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Shakhriyar Mamedyarov vs Peter Svidler
World Chess Championship Candidates (2014), Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, rd 6, Mar-19
Dutch Defense: Semi-Leningrad Variation (A81)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Given 8 times; par: 29 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Mar-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  WannaBe: <Richard Taylor> Can you post some lines to follow up with 31 Kf2
Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: This game proves that 1.e4 is a blunder! Because White didn't waste a tempo by moving the e-pawn, he saved a vital tempo for the attack later in the game.
Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  piltdown man: A beautiful final move.
Mar-20-14  talwnbe4: 31. Rg5 is a fine move that is just as good as 31. Kf2. .. but 27. Rfd1! piling on the d5-bishop was much stronger than 27. Bd4 ?
Mar-20-14  talwnbe4: In any case after 27. Bd4 Re6 28.Bf7+ simplifies to a clearly winning endgame, so 27. Bd4 still clearly wins.
Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <WannaBe: <Richard Taylor> Can you post some lines to follow up with 31 Kf2>

31. Kf2 Re4 32. Ba1 ... the point is that White keeps the R and wins quickly.

But if you use a good program you will see the lines. I ran Komodo for some time. But then I wiped it all off when I had clarified. I was wondering if Rg5 was actually a blunder but it wasn't but it was one of the weaker moves as it happens.

What he played was spectacular but the computer thinks it isn't very good.

But from a human point of view it worked as Svidler soon resigned. He was lost in the long run as was played. I didn't follow the whole game as they were concentrating on Anand and Aronian.

I didn't like Marmedyrarov's Ba3 early on and nor did the comp. - an occasion when I was in agreement with the computer.

I didn't see how he got to that awful position with a B on g6, but he must simply have blundered.

I use the computer as I get quite tired watching as it is after midnight usually when it ends, also on the live feed the boards they have are not in focus on my computer.

Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: <talwnbe4: 31. Rg5 is a fine move that is just as good as 31. Kf2. .. but 27. Rfd1! piling on the d5-bishop was much stronger than 27. Bd4 ?>

It is a fine move: but it is weaker than 31. Kf2 which is objectively the best move.

That said it still wins the game and I think Svidler took the point and decided to resign and get on with his next game after a rest.

It was a pity for him as he had done well before his h6 error losing the g pawn.

(Svidler's play involved dissolving White's pawn structure etc.

Mar-20-14  talwnbe4: Richard: 31. Rg5 hxg5
32. Bxe3 33. a4 Bf7 34. h6 g4 35. a5 Bc4 36. Kf2 Kf7 37. Ke1 Kg6 38. Kd1 Bb3+ 39. Kc1 Bc4 40. Kc2 Bxe2 41. Kxc3 c5 42. Kxc3 Kg6 43. Kd2 Bb5 44. Ke3 ba6 45. Bg5 Bb7 46. Kf4 2.41

This is why Svidler resigned after 31. Rg5

31. Kf2 c5 32. Bf6 Ra3 33. Rc7 Ra6 34. Bg7+ Kg8 35. g4 Rc6 36. Ra7 Rb6 37. Bc3 Be4 38. Rg7+ Kf8 39. g5 hxg5 40. Rxg5 Kf7 41. Rxc5 Rc6 42. Ra5 Re6 43. a3 Bc2 44. Rd5 Ke7 45. Bb4+ Kf7 2.20

using Fruit on Core 2 duo

Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: As a Dutch player I think Black's opening is overly ambitious. It's very dangerous to open the position and the middle so early when your position is undeveloped. This is especially true with the Dutch when your kingside pawns have been moved. It would be better IMO for Black to refrain from ..e5 so early and wait until his q-side is more developed. Waiting also means he can counter what White does more effectively and be more flexible with the pawn structure.
Mar-20-14  csmath: Svidler's opening is perfectly fine. He achieved better position after the opening and the only reason why he lost is that he started playing for a mate that was not there. This is why he blundered pawn with 24. ...h6?? and after that 25. ...Bd5? sealed the losing position.

Mamedyarov's opening is highly questionable and in some other circumstances he would have been punished for that. However here Svidler played ill-conceived attack on a diagonal while completely overlooking dangers to his own king. When he realized what had happened it was already too late. I guess he resigned in disgust.

This game will not be remembered for any great plans.

Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  john barleycorn: <csmath> pretty much what Svidler said in the press conference. 24....h6, 25...Bd5 and 26....Qd7 were 3 bad moves in a row and he could not explain those except by a failure of his brain activity... he took it with quite a sense of humour, though. Good player and seemingly a nice guy...
Mar-20-14  Edeltalent: <Doniez: Rg5 can be eligible for a Saturday puzzle. The best move of the tournament as of today.>

A very pretty finisher for sure, but as far as move of the tournament, it doesn't beat Kramnik's f5/Rf6 combo against Svidler in my book.

Mar-20-14  Edeltalent: <john barleycorn: <csmath> pretty much what Svidler said in the press conference. 24....h6, 25...Bd5 and 26....Qd7 were 3 bad moves in a row and he could not explain those except by a failure of his brain activity...>

Weren't the three moves he critisized 22...bxc4, 23...Qc8 and 24...h6 (instead suggesting 22...Qd7 with a good position)? I think after h6 it's already very bad for Black.

Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  john barleycorn: <Edeltalent> yes, I agree that move is something for the spectators and the game could have been won differently. Kramnik's defence, however, was the only way out.

Let me look at the video again, maybe my memory fails me here.

Mar-20-14  csmath: Clearly before 22. ...bxc4?! black was doing better. After 23. ...Qc8?! 24. h4?! black is still at least equal.

However 25. ...h6?? and 26. ...Bd5? is completely bogus "checkmate" plan after which his position cannot be sustained.

From the game that could have been a play for a win black ended up in the lost position.

Again, this game will not be remembered for some great strategy because of bizarre white opening to bizarre black blundering. This kind of chess happens sometimes even on this level.

Mar-20-14  Strelets: 24...h6?? 25...Bd5? 26...Qd7?! "A series of bad moves, once it has begun, is sometimes hard to stop." -Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian, ninth world champion of chess.
Mar-20-14  Strelets: Another memorable Petrosian quote: "If your opponent wants to play the Dutch Defense, then you let him."
Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: <csmath: Svidler's opening is perfectly fine.>

Really? How much you wanna bet he doesn't play it again in this tournament?

Mar-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <ajile: <csmath: Svidler's opening is perfectly fine.>

Really? How much you wanna bet he doesn't play it again in this tournament?>

Nothing wrong with <csmath>'s statement, and if Svidler were to play the Leningrad Dutch again in this event-or not-it still would not prove the ridiculous point you are attempting to make, which appears to be that because the player lost, it is attributable to the opening chosen by himself, and presumably due to the loss, should never essay it again.

Mar-21-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajile: <perfidious: <ajile: <csmath: Svidler's opening is perfectly fine.>

Really? How much you wanna bet he doesn't play it again in this tournament?>

Nothing wrong with <csmath>'s statement, and if Svidler were to play the Leningrad Dutch again in this event-or not-it still would not prove the ridiculous point you are attempting to make, which appears to be that because the player lost, it is attributable to the opening chosen by himself, and presumably due to the loss, should never essay it again.>

He won't play it again because while it has surprise value in a game with time limits it also has inherent dangers due to what I pointed out above. So it's extremely likely that the other players have lines ready to go if he tries it again. Compare this to Black openings that the players use over and over even in the same tournament. Of course it IS possible he might play this same opening again as Black in this tournament but the odds are against it and I would put money on those odds.

Mar-23-14  Everett: I cannot play either side of the Leningrad Dutch, so this entire game is incomprehensible to me.
Mar-25-14  paavoh: Well, Svidler did invite Kramnik to the Dutch today again. The previous predictions were of little value, eh?
Mar-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Natalia Pogonina: Annotations by GM Naiditsch:
http://pogonina.com/index.php?optio...
Mar-30-14  celtrusco: Peter Svidler, as Nadal does, scratches his noble parts with energy, at the final of the corridor. This act seems to give him good luck, or some psychological adventage, beacause his opponents afraid take his pieces. Mamedyarov's counterattack is rummaging through the ​​nose, with his thumb, seeking beat his tactics. Very hard players to fight.
The others have their things too...
I'm sorry, is what I watch.
Jul-22-17  SpiritedReposte: A slept on gem. At least the last move <31. Rg5!> That's like a one move Sunday puzzle I would not solve. The fact he saw it in the game no doubt in advance is not fair!
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