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Viswanathan Anand vs Boris Gelfand
Anand - Gelfand World Championship Match (2012), Moscow RUS, rd 1, May-11
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Modern Exchange Variation (D85)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 17 OF 17 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: Dual commentary video annotation with Chessexplained (soon to be IM titled) :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1cX...

Hope this is interesting

Cheers, K

May-11-12  Chilisteak: Should black really accept a draw? Black has the bishop pair and a passed pawn!
May-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: So, Anand deliberately played into a Gelfie specialty, the Yehuda, to send a message, that Boris can't hurt him? Interesting. In a short, 12 game match, I'm not sure if Gelfand is all that hurt. He may well have some other TNs waiting for Anand, in other openings. I'm sure B.G. doesn't have to play the Grunfeld each game with black.

Some people also thought that Gelf had the slightly better endgame, because of the passed a file pawn, but not enough to play for a win. I think drawing with black in game one of a match is also a bit of a confidence booster. Some advantage also goes to Gelfand, in this result.

May-11-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: "You do expect to be surprised, I was expecting something. I'd taken a look at it. It was difficult to expect. I can't recall a Gruenfeld of Boris before."

- Vishy Anand (on the choice of the Gruenfeld by Boris Gelfand)

http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessne...

May-11-12  Shams: <wordfunph> Not a very illuminating quote from the Champ, is it.
May-11-12  SetNoEscapeOn: There are echoes of Anand vs Gelfand, 2007 here. Anand went on to become world champion with +4 while Gelfand finished second.

As we now know that was merely the first great result in world championship related events for Boris, but he scored + 2 in Mexico...

May-11-12  crazybird: Seems that Anand hasn't prepared well for Gruenfeld, as he wasn't expecting this as the surprise.
May-11-12  NGambit: <SetNoEscapeOn: There are echoes of Anand vs Gelfand, 2007 here.> I doubt Anand would have been surprised at all with Gelfand's Petrov then. Now, however, if Anand did not expect Gelfand's Grunfeld then that probably means his preparation is a little thin there. That's a bit of a tricky thing for Anand in his next white game (Assuming he intends to play d4). Else, does he have anything special with e4 (against the Berlins and the Petrovs) or something else?
May-12-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <NGambit: <SetNoEscapeOn: There are echoes of Anand vs Gelfand, 2007 here.>

I doubt Anand would have been surprised at all with Gelfand's Petrov then.>

I think the main point of the comparison (I was thinking about it myself) isn't Anand being surprised at the opening, but rather Gelfand letting Anand off the hook in a position where he had some advantage and might have pressed on for the win.

May-12-12  WiseWizard: This could get fun.00 Anand one of the greatest black piece players of all time.
May-12-12  NGambit: <Eyal: <NGambit: <SetNoEscapeOn: There are echoes of Anand vs Gelfand, 2007 here.> I doubt Anand would have been surprised at all with Gelfand's Petrov then.> I think the main point of the comparison (I was thinking about it myself) isn't Anand being surprised at the opening, but rather Gelfand letting Anand off the hook in a position where he had some advantage and might have pressed on for the win.> Of course. I was just pointing out the difference. Anand's problems ended in that game as soon as Gelfand agreed to draw. But, here even after agreeing to the draw Gelfand has (seemingly) left Anand pondering on the problems I mentioned.
May-12-12  romni: Good result for Gelfand, drawing easily with black in first game.It's unfortunate for us spectators but sometimes in an important match GMs have to be pragmatic and 'creativity' is pushed out. I am sure things will warm up soon. Btw, Anand lost with the Gruenfeld as black in his first game against Topalov 2 years ago.
May-12-12  SetNoEscapeOn: That's true. Also, I think Vishy would have held this ending yesterday and the position was drawn. On the other hand, the draw agreement in Mexico was based on a hallucination by both players.
May-12-12  Hesam7: <<15. Bg5>

