chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Vladimir Kramnik vs Wang Hao
Dortmund Sparkassen (2013), Dortmund GER, rd 1, Jul-26
Slav Defense: Soultanbeieff Variation (D16)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 5 more Kramnik/Wang Hao games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
Jul-26-13  Karpova: Chess blindness: 26...Kh7 27.Qb1+ winning the rook.
Jul-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <25...Ra2??> Clearly a blunder. But was the game already an abstract win for White?
Jul-26-13  fgh: It seems that rooks should not always be placed behind passed pawns. ;-)

Anyway, if this game had been played in the 2013 Candidates and Grischuk had been black, the conspiracy theorists would have gone nuts.

Jul-26-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <fgh....Anyway, if this game had been played in the 2013 Candidates and Grischuk had been black, the conspiracy theorists would have gone nuts.>

To put it mildly.

Jul-26-13  Catfriend: <Gypsy> Doesn't seem so.

Apparently, by combining pressure on f2 and plain old blockade against the a-pawn, Black should probably hold it.

A possible line:

25..Qf5 (keeps looking at f2, attacks a5) 26. Qd4 Re2 (still minds f2, prepares to block) 27. Ra1 Re6

Now after the straightforward 28. a5, 28..Ra6 seems to hold.

More tenacious is the silicon suggestion: 28. Qb4 - but even then 28..Re2 reminds White of f2.

Maybe it is somehow a win - but if so, an extraordinary one.

I am a fan of Kramnik, but this one was certainly quite a gift.

Jul-26-13  Catfriend: <fgh> Ah, but it is well-known Chinese communism was born in Russia, so clearly Wang Hao takes the party line and supports the Russian guys.
Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

<fgh: It seems that rooks should not always be placed behind passed pawns. ;-)>

Not if they're <UNPROTECTED> => <LPDO>!

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

Game Collection: LPDO -> LOOSE PIECES DROP OFF! 25 ... Rb2-a2?? unpro rook drops off to queen fork 27 Qb8-b1+

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

Game Collection: KAPP - KEEP ALL PIECES PROTECTED (B. LARSEN) 25 ... Rb2-a2?? unpro rook drops off to queen fork 27 Qb8-b1+

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

Game Collection: LEFT BEHIND (DRAWBACK CHESS -- M. ASHLEY) 25 ... Rb2-a2?? leaves behind b8-checking sq for 26 Qa7-b8+ 1-0

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

Game Collection: LPDO -> LOOSE PIECES DROP OFF! (GM DR J. NUNN) 25 ... Rb2-a2?? unpro rook drops off to queen fork 27 Qb8-b1+

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013


click for larger view

25 ... ♖b2-a2?? <left behind: b8>


click for larger view

26 ♕a7-b8+! 1-0


click for larger view

(CONTINUATION)
26 ... ♔g8-h7 27 ♕b8-b1+ <fork: a2 & h7>


click for larger view

Like Dr. Nunn, <LPDO: LOOSE PIECES DROP OFF>!

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

22 ?


click for larger view

How should White meet the threat to Her Majesty, the White d2-queen?

22 ♖b7-d7 <<interpose: d8->d2@d7+d2,d1>


click for larger view

By <INTERPOSING>, of course!

Jul-26-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013

Game Collection: INTERPOSE TO DEFEND. DEFEND BY INTERPOSING. 22 Rb7-d7 shields/interposes the White d2-queen from d8-rook

Jul-26-13  EvanTheTerrible: Quite the blunder. Very strange for a 2750.
Jul-26-13  notyetagm: <EvanTheTerrible: Quite the blunder. Very strange for a 2750.>

Indeed. You don't get to 2750(!) playing moves like 25 ... ♖b2-a2??.

Jul-26-13  Marmot PFL: Only 7 original moves, the rest was Topalov vs V Gashimov, 2012
Jul-26-13  notyetagm: <Marmot PFL: Only 7 original moves, the rest was Topalov vs V Gashimov, 2012>

Damn, Wang Hao played only a *few* moves of his own before he played 25 ... ♖b2-a2??.

Jul-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: Nobody has dared try 10 ... Nxd4 yet Opening Explorer

Is there a tactical refutation, or just too risky?

Strong game by Kramnik.

Jul-27-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  PhilFeeley: <tpstar> Perhaps 12. Rd1 or Be3 harasses the queen too much (after the knight exchange on move 11), and white is even further ahead in development - especially with black's uncastled king.
Jul-27-13  Catfriend: Indeed, after 10..Nxd4 11. Nxd4 Qxd4, the queen is in a precarious position.

12. Nb5! Qd8 13. Bf4 wins material, as 13..0-0 14. Nc7 Rb8 is bad due to 15. Rad1 Bd7 16. Nxe6

An attempt to avoid this is 12..Qc5, but this doesn't save black: 13. Be3 Qe5 (Qc6 14. Rac1) 14. f4! Qb8 15. Bd4 with dominating position.

Yet another try is 12..Qb6, but the queen finds no respite there. 13. a5 Qd8 14. Bf4 and we're back at the main line winning Ra8.

Jul-27-13  Ulhumbrus: After 17 Nxg5 White's pieces are no less than four moves ahead in development. Kramnik converts this asset into a pawn and a win
Jul-27-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Wang Hao, 2013


click for larger view

17 ♘f3x♗g5


click for larger view

<Ulhumbrus: After 17 Nxg5 White's pieces are no less than four moves ahead in development. Kramnik converts this asset into a pawn and a win>

A *great* example of the <CONVERSION OF ONE TYPE OF ADVANTAGE INTO ANOTHER>.

Here Kramnik playing White transforms his advantage in <TIME (TEMPO)>, his <LEAD IN DEVELOPMENT>, into a <MATERIAL ADVANTAGE>, an extra pawn.

24 ♕d7xa7 <extra pawn>


click for larger view

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
25 ... Rb2-a2?? leaves behind b8-checking sq for 26 Qa7-b8+ 1-0
from LEFT BEHIND (DRAWBACK CHESS -- M. ASHLEY) by notyetagm
Big Blunder
from zz03_Heavy pieces in action: pure QRR middlegame by whiteshark
283
from Kramnik - My Life and Games by peckinpah
The QGD/Slav/Semi-Slav by Zhbugnoimt
by fredthebear
25 ... Rb2-a2?? unpro rook drops off to queen fork 27 Qb8-b1+
from KAPP - KEEP ALL PIECES PROTECTED (B. LARSEN) by notyetagm
Grandmaster Blunders
by alexmagnus
283
from Kramnik - My Life and Games by JoseTigranTalFischer
The QGD/Slav/Semi-Slav
by Zhbugnoimt
Wang Ho relied to get equality but .........+see at ICC
from Trendy Opening Lines quite handy ! part 1 by FLAWLESSWIN64
Masters blunder too!
by parmetd
25 ... Rb2-a2?? unpro rook drops off to queen fork 27 Qb8-b1+
from A. TACTICS. LOOSE. by PinkLedDoor
283
from Kramnik - My Life and Games by jakaiden


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC