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Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen
Anand - Carlsen World Championship (2013), Chennai IND, rd 7, Nov-18
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense (C65)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 15 OF 15 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Kaspablanca>

Carlsen vs Wang Yue, 2010

Playing the King's Gambit in a world championship is another thing, though. This game thrilled a lot of people:

Kasparov vs Anand, 1995

But Kasparov didn't try the Evans in their subsequent match.

Nov-18-13  MarkFinan: I like Nakamura too, he's an exciting player. But keypusher's right about playing a KG in a WCC game. Just won't happen, there's too much at stake.

Nov-18-13  sevenseaman: Half measures?
Nov-18-13  MarkFinan: Sevensemen... I wanted to say this to you ages ago, and ask you if anyone else has ever told you too!

Whenever I look at your avatar I see the death star, half constructed!! It's probably just me, haha, but I really do like that avatar for star wars reasons. ;)

Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: I think this match has been decided already. In the remaining 5 games, Anand needs a +2 score but only has the white pieces 2 more times.
Nov-18-13  WiseWizard: Anand has the second highest score with the Black pieces of all time next to Kasparov, he has had better positions with black in this match anyway thanks to Carlsen's non forcing openings, I thought he knew very clearly not to enter endgames with a bad pawn structure against Carlsen, he will make you play perfect.
Nov-18-13  RookFile: Chess has come full circle. Guys like Lasker knew all about the Berlin defense and the open game. It seem like we should go back and study those games to get ideas. Fischer always used to study the games of the past.
Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < MarkFinan: <<Richard Taylor: < MarkFinan: Worst game so far. Very disappointed in Anand, when you have the white pieces you have to play for win. I'd rather go down swinging, because he's just waved the metaphorical white flag! > Absolutely! The King's Gambit - or something similar was screaming to be played. Carlsen would be in a panic. Or a 1. e4 e5 2. d4 ... make it unusual - take the risk - the only way to win the match for Anand.

Or the 2 d4 against a Sicilian if it had happened: weak stuff by Anand.>>

As much as I agree with you Richard, the days of Morphy and that kind of chess are long gone! I don't remember the last time I saw someone at the very highest level of chess play a kings gambit (oh yeah. Mrs Polgar I think?!? ) and I'd be willing to wager my own child it won't be played during this match!

Its over already and even Anand knows it. >

If you think about what Morphy was doing, he was playing positional chess; as all great players do. People are fooled because he in fact played int the time of the popularity of the KG. Now, many of his games went to endings.

I thin people forget that chess is not as "sophisticated" as it seems - so the days are NOT "long gone". What happens is that various openings come and go in fashion. There is nothing inherently wrong with the King's Gambit. Now Kasparov played the Evans. If he had regularly played gambits every one would. What is the Najdorf but a long drawn out insane Gambit? It is full of sacrifices and crazy play and the English Attack is the most popular opening.

Of course there is nothing wrong with the kind of chess played as no one can avoid these long complex "positional" games (all games are positional really): but it is now that Anand has to take risks, or create some inbalance. Other strategies will see him slowly die.

His forte - I have his book, the earlier version - is those complex or "random" situations: this doesn't mean he is gauche. He showed how to beat Topalov and Kramnik et al. It is now a question of how to break this "wall". It is no excuse the Berlin (which is fascinating opening) leads to a draw, as Anand has won games from positions much like those that have arisen.

There seems to me to be a psychological reason. It seems now that he has lost heart: and that happened to me when I knew that people were aware on here I was playing in the NZ Champs in 2011. That fact threw me. I played some extraordinary stupid moves, and sacrificed (once twice in a game even though I saw how I could win with only one sac, and had intended to play that but decided to do it "for the hell of it"), and this kind of thing continued, with unforced errors and blunders against players I could adn did beat either before or after.

Now the effect is that psychological thing - it is not really to do with ability as such: and after I had failed to win more than 1 game I think it was, and it went on, I started to lose hope and the worse my results the more disconsolate I got and the worse I played.

Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Now, I also think that Anand is almost too nice. He shouldn't share that room they have during the game with Carlsen. Kasparov never would. He knew that chess has nothing to do with being nice or helping children to develop it was all about Kasparov winning whatever the cost.

So, no shared room, no Mr Niceguy. But you can be polite etc - but you have to play in style that doesn't suit your opponent. I won a game recently against a younger player who is quite strong as I avoided the more sharp lines and he admitted he had expected me to go on the attack (as I had against him before) but the type of position was not his cup of tea and I slowly Carlsened him. Ok it takes a little skill but it is about not playing their game, not about how good you are as such.

Anand really fears losing so that fear cramps his ability to think well about his games.

Nov-18-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < keypusher: <Kaspablanca>

Carlsen vs Wang Yue, 2010

Playing the King's Gambit in a world championship is another thing, though. This game thrilled a lot of people:

Kasparov vs Anand, 1995

But Kasparov didn't try the Evans in their subsequent match. >

There you are! Carlsen played the KG - that proves there is nothing wrong with it!! And Kasparov played the Evans. Just the ticket! (That sort of thing).

<But Kasparov didn't try the Evans in their subsequent match.>

He was probably saving it for the right moment. He didn't need to play it.

Nov-18-13  geigermuller: At the press conference, Anand said he was trying to push as much as he could in this game, and admitted being unable to achieve anything. That is horrible news for Anand fans as well as chess fans. This IS his best chess.
Nov-18-13  WiseWizard: Anand is justified, though flawed, in playing safe as Carlsen is the type of blood thirsty killer who would try to win 5 straight to end the match and Anand definitely knows that this match can turn to a massacre but this in essence, is resigning the match. When Kramnik said Anand is scared of Carlsen I thought it was bs but it might be true, his body language in the game 4 press conference could be interpreted that way, I think that Rook endgame where Carlsen kept setting such devilish traps with Anand down to minutes on the clock did him in.

Anand's match strategy should have been avoid endgames at all cost and unless there is a clear initiative and attacking chances DO NOT, NEVER allow your pawn structure to be broken. As this is what creates the dynamic where there only 2 results, Carlsen win or draw and he can turn the endgame screw for hours as there is no way out. I'm just shocked Anand allowed these type of endgames. Bc7 in game 5 was appalling.

Nov-18-13  Hesam7: <csmath: To some degree yes. But you should check 10th round game with Morozevich and 11th round game with Adams. They do not look very peaceful to me.>

In Topalov - Morozevich their personal animosity was a factor, against Adams he was simply worse.

Anyway at the end of the first half of San Luis, Topalov was leading by 2 points (6 wins and one draw), in the second half he drew all his games, 7 draws with an average length of 32.57 moves, 4 of which lasted 24 moves or less.

Now halfway through a world championship match Carlsen is leading by two points, then he handily draws with Black pieces and people are outraged? Give me a break.

Nov-18-13  csmath: Kasparov's comment today on 17. Qxe3?!

<Garry Kasparov■@Kasparov6312h Can't say about next games but clear Anand didn't want to fight today. You take on e3 with the pawn if you want to play.>

Agree 100%. This fear from spoiling pawn structure prevented him from fighting today. After 18 moves the game was even and over with.

Nov-18-13  csmath: <Now halfway through a world championship match Carlsen is leading by two points, then he handily draws with Black pieces and people are outraged? Give me a break.>

I am not complaining, I already noted that aggressive play with pawns when Q+N battery is present is not a clever thing to do for either. Unless there is an obvious advantage I do not see what would be the gain for Carlsen to move his pawns nor for Anand to move his. Keeping standoff is the most prudent thing to do.

I cannot blaim Magnus for not conjuring something up when I cannot see anything myself. On the other hand Anand missed the boat earlier.

