problem (he probably enjoyed beating a famous GM on stage, and wanted it to last).
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  fm avari viraf: Time to say Good-night & Good-bye to the World Title.
Nov-23-11  knighterrant999: Milky, milky cocoa puffs.
Nov-23-11  Redsoul: <tpstar> but isn't the f pawn, is the g pawn...
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Give it up already.

No one respects someone playing this out.

Just resign, shake hands and go have some curry.

Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: ^^Is that avatar fearless leader Kim Il Jung, or the guy from "Super Bad"?
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: There's still some hope for a perpetual....
Nov-23-11  Marmot PFL: A blunder here is 83 Rb6? then Ra3+ and the king can't escape checks without losing material.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: all right, bring out the Rook, a little soft shoe, please.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  parmetd: His avatar is edmund munch's the scream... rather famous painting...
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: white's rook is on the right file. Yifan can move her King one square to the left, and block checks with the Rook, but still get back in time to defend the g pawn if the black king advances forwards.

Shepherd the pawns, block the checks, block and shepherd.

Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: No, no, the chunky fellow with the glasses, three posts up. It looks like Kim Il Jung, "Glorious Leader" of North Korea.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <Redsoul> Right. This particular endgame is an easy win.

<HeMateMe> Come on, man. He is his avatar.

Nov-23-11  Marmot PFL: Kim Il's hobby is composing opera, though of course he could master chess quickly if so inclined.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Oh, thats right. He's one of three people in the worker's paradise with internet. There was a feature in People magazine about that.
Nov-23-11  Ulhumbrus: Lasker's way of handling these pawns may have been to push the h pawn before the g pawn. Thus after 97 Kg5 White plays h7 first and not g7.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Administrator: Thanks to everyone for watching and commenting on today's games. Our next live broadcast will be the 8th round of the Tal Memorial starting tomorrow morning at 6:AM USA/Eastern time. Hope to see you then.
Nov-23-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: Final position from Lasker-Tarrasch 1908, game 7:


click for larger view

Now that's bitter-endism.

Nov-23-11  HectorChess: Instead of 27..h5, why not 27..Kg7 and then 28..h5 to avoid Qh6?
Nov-23-11  Ezzy: Hou,Yifan (2578) - Koneru,Humpy (2600) [C92]
Women's World Chess Championship 2011 Tirana/Albania (7), 23.11.2011

