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Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand
"Something Vishy This Way Comes" (game of the day Jun-24-2014)
FIDE World Rapid Championship (2014), Dubai UAE, rd 12, Jun-18
Slav Defense: Exchange Variation (D10)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-26-14  SetNoEscapeOn: <But he's undoubtly the greatest. And if you disagree, ask yourself what it would take for you to acknowledge that fact.>

Ten more years or so of similar performances would do it for me. Kasparov dominated four generations of chess players.

Jun-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: By the time Carlsen reaches thirty-five, we may have something to discuss: for now, less objective observers will have to remain content in the knowledge that he is champion and the strongest player in the world without question.
Jun-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: <SetNoEscapeOn>: <Ten more years or so of similar performances would do it for me. Kasparov dominated four generations of chess players.>

To be sure. It's "undoubtedly" impossible to name any world champion as "the greatest" less then a year into his reign. Unless we mean "the greatest NOW", which is implied by the title "World Champion".

Jun-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Time will tell exactly where Carlsen belongs in the pantheon of chess greats. But I will note that he became world champion shortly before his 23rd birthday, and has the highest rating in history. He also has a large rating lead over the No. 2 player in the world (currently 72.5 points). http://2700chess.com/ That is one of the largest rating leads in modern history. Fischer's rating before his match against Spassky was 125 points above anyone else; Kasparov's biggest lead over the No. 2 player was 82 points. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_... Carlsen's progress in chess so far has been extraordinary. Given his young age, he is likely to continue to improve for a decade or so. (I think players typically peak at around age 35.)
Jun-26-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Petrosianic: Exactly, time will tell. And without having had time, we can't place him yet. If he retires tomorrow, there's probably no way he'll be regarded as the greatest.
Jun-26-14  Absentee: <Petrosianic: Unless we mean "the greatest NOW", which is implied by the title "World Champion".>

Not really. The only implication in the title "World Champion" is that someone claimed the title or won an event where it was at stake.

Anyway, I suspect he simply meant "the strongest" of all time. Considering purely the quality of the moves it is a reasonable claim.

Jun-26-14  Everett: <FSR> ratings mean little, if only for years they were not considered vital when performing in tournaments and gaining the WC title.

For Karpov, the important thing was simply winning the tournament, not ratings points and not some distance from his nearest opponent. He did not care by how much he won. I don't see any good reason for him to be "punished" for coasting in his role as WC.

That's the biggest problem with numbers in general. They are ever just reflections, not completely real. They tell us some things, but leave out a whole bunch.

Jun-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Good use of symmetry in this game. After 8...e6, it's symmetrical.


click for larger view

After 18...Ne4, it's symmetrical still (except for the rooks)


click for larger view

After 22.Bh2, it's still symmetrical (except for the rooks).


click for larger view

After Carlsen exchanged the rook for a knight and bishop, that ended any symmetry.

Jun-29-14  Absentee: <Everett: <FSR> ratings mean little, if only for years they were not considered vital when performing in tournaments and gaining the WC title.>

How ratings were/are considered is irrelevant in regard to what they mean.

<For Karpov, the important thing was simply winning the tournament, not ratings points and not some distance from his nearest opponent. He did not care by how much he won. I don't see any good reason for him to be "punished" for coasting in his role as WC.>

This implies that you know what Karpov thought. Besides that, it's possible that he didn't try to win all of his games, but then that's what ratings tell you: that he didn't perform as well as others did. You can call it a punishment if you like, but that's not going to change the matter of fact: those are his results and an 80% score is better than a 65% score.

I'm under the impression, to put it diplomatically, that ratings just don't tell you what you'd like to hear.

Jun-29-14  Sally Simpson: Square colours in your mind's chessboard - good simple fun but try this.

White to play.


click for larger view

To win place a White Knight on c8 or d8.

One wins and one only draws. Which one?

----------Ratings----------

Don't let us start another rating debate. Nobody wins.

The number lovers are closed minds. There argument being you cannot argue with maths.

