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Viswanathan Anand vs Boris Gelfand
Anand - Gelfand World Championship Match (2012), Moscow RUS, rd 3, May-14
Neo-Grünfeld Defense: Goglidze Attack (D70)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 26 OF 26 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-15-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  wordfunph: Game 3 Anand-Gelfand 2012 World Championship Match:

At the press conference, Gelfand was asked why he gets up so many times and goes away. His answer was: "Because behind the stage there are such great cookies."

Source: GM Arkadij Naiditsch chessbomb's annotation

May-15-12  visayanbraindoctor: So analysis shows that there is a strong probable White win with 34. d7.

My take on this is that Anand saw this move, analyzed it extensively in his mind's eye within the allowable time limit and in time pressure, and then decided to back out of it when he could not analyze it to the ends of its possible outcomes. Then he settled for a safe drawish move.

I think that the younger version of Anand would have played d7. But not this more careful, prudent, and older Anand, carrying on his back the Chess Title of the world.

May-15-12  MORPHYEUS: ... Or Anand's age is just catching up with him.
May-16-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: A good one:two rooks on the 7th vs a protected passed pawn.

But a stand-off regardless.

May-16-12  NGambit: <they should both be forced to play the Najdorf (or anything else razor sharp, Evans or Kings or Scotch Gambits) - very sharp variations!!>

I won't mind that. Not many would.

But Gelfand will surely do. (1) He figures (I'm guessing from the first two of his white games) that his best chance of winning the match is by grinding down a small plus in lifeless positions where only he can win. That seems to be his general match strategy with white.

(2) With black he seems to have tried to catch Anand off guard in the sharp Grunfeld but it almost boomeranged in Game 3. I doubt if will continue with the same black strategy. Which again supports thesis (1).

May-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < wordfunph: Game 3 Anand-Gelfand 2012 World Championship Match:

At the press conference, Gelfand was asked why he gets up so many times and goes away. His answer was: "Because behind the stage there are such great cookies." >

Cooked by Anand's wife? So it's Cook Gate that is developing! Or is it Cookie Gate?

May-17-12  LIFE Master AJ: http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

I don't think there is a win, an FM sent me some analysis, looks like Black can hold ... (maybe) Pawn down, but he says its a theoretical draw.

The above article has analysis by IM Pein, plus 2-3 vid's on the game as well.

May-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <an FM sent me some analysis, looks like Black can hold ... >

I'd be very curious to know how Black can hold after 34.d7. On pp.22-24 of this forum there are some detailed analyses of what seem like forced wins for White after 34...Rcc2 (which got most immediate attention), 34...Rd1+ (by a king walk to d8[!] - this possibility is also mentioned by Danny King in his video), as well as the ingenious 34...Rc5, which I haven't seen mentioned anywhere else (a line leading to a rook endgame where White is 2 pawns up).

May-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <Eyal> you might not find it so curious, however, to learn that <an FM sent me some analysis> is yet another of a seemingly endless series of pathetic outright lies.

By now, almost superfluous to point out that the "analysis" from this imaginary email wasn't actually posted eh?

In High School I saw a student actually say "Well I know Cat Stevens personally, and he told me that <Wild World> is about a girlfriend, not a daughter."

Gales of laughter ensued, teacher and students helpless with mirth in the face of such an infantile public lie.

You'd think a High School student would know better, let alone a grown man.

May-17-12  King Death: <jessicafischerqueen: you might not find it so curious, however, to learn that <an FM sent me some analysis> is yet another of a seemingly endless series of pathetic outright lies...>

Come on, <AJ's> pipeline to the greats is well known! They rush to Pensacola to have their analyses verified by the GOAT.

<...By now, almost superfluous to point out that the "analysis" from this imaginary email wasn't actually posted eh...>

It never is, he claims that he wouldn't want to reveal it. He didn't have any problem ratting on CG the day he got a week's vacation from here though. I had imaginary play mates as a child but at 54 he still thinks he's in childhood or something.

<...You'd think a High School student would know better, let alone a grown man.>

Maybe but we got a special case here.

May-17-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <King Death> Yep, nice to see your pleasing "green post" as always, since I have you on favorites due to the quality of your chess history contributions.

I was conflicted about posting this on a Historical Game page given how much of a stink I raised about that earlier this year.

However, there's a big difference between a mistake and a lie with regard to information on game pages.

Anyone can post a mistaken bit of analysis or history on a game page, obviously nothing wrong with that.

However, outright, deliberate lying about chess analysis or chess history on a games page is just as obscene as spamming it with <AJ war> crud.

An outright lie on a game page should be challenged for the sake of chess history.

In this case, to be a normal person, all <AJ> would have to do is post the "analysis he received" and let <Eyal> and the other members take a crack at it.

However, this analysis doesn't exist, as all CG.com regulars know.

However, the vast majority of people who click on these game pages have no idea whatsoever who <AJ> is. So his lies should not be left unchallenged in this context.

May-17-12  MORPHYEUS: FM is not a big deal. If he said it was from an IM or a GM, well...
May-17-12  Shams: <In High School I saw a student actually say "Well I know Cat Stevens personally, and he told me that <Wild World> is about a girlfriend, not a daughter."

Gales of laughter ensued, teacher and students helpless with mirth in the face of such an infantile public lie.>

I agree; there's no way Stevens would commit the intentional fallacy like that.

May-18-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <an FM sent me some analysis>

Insanity is self replicating, self perpetuating and always perfectly sane to those lost within.

