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Wesley So vs Timur Gareyev
US Championship (2015), St Louis, MO USA, rd 5, Apr-05
French Defense: Rubinstein. Fort Knox Variation (C10)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: A mature approach by So to this eccentric opening. Just take what the position offers and slowly improve it. Eventually black just runs out of constructive moves.
Apr-05-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <iking: premature resignation?> White is up full 2 pawns; in a consolidated position ...
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <Marmot PFL: A mature approach by So to this eccentric opening. Just take what the position offers and slowly improve it. Eventually black just runs out of constructive moves.>

My thoughts exactly.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Karne: So is arguably one of the most "unnatural" players in the entire history of chess.
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Probably the early resignation was a "practical" decision by Gareev.

Save energy for the next fight, because here he faces a long grind with slim chance of an equalizing blunder due to the limited number of chess men on the board.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: <Timur is always unpredictable...even in the final position...I had been thinking for like 8 minutes and then he came to me and offered me his hand.

And of course, me being the gentleman, I had to shake it, and wait if he put put 1-0 or 1/2 on his scoresheet (laughs)>

Wesley So around 4:46 http://www.uschesschamps.com/2015-u...

Apr-06-15  kellmano: Nice quote <tamar>. I like this Timur guy - don't think it's two full pawns in this position is it? White has to defend the Knight and then a pawn goes. That h-pawn will presumably win it but still ...
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: < Apr-05-15 Jayz: "@chess24com: So: After 8 min he came & offered his hand.As a gentleman I shook it unsure if > Premature resignation? That game could have gone on for another 42 moves. I guess it's a Sunday. Or GM Gareev probably deems himself unworthy. When one would think he is presented with an opportunity to show resiliency, courage, endgame proficiency, a comeback guy ...

What happened there? I did not pay $25 to watch the games. But what's the real story?

Because it seems the blunder occurred away from the table.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: < Apr-06-15 dunkenchess: Kaya nagresign si Gareev dahil alam na. > GM Gareev doesn't have to leave the barn.

25.Qh5 and 44.Re6

Sevian and Troff had their bare backs down on the pesky hay but lady Madonna got on top of them.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: USCF, and FIDE for that matter, hopefully someday would give the Tournament Director the power to overrule these kinds of draws. Endgame is not an exercise in futility. There's beauty in the execution of endgame. I suspect Magnus Carlsen would have continued to play on with that position. Not to play for a draw but to play for a win.

If I have my own tournament, games will end in stalemate, repetition of moves or by checkmate.

Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: Previous 3 are reposts from So page in reference to this game.
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <kellmano: ... - don't think it's two full pawns in this position is it? White has to defend the Knight and then a pawn goes. That h-pawn will presumably win it but still ...>

Anything wrong with <43.Qd3>?

Apr-06-15  haydn20: 43. Qd3 is best I think. I tried several lines and couldn't find a way to stop the h Pawn. If I'm playing Black vs someone my level I play on. If I'm a GM vs So, I probably quit.
Apr-06-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: So said in the interview he would have probably ended up playing 43 Qf6 simply because 43...Qxb3 44 Ne5 exchanges off to a won King and Pawn ending.

43 Qd3 looks winning as well, but it would take a long time-Houdini shows White taking control by move 51.

Stockfish saw a third way 43 Ne5 Nxe5 44 Qh6+ Ke8 45 Qh8+ Kd7 46 dxe5 +24.46/42 (!) The idea is similar to So's thought with 43 Qf6, but dispenses with the pin to threaten the pawn endgame. Black can avoid that with the King walk to d7, but then the pawn recapture is winning for White.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  iking: thanks for the insight <tamar> ....
Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: The thing is, White faces almost an 'embarrassment of riches' here when it comes to how/when to transform the final position into a winning endgame. For instance, he can play the <43.Qd3>, hold onto the two pawn advantage, and prepare the transition. Or he can play the intended <43.Qf6> and go for the pawn endgame immediately. (Or he play the overpowering <43.Ne5> and force the issues in a really sublime way.)

After the intended <43.Qf6>, the thematic pawn endgame is this (or similar):


click for larger view

Note that White K is already 'catching' the b-pawn while Black K is tied down holding off the pawn pair on the K-side. Thus, next key position shall be a variation of something like this:


click for larger view

Now we have a clearly resignable position for Black:
If it is White move, then <1.d5> wins. And even if it is Black move, <1...Ke5 2.h6 Kf6> only postpones the decisive <3.d5> one extra move.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: Nice analysis, <Gypsy>.
Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  iking: the Gypsy did it again .. wonderful insight
Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: Thx <Fusilli>. But I do need to tighten up things a bit:

< And even if it is Black move, <1...Ke5 2.h6 Kf6> only postpones the decisive <3.d5> one extra move.> I dropped an important move here. It is only after <1...Ke5 2.h6 Kf6> and <3.f5...>, that the stage for d4-d5 is really set.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: Thx <iking>. (And sorry about the goof.)
Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <Gypsy> <I dropped an important move here...>

All fine, but you mean 1...Ke6, not 1...Ke5.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: Wesley So said he expects < 43... Qd6+ > after his < 43.Qf6 > and the Qs would be exchanged.

That leaves White with a N and 4 unconnected pawns versus a N and 2 connected pawns for Black.

Is there a hardline sequence of moves for a White win after the Q exchange?

Thank you in advance.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: < Gypsy > that's more than I expected. Thorough. Clean. Very informative. Thank you so much!
Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <bubuli55> This knight endgame, I think, is the toughest nut to crack here. A Botvinnik rule states that knight-and-pawn endgames play very much like the pawn endgames. But they are more tactical, I think, and less tractable. (Thus, I personally would have preferred the <43.Qd3>.) As it is, Black pieces are playing slightly better after the queen exchange and white pawns are all separated, which diminishes the White edge of two extra pawns.

Now, more often than not, congruent with the Botvinnik rule, knight endgames tend to involve tempo work.

Here is a variation that I consider fairly central. But it is neither forced, nor computer verified:

<43.Qf6 Qd6+ 44.Qxd6 Nxd6> and now <45.Kg3 Ne4+ 46.Kg2 Kg7> (It looks daf to actually invite the annoying 45...Ne4+; but there is rational tempo-based purpose behind inviting it. It will show up shortly. As for Black king, it goes towards the most dangerous pawn; the alternative 46...Ke7 looks like a valid branch, but if 46...Kf7, then 48.Ng5+ forces a pawn-endgame clearly won for White.)

<47.Ng5 Nd2 48.b4...>


click for larger view

As it turns out, Black knight here has a hard time raiding White pawns. For instance,

<48...Nb3 49.Nf3...> and <49...Nc1 50.Ne1 Na2 51.Nc2...> or

<49...Na1 50.Ne1 Nb3 51.Nc2 Nd2 52.f3...>

Yet, as soon as the black knight lets up its raid, White finishes consolidating his position.

Apr-07-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gypsy: <bubuli55: < Gypsy > that's more than I expected. Thorough. Clean. Very informative. Thank you so much!>

Sorry for yanking it for a while. Had to fix a few things.

Thanks in return.

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