Nov-19-13  Hesam7: <csmath: Kasparov's comment today on 17. Qxe3?!

<Garry Kasparov■@Kasparov6312h Can't say about next games but clear Anand didn't want to fight today. You take on e3 with the pawn if you want to play.>

Agree 100%. This fear from spoiling pawn structure prevented him from fighting today. After 18 moves the game was even and over with.>

I did not watch the game live but looking at it later I thought 8 g4!? was the only way to question Black's opening set up and fight for a win. After 8...Bg6 9 Nb3 Bd6 (forced) 10 Na5! Bb4 11 Bd2 Ba5 (forced) 12 Ba5 Qd6 13 Qe2 Nd7 14 Nh4


click for larger view

White looks better due to his superior minor pieces ...

Nov-19-13  csmath: <White looks better due to his superior minor pieces ...>

Not really. White committed himself to 0-0-0 so black can safely do that. White won't get anything to exchange knight for lousy bishop with Nf5 (or worse Nxg6?). Both would end up with broken pawns.

But if he does not do that then what is his knight doing on the rim?

Kasparov proposal is the same I saw in the game which is to open f-file and open battle there. That promises the fight at least.

Nov-19-13  Hesam7: <csmath: <White looks better due to his superior minor pieces ...>

Not really. White committed himself to 0-0-0 so black can safely do that. White won't get anything to exchange knight for lousy bishop with Nf5 (or worse Nxg6?). Both would end up with broken pawns.

But if he does not do that then what is his knight doing on the rim?

Kasparov proposal is the same I saw in the game which is to open f-file and open battle there. That promises the fight at least.>

In case of Nf5, ...Bf5 is bad b/c White recaptures with the g-pawn and gets a free minority attack on the g-file. But you are right, taking the Bishop is bad for White. Finally 14 Nh4 prepares f4, which is White's main idea from the diagram I posted. Since defending an isolated e-pawn is a nearly an impossible task Black has to play ...ef4 after which White gets plenty of play.

Nov-19-13  csmath: <Finally 14 Nh4 prepares f4, which is White's main idea from the diagram I posted.>

Black will play standard

...c5 & ...0-0-0

and f4 will not be giving him problems:

14. ... c5
15. Bd2 [preparing f4 or Bg5] 0-0-0
16. 0-0-0 Kb8
17. f4 exf4
18. Qh2 c4
19. Bxf4 Qc6

and I still do not know what is knight doing on the rim other than looking for exchange.

Black has no any problems here.

Nov-19-13  MarkFinan: Richard Taylor.. I remember getting hammered on the black side of a 1.e4 c5 2.d4 exd 3.c3 and on one or two occasions after taking on c3 it being completely ignored gambiting 2 pawns!! That bishop on b2 can be lethal, especially against someone with hardly any experience like me. And I'm not too good with remembering names of openings, I just know how to play quite a few with the help of the opening book in stockfish. It'd be great to see something like that from Anand in his next game with white but I predict an e4 RL.

Can someone post up a link to today's press conference please?

Nov-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < MarkFinan: Richard Taylor.. I remember getting hammered on the black side of a 1.e4 c5 2.d4 exd 3.c3 and on one or two occasions after taking on c3 it being completely ignored gambiting 2 pawns!! That bishop on b2 can be lethal, especially against someone with hardly any experience like me. And I'm not too good with remembering names of openings, I just know how to play quite a few with the help of the opening book in stockfish. It'd be great to see something like that from Anand in his next game with white but I predict an e4 RL. >

They are stuck in "theory" which is great in normal situations. I have also been beaten by that 1. e4 c5 2. d4...