IM Malcolm Pain: <15. Bf4 Looked sharper if only because the best Black responses look a little risky even if they are OK. Now Gelfand has a clear path to safety or perhaps more 15. ... Rd7 16. Ne5 Rxd6 17. Qc2 O-O! 18. Nc4 Qxc3 19. Bxd6 exd6 20. Qxc3 Bxc3 21. Rc2 Bd4 22. Nxd6 Be6 Must be fine for Black>

GM Sergey Shipov: <Something of a surprise. I expected 15. Bf4 with the idea of 15. ... O-O 16. Ne5! and here Black can of course follow the advice of the computer and exchange the threatening white knight, but you'll agree that purely in human terms it's a shame to give up the dark-squared bishop. Therefore I paid attention to the flesh-and-blood variation 16. ... Qxc3 17. Rc2 Bxe5 18. Rxc3 Bxc3 19. Qc2 Bd4 20. dxe7 Rxe7 21. Bd6 Rfe8 22. Bxe7 Rxe7 - and... couldn't establish an evaluation of the ensuing position. The black pieces have solid posts and the king is well-guarded. Can White claim victory? I suggest, dear friends, that you resolve that question yourself as homework. Do your preparation, and tomorrow I'll check it...>

GM Arkadij Naiditsch: <Probably not the most ambitious move... 15. Bf4 would have put a couple of difficult decisions in front of Boris Gelfand.>>

During the live commentary <Stonehenge> provided a correspondence game in which 15. Bf4 was played:

15.Bf4 Rd7 16.Rd2 Bxc3 17.Rd3 exd6 18.Rxd6 Qd8 19.Rxd7 Qxd7 20.Qc2 Bd4 21.Nxd4 cxd4 22.Qc5 f6 23.Rd1 Kf7 24.Rxd4 Qb7 25.h3 Re8 26.Rb4 Qd7 27.Qc3 Re6 28.Rc4 g5 29.Bg3 Qe7 30.f3 h6 31.Kh2 Bb7 32.Qa5 Kg7 33.Rc1 Qd7 34.Qc5 Qe7 35.Qf5 Bc8 36.Qa5 Bb7 37.Rc2 Bc8 38.Qb6 Qd7 39.Qb4 Qe7 40.Qxe7+ Rxe7 41.Rxc6 Bb7 42.Rb6 Bc8 43.Bd6 Ra7 44.Bc5 Rf7 45.Bd4 a5 46.g4 a4 47.Kg3 Kg6 48.Bb2 h5 49.gxh5+ Kxh5 50.Bxf6 a3 51.Ba1 Ra7 52.Rc6 Bd7 53.Rd6 Bc8 54.Rd5 Kg6 55.h4 gxh4+ 56.Kxh4 Ra4 57.Rc5 Be6 58.Rc6 Kf7 59.Kg5 Ke7 60.Rb6 Ra5+ 61.Kf4 a2 62.Ke3 Ra3+ 63.Kf2 Rd3 [1/2-1/2] IM Dabija, Mircea (2401) - Bucsa, Ioan (2041)

More on 15. Bf4 later.

May-12-12  Hesam7: 15. Bf4


click for larger view

First I let my engine (Critter 1.4 run for more than 100 minutes) and here Black's top 10 moves from engine's point of view (evaluations at <depth 24>):

15. ... O-O (0.00)
15. ... Rd7 (0.19)
15. ... Qxc3 (0.60)
15. ... Qd8 (0.71)
15. ... Qa3 (0.99)
15. ... exd6 (1.12)
15. ... h5 (1.17)
15. ... h6 (1.20)
15. ... f6 (1.21)
15. ... Bxc3 (1.32)

The above numbers mean that we only need to look at the first two moves. And there are essentially 4 variations:

(A) 15. ... O-O 16. Ne5 Bxe5,
(B1) 15. ... Rd7 16. Rd2 exd6,
(B2) 15. ... Rd7 16. Rd2 Bxc3,
(B3) 15. ... Rd7 16. Rd2 Qxc3.

