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Georg Halvax vs Alina Dmitrievna Ivanova
JWC2/pr3 (2012), ICCF, Feb-01
Russian Game: Nimzowitsch Attack (C42)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  malt: I had come up with 50.a7 Rg8 51.b7 Rff8
52.c5 Kg7 but it looks like as
<agb2002> says 52...Ra8 stops the pawns
Aug-27-17  The Kings Domain: What a game! Missed the puzzle and decided on 50) c5 thinking that the three pawns at once would be too much for the towers. Instructive endgame study and a tour de force of a game.
Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Too difficult for me as most of the Sunday ones are. I didn't think the pawns could make it.

A very interesting game and well played by White. Very clever play.

Aug-27-17  Pseudotsuga: <offramp: A really good endgame, especially from a nineteen year old.

I'm puzzled by the <ICCF> in the game's header. It can't be a correspondence game, because it is played out to checkmate, which would waste the price of four bratwurst.> Not even one bratwurst: conditional moves.

Aug-27-17  dumbgai: Silly black actually played this out to mate.
Aug-27-17  RandomVisitor: After 50.b7


click for larger view

Stockfish_17081107_x64_modern: <1 hour computer time, 8 cores>

<+132.60/58 50...Rg8 51.c5> Rf4 52.c6 Rb4+ 53.Kc1 Rf4 54.c7 Rff8 55.Kb2 Kg7 56.a7 Ra8 57.b8Q h5 58.Kc3 Rh8 59.Kd4 h4 60.Qb7 Kf6 61.Qf3+ Kg5 62.Qg2+ Kf4 63.Qh3 Rae8 64.Kc5 Re5+ 65.Kc6 Rh6+ 66.Kb7 Rb5+ 67.Ka8 Rc5 68.c8Q Rxc8+ 69.Qxc8 Rh5 70.Qd7 Kg3 71.Kb7 Rh8 72.Qg7+ Kh3 73.Qxh8

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: In any case, a most remarkable game that offers numerous positions for puzzle problems

*****

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Pseudotsuga: <offramp: A really good endgame, especially from a nineteen year old. I'm puzzled by the <ICCF> in the game's header. It can't be a correspondence game, because it is played out to checkmate, which would waste the price of four bratwurst.> Not even one bratwurst: conditional moves.>

Hmm. So Halvax wrote,
"75. Kb7.
If now 75...Ke5 or Ke7 or Ke6 or Kd5 then 76. c7. If then ..." etc etc etc. Seems a bit long-winded. I suspect many corres players might resign a ♔+♕ v ♔ endgame.

Aug-27-17  RandomVisitor: The critical position is after 54.c7!


click for larger view

White will play b8=Q. Like a bad first-person-shooter video game, if captured the queen will just re-spawn on b8 - twice, first after say c7xb8, then a7xb8. A white queen remains after both rooks are gone.

Black is paralyzed after b8=Q, so white just marched the king to b7 and it is game over, insert coin.

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's Sunday puzzle (50. ?), it's obvious White needs to push one of his passed pawns. But which one? The most likely candidates are 50. b7 or 50. a7.

My goal was to get two and then three pawns to the seventh rank and then promote, and I didn't think Black could stop this plan no matter which pawn was pushed first. However, that was a wrong assumption.

So I unfortunately picked the wrong pawn push 50. a7?, which, as <agb2002> observes, allows Black to turn the tables and steal the win with 50...Rf8 51. b7 Rgg8 52. c5 Ra8 -+ (diagram below.)


click for larger view

In this White to move position (diagram above,) Stockfish 8 indicates it's mate-in-17 for Black.

Correct of course is the game move 50. b7! [] which secures the win for White after 50. b7! [] Rf8 51. c5! [] Rgg8 53. c6 [] Ra8 +- (diagram below.)


click for larger view

In this White to move position (diagram above,) White wins with 54. c7! [] +- (+6.43 @ 36 depth, Stockfish 8.) All other White moves allow Black to steal the win (e.g. 54. Kc1? Rxa6 55. c7 Raa8 56. Kd2 Rac8 -+.)