May-19-12  erniecohen: <<LIFE Master AJ>: http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail... I don't think there is a win>

<Eyal>, the analysis he's talking about is the 35. ♖c4 line, not the King's walk line.

<AJ>, as mentioned a page or so back, the line posted on the tournament website ("But black defends with...") has White blundering with 41. ♖xh5?. We analyzed 41. ♖x♖ as a win for White about 1 page back. <AJ>, if your analysis deals with the 41. ♖x♖ line and claims it's a draw (or if gives some earlier drawing line for Black), please post the relevant lines.

<jessicafischerqueen>, <King Death>, <whiteshark>: while <AJ> should quote specific lines or positions (or at least check that his citations address the analysis that is posted in this forum), it just makes things worse to counter such "evidence" with ad hominym attacks. Please, let's keep things civil and stick to the game.

May-19-12  MORPHYEUS: so trivial. they have to go make a mountain out of it.
May-23-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <On pp.22-24 of this forum there are some detailed analyses of what seem like forced wins for White after 34.d7 [...] [including] the ingenious 34...Rc5, which I haven't seen mentioned anywhere else (a line leading to a rook endgame where White is 2 pawns up).>

I now see that Shipov actually analyzed this line, not in his live comments but in the more elaborate ones he does after the games - these can be found in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnwD... or http://www.crestbook.com/files/AnGe... (chessbase format); even if you don't understand the Russian you can see the variations. Anyway, his analysis and conclusions are essentially identical to those posted here on p.23 (the moves given in the resulting rook endgame are not all exactly the same, but all the basic ideas are).

May-25-12  Chess Network: I've created a YouTube video of this game.

http://youtu.be/o0GTGUspw2s

May-26-12  Karaokcu: i think that Gelfand may play 8... f5!? aganist 8.Qd2 , it is a bit risky and doubtful i agree , but it gives some winning chances to black , things will be sharpened at the later stage of the struggle.
May-26-12  Howard: If you look at a recently-posted article called Chess Evolution, which is on the ChessCafe website, you will see some analysis arguing that Anand should have won the third game. He should have played "pawn to d7" around the 33rd move.

Any comments ! Bring 'em on !

May-26-12  MORPHYEUS: Yes, Anand missed the win.
Jun-02-12  lost in space: One of the few games in the WC match with classical time control not only playing on safety
Jun-11-12  erniecohen: <<Eyal> I now see that Shipov actually analyzed this line, not in his live comments but in the more elaborate ones he does after the games - these can be found in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnwD... or http://www.crestbook.com/files/AnGe... (chessbase format); even if you don't understand the Russian you can see the variations. Anyway, his analysis and conclusions are essentially identical to those posted here on p.23 (the moves given in the resulting rook endgame are not all exactly the same, but all the basic ideas are). >

I don't speak Russian, but his analysis doesn't seem to add up. After 34. d7, he gives 34...♖c5 an exclamation mark, even though it loses according to his analysis. Meanwhile, after 34...♖cc2, White seems to have nothing better than 35. ♖c4 ♖xc4 36. bxc4 h5 37. ♔c1 ♖d4 38. ♔c2 ♔f6 39. ♖h7 ♔g6 40. ♔c3 ♖d1 41. d8♕ ♖xd8 42. ♖xb7:


click for larger view

Shipov gives White only a slight edge, so his annotation of move 34 doesn't make much sense.

In any case, this is the critical position. If White can convert, then I think 34. d7 was a win, but I'm not so sure about this position; Malcolm Pein said this was the line he had thought could draw for Black, as opposed to the faulty one that he posted on the game report. Rook ending experts should feel free to comment.

Jun-12-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <erniecohen> In this post of mine that you're quoting I was referring only to the analysis of the 34...Rc5 idea, since in a previous post I said that I haven't seen it mentioned outside this forum, and as far as the analysis of that line goes Shipov is completely correct. I suppose he gives the exclamation mark to Black's move because it's a creative resource. It's true that if you look at the analysis of the 34th move as a whole, there's an inconsistency in presenting Rcc2 as a sideline with "only" a clear advantage (not a "slight edge") to White at the end.

At any rate, playing out a bit the diagram position with the help of Houdini, I'm quite convinced that it's winning for White.


click for larger view

Basically, Black's Q-side is too weak: White's strong passer and the weakness of the a-pawn are too much to handle, especially with the black king on the other side of the board. For example: 42...Kf6 43.Rb2! (43.Ra7? Rg8 followed by Rxg2 and Black might get too much counterplay) 43...Rc8 44.Re2! (not 44.Kd4 immediately because after 44...Rd8+ 45.Kc5 Rc8+ the king can't cross over to the b-file, as the rook would be lost after Rb8+) followed by Kd4 & c5 with the white king invading, and there isn't much that Black can do.

Giving up the a-pawn immediately and going for counterplay on the K-side doesn't seem to help either, e.g. 42...Rc8 43.Ra7 Kg5 (43…Kf6 44.Ra6+! displacing the black king and only then taking on a5) 44.Rxa5 Kf4 45.Rb5 h4 46.a4 Kg3 47.Rb2 f4 48.a5 Ra8 49.Ra2 h3 50.gxh3 Kxf3 51.Kb4 Kg3 52.a6 f3 53.c5 f2 54.Rxf2! Kxf2 55.Kb5 and it's a tablebase win.

Apr-16-13  Hesam7: Black tries 21...Rd6?! and fails: N Vitiugov vs A Timofeev, 2013
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