Shipov's variation is fun, but it does not really work for Black: 15. ... O-O 16. Ne5 Qxc3 17. Rc2 Bxe5 18. Rxc3 Bxc3 19. Qc2 Bd4 20. dxe7 Rxe7 21. Bd6 Rfe8 22. Bxe7 Rxe7 and here I would continue with: 23. Rb1 Kg7 (Rb8 was coming) 24. h4 h5 25. Rb8 Be6 26. Qd3:


click for larger view

It is not obvious whether Black can actually build a fortress or not.

May-13-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <<15.Bf4> Rd7 16.Rd2> is a critical line (Pein obviously makes life much too easy for himself by dismissing 15.Bf4 on account of 15...Rd7 16.Ne5?):


click for larger view

16...exd6 17.Rxd6 Qd8 18.Rxd7 Qxd7 19.Bd6 Bf8 20.e5 (or 20.Be5 Qxd1 21.Rxd1 Rg8) 20...Be7 followed by ...0-0; White has compensation for the pawn but I doubt if there's more.

17.Bxd6 Bxc3 18.Rc2 (18.Rd3 c4! 19.Re3 Qa1!) 18...Bf6 19.e5 Be7 20.Qc1! 0-0 (before the white queen comes to h6) 21.Bxe7 Rxe7 22.Rxc5 (Black has enough defensive resources after 22.Qh6 Bf5 23.Ng5 f6 24.exf6 Rxf6 25.Re2 Qd8) 22...Qb4 23.Rc4 Qb7 24.Qh6 f5 - "equal, but White's position may be easier to play" (this line is given by Dennis Monokroussos).

May-13-12  solskytz: Funny thing, that in such a short game both players resorted to the same rare device of playing Rook to Knight's two, protected by a Bishop at Bishop's one, in order to menace the adversary's major piece.
May-13-12  izimbra: first search: "q=Gruenfeld+for+white";

second link: http://www.chesscorner.com/tutorial...

result: way better than Anand's team came up with...

May-14-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kingscrusher: <izimbra> Hahaha - I wonder who wrote that a few years back :)
May-14-12  Albertan: Great analysis of this game is in video format at Youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFs4...

May-16-12  Hesam7: <Eyal: <<15.Bf4> Rd7 16.Rd2> is a critical line (Pein obviously makes life much too easy for himself by dismissing 15.Bf4 on account of 15...Rd7 16.Ne5?):

16...exd6 17.Rxd6 Qd8 18.Rxd7 Qxd7 19.Bd6 Bf8 20.e5 (or 20.Be5 Qxd1 21.Rxd1 Rg8) 20...Be7 followed by ...0-0; White has compensation for the pawn but I doubt if there's more.

17.Bxd6 Bxc3 18.Rc2 (18.Rd3 c4! 19.Re3 Qa1!) 18...Bf6 19.e5 Be7 20.Qc1! 0-0 (before the white queen comes to h6) 21.Bxe7 Rxe7 22.Rxc5 (Black has enough defensive resources after 22.Qh6 Bf5 23.Ng5 f6 24.exf6 Rxf6 25.Re2 Qd8) 22...Qb4 23.Rc4 Qb7 24.Qh6 f5 - "equal, but White's position may be easier to play" (this line is given by Dennis Monokroussos).>

So this would be line (B1). My suggestion for White would be the following: 15. Bf4 Rd7 16. Rd2 exd6 17. Bxd6 Bxc3 <18. Re2> Bf6 19. e5 Be7 20. Nd2 O-O 21. Ne4:


click for larger view

Now 21. ... f5 kicks off a long forced sequence of moves: 22. exf6 Bxd6 23. Nxd6 Qc3 24. Rfe1 Qxf6 25. Qb3+ c4 26. Qxc4+ Kh8


click for larger view

Now White can go for either 27. Nxc8 or 27. Ne4.

May-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Not much here!
May-25-12  Chess Network: I created a YouTube video of this game.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkqr...

Jun-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Stonehenge: Here's that Dabija-Bucsa game:

Mircea Dabija vs Ioan Bucsa, 2010

Oct-26-12  Naniwazu: According to the Danish grandmaster Peter Heine Nielsen 8. Bb5+ is one of Jan Gustafsson's specialities which Anand's team (of which PHN was a member) borrowed for this game.
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