P.S.: Black's first significant mistake, turning the game strongly in White's favor, was allowing a Queen fork which wins a pawn for White after 12...dxe5? 13. Bxg4 Qxg4 14. Qd5 ± (+0.91 @ 32 depth, Stockfish 8.)

Instead, Black should play 12...Bxe2 13.Ng6 (13.Qxe2 dxe5 ⩲) 13...fxg6 14.Qxe2 Qe6 15. Kb1 Rae8 = to ⩲ (+0.27 @ 32 depth, Stockfish 8) with a near level position.

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Melts u b7 bunghood vims mind over f8 flushoust bunks o 50...R8 geos meos ghosthunt 1 ousts conts vims c5 clucks bunk h5 honour vons guvs bunks o 51...Rb8 goes feet bullrushy vets 1 2 ousts conts vims blocks a6 affable g8 ghosthung lunks c6 clunkus a8 ashenface lunks o c7 clunghug bunks o g7 goodhung b8 brilliant vims aves line h4 hoods by it c3 cint by it h3 hint c4 clunk bungs daddyus 57.Kd4 v ho duddy 2 ousts conts vims o f6 fluffus visor blind hutcher 57...h2 he he hubs 2 ousts conts vims lunks behemoth 58.Kb5 wo be bungus lunks bullrush 58.Qb6+ wobble boundus 2 3 it ok vons guvs cove ousts conts vims then penetrate and promote c8 churchmen u h2 hubs as vimus wins it 3 cint ousts vims then punts c6 chordus a8 aortahung promote c8 churchmen again choose ousts compute vims aves melt bong i v kind jews q as i cuff chooser promoted it's vast wily flav viva peas it's vast i welly pass over ales wispy wheals yips apes wily pail yews wail espy flav viva play wise laws yipe lays wipe yaps wiles ways piles u b7 bunghood aves melt lint tubs bons nobs vows cove bong i vons ugly glock kind duck jews q vibe as i c cuff chooser c8 churchmen vims then promo cover 50.b7 Rf8 bunghood dont boos to a goose boot bunt vows buts trouble blurt bint tubs tubby bounty b7 behemoth bogs gobs fogs flung funs gust guvs noon guff flubb flob bung bugs grubs uv muck mock coms clung club cobs cogs block buck moggy mugs ghost 50...Rg8 geos meos ghoulhung 1 ousts conts vims clunk u 51.c5 h5 guff hentup bungs o 51...Rb8 goes feet bullrushy vets 1 2 ousts conts vims avows by 52.a7 Rgg8 53.c6 Ra8 54.c7 Kg7 55.b8Q h4 56.Kc3 v h3 57.Kc4 v lo chump dunks buddy daddyus 57.Kd4 v hods duddy 2 ousts conts vims flunk fluffus 57...Kf6 heel o hubby blind hutcher 57...h2 he he hubs 2 ousts conts vims lunks behemoth 58.Kb5 wo be bungus lunks bullrush 58.Qb6+ wobble boundus 2 3 it ok vons guvs cove ousts conts vims then penetrate and promote c8 churchmen u h2 hubs as vimus wins it 3 cint v ousts vims then punts c6 chordus a8 aortahung promote c8 churchmen again choose ousts compute vims aves hand good dang hods hood dutch duggy dogs gods hods gave in blew away foots um tomorrow moggy good edit ok vons guvs cosy four band vims gods rule bottom boys buts tubby bunt trouble vons guvs hods huds dutch hohs huhs flush hoof coff choochoo chuff photo beam bine vims chumps;

um ebullient na flush cogs key hood jobs v awooga a7 aragorns blade by c8 churchman vims it ok vons guvs chugger aves melts u b7 bunghood;

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I tried 50 c5 as well.

Anyway, in that failed try here's a decent derivative puzzle after the line 50 c5 Rff1 51 b7 Rb1+ 52 Kc3 Rg8 53 c6.


click for larger view

Black to play and win.

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The second diagram above, which follows from the winning move 50. b7!, reminds me of the successful Wishbone Triple Option offensive formation developed for the University of Texas football team by Offensive Coordinator Emory Ballard in 1968.

The Tripple Option was all the rage among numerous college football programs in the 1970s and even into the 1980s. However, today the triple option is mostly run by the service academies (Air Force, Navy, and Army) and Georgia Tech to give their players an advantage against their usually bigger Division 1A opponents.

The wishbone formation possibility after 50. b7! gives Whites three passed pawns a winning advantage against Black's heavy pieces (i.e. the two Rooks)

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Jimfromprovidence> The Triple Option formation doesn't always win. In your diagram above, Black wins with 53...Bb6! 54. c7 (54. a7 Rc6+ 55. Kd4 Rcc8) -+ 54...Rc6+ 55. Kb4 Rxc7 56. Kb5 h5 57. Kb6 Rxc2 58. a7 Rb2+ 59. Kc7 Rxb7+ 60. Kxb7 h4 -+.

P.S.: Reminds me of how defenses adjusted to the football triple option. By getting fast and strong defenders quickly into the offensive backfield, defensive coordinators found they could disrupt the hand off and pitching options, and slow down the triple option enough to make it less appealing to opposing college football coaches.

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Hey, I was right and first

Yipppeeeee!!

*****

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Random Visitor> Enjoyed your prose. You write well.

In you diagram after 54. c7!, it's worth nothing that if Black tries 54...Rxa7 (diagram below,)


click for larger view

stronger and much easier than 55. b8=Q Ra8 56. Qb5! +- (+7.61 @ 38 depth, Stockfish 8) is 55. c8=Q +- (+51.13 @ 39 depth, Stockfish 8.)

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: I am happy that my intuition <50.b7> proved correct vs other tries :)

*****

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: This puzzle is not only about why 50.b7 wins, but why all the other seemingly plausible moves don't! Very surprising that this is a "forced-move" situation.
Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <offramp: ... I'm puzzled by the <ICCF> in the game's header. It can't be a correspondence game, because it is played out to checkmate.>

Or it is and black forced white to make the last 10+ moves out of spite?

Is JWC something like Junior World Championship?

Anyway, I agree with the general sentiment. This is a jewel of a puzzle.

Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Marmot PFL: When I first started going to tournaments I saw a game like this with a master playing white. Some "expert" said white was lost because even if he promoted a pawn he was still down material. Had to ask but what if he promotes two or three pawns? which is just what happened.
Aug-27-17  stacase: <patzer2: ...it's obvious White needs to push one of his passed pawns. But which one? ...
So I unfortunately picked the wrong pawn push 50. a7>

Ha! I guessed the other (-:

Aug-27-17  Altairvega: Three white pawns in the 7th row, the two black rooks in the 8th, the fight will end with one white Queen remained. This Queen will be exchanged with the h black pawn and then white will promote the c2 pawn in to Queen and will win.
Aug-27-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  pittpanther: Why doesn't black play 57....h2? White can't play c8 because the room captures with check.
Aug-27-17  RandomVisitor: After 8.Qd2 black likely has an even game, but play soon gets out of hand. Perhaps black was not using a computer.


click for larger view

Stockfish_17081107_x64_modern: <8.5 hours computer time, 8 cores>

<+0.17/50 8...c6 9.0-0-0 Re8> 10.Kb1 Nd7 11.Bd3 d5 12.h4 Bc5 13.Bd4 Bxd4 14.cxd4 Nf6 15.Rde1 Ne4 16.Qf4 Qf6 17.Qxf6 Nxf6 18.Kc1 Ne4 19.Nd2 Bf5 20.Bxe4 Bxe4 21.f3 Bg6 22.Nb3 h5 23.Kd2 b6 24.Nc1 Bf5 25.Ne2 g6 26.Nf4 a5 27.a4 Kf8 28.b3 Rxe1 29.Rxe1 Re8 30.Rxe8+ Kxe8 31.g3 Kd7 32.Ng2 Kc7 33.Ne3 Be6 34.g4 Bd7 35.g5 Kd6 36.c3

Aug-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Pseudotsuga: 34...Rxb4+ 35. cxb4 Rxb4+ 36. Ka2> <36. Kc3..<<>>> Of course. I totally missed that.
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