Say as Black Anand had said - well to hell with it - the only thing their team haven't prepared is 1. e4 Nf6...now you have a game. There is this: 2. e5 Ng8 (which I played in a simul vs. Spassky)...now that is all the theory I had prepared + I knew the ideas of counterattacking in such unbalanced positions. Korchnoi's favourite game was an Alekhine's by him. Now if the 2.Nc3 happens then d5!? 3. e5 d4 4. exf6 dxc3 5. fxg2 cxe2+ 6. Qxd2 Qxd2+ 7. Bxd2 Bxg7 and although it is theoretically better for White (slightly) if Anand knew it (it is a line that would follow) there are lots of ways for Black to attack from that position...and much of the Alekhines is still unknown and if they get out of theory it will favour Anand in this situation. He then has to think for himself and that pushes you. That gets the ideas going. Anand will "remember" his tactical genius. He will play like a fighter (like Tal or Fischer who rolled out a Sicilian against Spassky): look Kasparov has said that there are with say the exceptions of a few really silly things "no bad openings". I say this not because I want either side to win as I'm not playing but I am thinking what I would do. I would certainly not go down without a fight. I would just mix it even if it mean a loss.

Imagine he gets in the 2 d4 or 2f4 all the fans will be rapt. Tal would do it as he loved to play to an audience.

We've seen Anand play deep "normal" chess and a lot of complex games (the English variation of the Sicilian is only one): and Carlsen can do the sharp stuff. You have to goad him into pressing and then counter attacking. In the early games he was really nervous and didn't play well at all. Then in that game with the Bxa3 Anand got just the kind of position he wanted and Carlsen made errors. There were chances for Anand to win as there were in games 1 and 2.

But if he just draws the rest it will be sad ending. Larsen and Topalov would be on the attack come hell or high water even Ivanchuk would be lashing out.

When you think about it it was Botvinnik who attacked Tal and started teh fireworks in 1960 with a pawn sac with the Black side of a French.

Taking that further: it is not inconceivable that I was wrong (@@!!) and indeed he could come back, having studied Carlsen's play and win: jsut as Botvinnik did. Botvinnik played very spirited chess in 1962 to win so well Tal praised his play.

Another thing: if Carlsen himself uncorks a masterpiece (and he is a great player of course) Anand will applaud him as Spassky did when he lost that great game Fischer played when he targeted Spassky's isolated pawn couple: he actually stood up at the end a joined the huge applause, facing Fischer as if he was in the audience. When we saw him, he said of Fischer that he "loved Fischer"...so there was a recognition there that in a way Fischer had done him a favour and I think he understood Fischer's "madness"...lol}}

But if Anand plays strongly and sharply he will feel better even if he loses. He has nothing to lose and everything to gain. Carlsen is possibly the better player now, he is 22, but Anand is a bit psyched I think. So I understand his wanting to do damage control. We might see some fireworks after the rest day or it might be draws and then it is Carlsen's but Anand has achieved a huge amount so it will still be a good result.

Nov-20-13  MarkFinan: Richard.. That was a really enjoyable post to read, and the game against Spassky must be a great memory for you. I don't think Anand will come out of this with any credit at all unless he plays for a win. And I've seen that e4. Nf6 e5. Ng8 played once or twice before, but I don't think id have the nuts to play it against an ex world champion!
Jan-03-14  LIFE Master AJ: http://en.chessbase.com/post/chenna...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gJN...

Apr-09-14  joddon: anand was hoping to get some positional advantage.....long castle is his best hope, but magnus defends easily and well knowing exactly what anand has under his shirt...reason why magnus is top is cus his intuition is way ahead and that gives anand too little of a chance to surprise him.ha.....too bad....only way to get magnus is to bore him and make him tired....take a lot of time opening,changing rooks on the h file is a mere waste of power!!!!
May-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <csmath: <Although to be fair, Fischer may have done that against Spassky after he had built up a good lead.>

My recollection is different. Fischer did not coast, he kept playing rather aggressive in the second half of the match but it was Spassky that had found more balance.>

Agreed--Spassky put the challenger under considerable pressure from the notorious eleventh game on, the death knell for Fischer's beloved Najdorf Poisoned Pawn. In the end, Fischer showed his class as all champions have done.

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