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Hikaru Nakamura vs Magnus Carlsen
Carlsen-Nakamura Chess.com Blitz Battle (2016), chess.com INT, rd 25, Oct-27
Bishop's Opening: Vienna Hybrid (C28)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-28-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: Could be the longest K+P ending in history.
Oct-28-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Ridiculously long. It could have been agreed drawn at the 56th move.
Oct-28-16  Jacob Arnold: After the game he said in the interview that he continued playing because it was "good match strategy".
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: ...Although, since it probably lasted about 3 minutes, it might be the <shortest> K+P ending in history.
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: Very funny :)
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: The last part is serious offense to chess.
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: 47...h3! (also on move 50) wins, btw - it leaves White without any tempo moves with the pawns while Black still has one at his disposal (...b6), so a zugzwang that would allow the black king to penetrate can be achieved.
Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Eyal: 47...h3! (also on move 50) wins, btw - it leaves White without any tempo moves with the pawns while Black still has one at his disposal (...b6), so a zugzwang that would allow the black king to penetrate can be achieved.>

Superb! Who would have thought that a crappy old bullet game could possibly be quite interesting?


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In desperate time troube, which begins in bullet games from move 1⁄2, Carlsen played 47...Kc7.

He could have played 47....h3! .


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To keep the black king out after that , White would play 48. Kd3. But then after 48...Ke5 49. Ke3 there is the colossal tempo move 49...b6.

White is now in poo-poo street and must let the black king in!

And as Eyal points out it happens a few moves later as well.

Oct-29-16  7he5haman: <Eyal>, <Offramp>

47...h3! Does indeed win, although, as I'm sure you're aware, it's not just a matter of penetrating with the King and gobbling White's pawns... Far from it, actually! (As far as I can tell without using a board.)

Indeed, after Offramp's line, if Black is too greedy then he loses! I.e. 49...b6 50.Kf3 Kd4 51.Kg3 Kc3?? 52.Kxh3 Kxb3 53.Kg2 Kxc4 54.h4! Wins for WHITE! :-)

Instead, in the line above, Black wins with 51...Ke3! 52.Kxh3 Kf3! (zugzwang!) 53.b4 axb4! With an eventual ...Qf1# :-)

A cool finish!

Oct-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gregor Samsa Mendel: The draw was finally agreed when the two kings sat down on their respective squares and refused to move any further, saying that their feet hurt.
Oct-29-16  7he5haman: (In fact the themes in my last post make me vaguely recall an Ivanchuk game that was also a fast time control game - though I cannot remember who he was playing!)
Oct-31-16  gauer:


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(white wins, by Emanuel Lasker and Gustavus Charles Reichhelm - a 1901 study of corresponding squares). In this ending, the way those ♔s were moving makes one wonder whether either player had any motivations to outnumber the opposing monarch as well. Is any software developed that draws out a map of such squares when such an endgame test study is fed to it?

Nov-01-16  7he5haman: Here's the game I was thinking of in my previous post!

Ivanchuk vs Wang Yue, 2009

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