You might as well go to a holy joe forum and try and convert them to your chosen religion.

Today's players have higher grades - todays players are better.

It's simplicity of this statement that attracts them.

Don't mention rating inflation. The slamming of their minds is deafening.

Don't tell them that in 1972 there were 13 players graded over 2600. (only one over 2700 - Robert James Fischer.)

Today there are 48 playwers over 2700 - ergo we suddenly have 48 Bobby Fischers. (can anyone name these fabulous 48)

Today there are over 100 players between 2600-2699 (some are not even GM's.) These chosen 100 are on the same par as Spassky, Petrosian, Polguaevsky, Korchnoi, Portisch, Botvinnik, Karpov, Larsen, Tal, Smyslov, Stein, Keres, and Hort.

They must be....you cannot argue with maths.

Jun-29-14  Absentee: <Sally Simpson: Today's players have higher grades - todays players are better.>

I'm not sure who you're replying to, since nobody here said that. So who were you addressing?

Jun-29-14  Sally Simpson: Hi Absentee,

"So who were you addressing?"

Them!

I won't point them out, they know who they are.

Jun-29-14  Everett: <How ratings were/are considered is irrelevant in regard to what they mean.>

I do not agree with this. The relationship is quite relevant.

<I'm under the impression, to put it diplomatically, that ratings just don't tell you what you'd like to hear.>

On the contrary I'm quite certain you place too much weight on numbers.

Jul-01-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Magnus says in an interview with Espen Agdestein https://chess24.com/en/read/news/ca... that he completely missed the skewer 34...Rb6

"I was completely obsessed that he would play 34...Rb3"

Jul-03-14  Everett: Cracks in the armor. Anand will not believe Carlsen as much this time around, though Carlsen will likely still prevail. Very much looking forward to it.
Jul-03-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  LucB: <One wins and one only draws. Which one?>

The one on c8. It first goes to d6, then f5 and finally mates on g3. So from your above position (with a knight on c8 and white to play), we have:

1.Nd6 Kh1
2.Nf5 h2
3.Ng3#

Jul-25-14  IraqSon: The boy became a champion and highest rated by FIDE will, the candidate system and the games he played prove this story. he was ripped apart like a novice by Svidler and Ivanchuck.
Jul-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <IraqSon: (Carlsen) was ripped apart like a novice (in the Candidates) by Svidler and Ivanchuck (sic).>

Oh, the games certainly bear out this view.

Yet another detractor emerges from the muck, ready to reinvent chess history.

Jul-25-14  Rascal Nikov: yes, Carlsen was definitely ripped apart like a novice in the Candidates.
Jul-25-14  Rascal Nikov: Anand will surely win his title back.
Jul-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  SirRuthless: Not sure about that but any result against Carlsen is an important result imo. To defeat him in any time control. To go through the rigamarole during prep, find the right ideas over the board, and actually execute the moves until he reaches out and offers his hand in resignation is a great thing that not every elite player is capable of doing. Anand can only draw confidence from this game.
Jul-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Rascal> Would you lay odds on that at Ladbrokes?
Oct-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: How do you beat Carlsen?

Chesspublishing columnist IM Max Illingworth in his September 2014 update drew attention to the opening in this game: 7.Rc1 in Slav Exchange variation (7.Qb3 is the main line).

The Symmetrical Exchange Slav with delayed Nf3. Position after 7.Rc1


click for larger view

"With the bishop already targeting c7 the rook occupies the file with long term prospects in view."

7...Rc8 8.Nf3 e6 9.Qb3 Bb4


click for larger view

Here, instead of 10.Bb5?!, Illingworth recommends 10.Ne5.

http://www.thechessworld.com/learn-...

Nov-03-14  cbpatzer: Venue, schedule, and tickets and good info http://www.chessdom.com/match-carls...
Jan-02-17  MoKy: 35.Kc2! Rxd6 36.Nc5 a4 37.Kb3 and the a-pawn is lost
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