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.00 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 00 9.h3 Qd7 10.d4 Re8 11.Nbd2 Bf8 12.a3 Bb7 13.d5 Ne7 14.Nf1 Ng6 15.N3h2< Novelty. 15 Bc2 has been played before >15...c6 16.Bg5 Be7 <Threatening 17..Nxd5 >17.dxc6 Bxc6 18.Ng3 Nf4 19.Bxf6 Bxf6 20.Nh5 Qe7 21.Qf3 Bg5 22.Rad1 Ne6 23.Ng4 Rf8 24.Ne3 <Threatening 25 Nf5 winning. Also white need not fear something like 24 Ba2 f5 because white has the strong 25 Qd3! fxg4 26 Qxd6 Qxd6 27 Rxd6 hitting both bishop and knight.> 24...Bxe3 25.Qxe3 Rad8 26.Ng3< White now has ideas of 27 Qb6 Qb7 28 Qxb7 Bxb7 29 Nf5 and the black d6 pawn is doomed. >26...g6< It was so important to stop 27 Nf5.> 27.Rd2 h5?!< With the white queen going to h6 and the white bishop on b3, there are always Qxg6 tactics available.> 28.Qh6 28...Nf4 29.Ne2 <Threatening 30 Nxf4 exf4 31 Qxg6+ winning. This was the problem with 27...h5> 29...Qf6?! <29...Ne6 had to be played. The thing is, is that white then plays 30 Ng3 and if Humpy doesn't repeat with 30...Nf4, then Yifan will still hold the advantage. Humpy now loses her f4 pawn. Again Hou Yifan ambushes Koneru in time trouble. I think Koneru missed 31 Rd3.> 30.Nxf4 exf4 31.Rd3 <This is what Koneru missed, and as in the last game she falls apart approaching the time control. >31...Rfe8 32.Rf3 <The pressure on f7 gives Yifan the advantage in all variations.> 32...Rd7< 32...Rxe4 doesn't work. The pressure on f7 is too much. [32...Rxe4 33.Rxe4 Bxe4 34.Rxf4 Bf5 (34...Qe7 35.Bxf7+) 35.g4] >33.Rxf4 Qg7< Only move> 34.Qg5 <Threatening 35 Rf6 and 36 Qxg6. Again the weakness of g6 due to 27...h5> 34...Re5 35.Qg3 Rde7 36.Rd1 g5 37.Rf5 Bxe4 <37...Rxf5 38.exf5 Re5 39.f3 d5 40.Qf2 Qf6 41.Bc2 Kg7 42.f4 gxf4 43.Qxf4 Bd7 44.Bd3 Kf8 45.Kh2 Ke8 46.g3 Qe7 47.Rf1 Re3 48.Rf3 Rxf3 49.Qxf3 Qg5 And black's game is still very difficult.] >38.Rxe5 Qxe5 39.Rxd6 Qxg3 40.fxg3 Bb7? <Black doesn't need to protect the pawn. [40...Kg7 41.Rxa6 Rd7 And black infiltrates into d2 with the rook.]> 41.Kf2< Also very strong is 41 Bd1 >41...Kg7 42.Bd1 h4 43.gxh4 gxh4 44.Rd4 Be4 45.Bf3 Bxf3 46.Kxf3 Re1 47.Rxh4 <This is a technical win for 99.9% of Grandmasters..> 47...Rb1 48.Rb4 Kf6 49.Ke3 Ke5 50.Re4+ Kd5 51.Rd4+ Ke5 52.Rd2 f5 53.Kd3 Kf4 54.Rf2+ Kg3 55.Rxf5< This is a technical win for 100% of Grandmasters.> 55...Rxb2 56.Rg5+ Kh4 57.Rg6 a5 58.Rg4+ Kh5 59.Re4 Kg6 60.Re2 Rb3 61.Ra2 b4 62.axb4 axb4 63.Rc2 Ra3 64.Kd4 bxc3 65.Rxc3 Ra2 66.Rg3+< Humpy's just hoping for a miracle here.> 66...Kh5 67.Ke3 Ra3+ 68.Kf2 Ra2+ 69.Kg1 Ra1+ 70.Kh2 Ra2 71.Rd3 Ra5 72.Rd4 Rb5 73.h4 Rb3 74.g3 Rb1 75.Kh3 Rh1+ 76.Kg2 Ra1 77.Rd5+ Kh6 78.Kh3 Ra3 79.Re5 Ra4 80.Re3 Ra6 81.g4 Ra1 82.Re6+ Kg7 <And so it continued until Yifan had pawns on g6 and h6 when Humpy had then had enough.> 1-0 on move 92.

So it seems almost inevitable that Hou Yifan will retain her World Championship title. She's a class act and the challenger Humpy Koneru was never really in the match. A bit of pressure in the first 2 games, but nothing Yifan couldn't deal with.

As tactics started to appear approaching the time control when both players were short on time, Yifan out-calculated and out-maneuvered Humpy. The match isn't quite yet over, but I can't see Humpy winning the last 3 games. A great performance by Yifan and a worthy World Champion!

Nov-24-11  andrewjsacks: Let's hope there was time pressure--somehow. This ridiculously late resignation puts even Jude Acers to shame--if that is possible.
Nov-24-11  Ladolcevita: <andrewjsacks>
I think Koneru was just playing for a stalemate,which is understandable in this position...

Well,Hou's play has been almost impeccable so far,so I think she really deserves to be the winner here and retain her title.

Dec-14-11  Penguincw: Wow. A KRPP vs. KR is harder to win than I thought.
Jan-02-14  dumbgai: <Penguincw: Wow. A KRPP vs. KR is harder to win than I thought.>

Not really. It can take a lot of moves but white's play is very methodical. Humpy could have resigned 40 moves earlier.

Jump to page #    (enter # from 1 to 3)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
Spot an error? Please submit a correction slip and help us eliminate database mistakes!
This game is type: CLASSICAL (Disagree? Please submit a correction slip.)

Featured in the Following Game Collections [what is this?]
R+K+g_pawn+h_pawn vs. R+K
from Instructive Rook Endings by Akavall
Women's World Championship, 2011 Rd.7
from Selected Tournaments and Favorite Games (2011) a by partien
Insanity
by akatombo
Rgh:R
from 96 The Unbearable Lightness of rook endgames by whiteshark
Omnia mea mecum porto.
by hanwubai
Chess Network Videos
by Penguincw


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies