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Viswanathan Anand vs Yifan Hou
GRENKE Chess Classic (2018), Karlsruhe GER, rd 1, Mar-31
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. King's Knight Variation (A15)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Mar-31-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Another first round brawl. Hope this represents a good omen for the tournament. Anand's Exchange sacrifice looks like a necessary resource to counter Hou's pawn sacrifice to control the dark squares. At the end, both players set up fortresses that neither could penetrate.
Apr-01-18  Bluegrey: 34. Qd2 would have offered winning chances for white according to brief computer evals. I think that plan would have allowed white to potentially push his majority on the queenside. Prime Vishy would have potentially taken that route
Apr-01-18  Ulhumbrus: 7 g4 looks like a completely unsound attack. However if any advantage which it passes to Black is only slight, it is then a mistake for black to overestimate his advantage and try a violent counter-attack. Black may have made this mistake in the games Karjakin vs Kramnik, 2018 (kibitz #45) and Karjakin vs Anand, 2016

The wiser course may be for Black to continue to try to complete her development by eg 7...Nc6

7...d4?! plays for an attack and may reduce Black's slight advantage or let it slip or even pass it back to White.

According to the chessbase comment 13 Qe2!! is an innovation. It offers an exchange sacrifice worthy of Spassky or perhaps Topalov. White's compensation does not show itself immediately or even quickly but only slowly.

After 24 Bd5 White's bishop may be worth a rook and if that is the case White has suffficient compensation for the exchange.

Is 34 Qe3 necessary? One alternative is 34 Qd2 aiming for the h6 square

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