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Ray Robson vs Fabiano Caruana
US Championship (2018), St Louis, MO USA, rd 6, Apr-23
Russian Game: Nimzowitsch Attack (C42)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-23-18  JohnDMaster: Is the pawn sac theory or home prep by the Fab?
Apr-23-18  CountryGirl: What a powerful finish. Caruana had great, Spassky-like insight to use the initiative and mount such an attack.
Apr-23-18  Lupara: <JohnDMaster> In response to your question, in his post-game interview, Caruana indicated the pawn sacrifice in the opening was prep.

He didn't want to play 13. ... Be6, because it was equal play. He considered 13. ... Bf5 gave more chances because his computer indicated it was playable.

He also indicated it helps to know the position better than the other player.

That's the thing about some of these top level GMs, they have a feel for the initiative.

Apr-23-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: < Lupara: <JohnDMaster> In response to your question, in his post-game interview, Caruana indicated the pawn sacrifice in the opening was prep. He didn't want to play 13. ... Be6, because it was equal play. He considered 13. ... Bf5 gave more chances because his computer indicated it was playable.

That's the thing about some of these top level GMs, they have a feel for the initiative.>

I don't how much of a "feel" it is to choose a move after the computer indicates it's playable. I mean it's only a distant cousin of the old-fashioned "leap of faith" or "intuition" or "hunch", especially since the statement about knowing the position better and admitting it was prep means he had already analyzed it out.

Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: 13...Bf5 or 13...Be6, "feel" or playing as the computer told him to, what really matters is that Caruana has over the past few months found a lot of new attacking ideas in the Petroff that will make his opponents think twice about opening 1.e4.
Apr-24-18  Lupara: <ChessHigherCat> You should check out the interview. Caruana explains that his move 13. ... Bf5 was not very deeply analyzed but his computer indicated it was playable. It does not appear that it led to any significant advantage for him, as Robson had a playable position for much of the game and could have obtained an advantage on move 29.

As to my use of the word "feel", I was referring to initiative, not a TN in the opening. And if you look at the post by <CountryGirl>, where she compares Caruana's final attack to <"... Spassky-like insight to use the initiative ..."> you may better understand why my last sentence/paragraph in that post mentions <"...top level GMs ...have a feel for initiative."> I meant to address her comment, but did not properly direct it to her.

Certainly, I thought most posters on this site would pick up on that, since that sentence/paragraph has nothing to do with opening prep. But alas, I'll try to be more formal next time.

: )

Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <Lupara: I see, the fourth sentence was a reply to CG. It seemed like a non-sequitur as a conclusion to first three sentences. At any rate it's certainly true he's a master at keeping the initiative. I've noticed GMs tend to "defend and counterattack" at the same time to prevent their opponents from pursuing their plans.
Apr-24-18  starry2013: Robson time trouble, not a new thing.
Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: A good game entertaining game.

I cannot win the pinned Rook on d3


click for larger view

I'll pin it again on d5 and then I'll win it.


click for larger view

39...Qc6+

Lupara is correct with how a top GM can 'feel' a position.

A computer will spit out all kinds of moves and variations The good guys can spot a wee gem from all the chaff without going deep and analysing it into dust.

The train of thought goes something like this:

"The pawn sac has no immediate refutation, it leads to a position full of ideas that I know I can play. Black has to find OTB some exact moves."

And Caruana would have summed that up in his mind a lot quicker than it took me to type that.

Possibly adding a quick check to see if there is any White joy in Not taking the pawn. (the saccers nightmare)


click for larger view

If he had been playing me I would have played 15.Nd4 Bg6 and 16.h4 or 16.g4 I'm not taking your scaffy IQP to defend, I do the attacking in this game.

Apr-24-18  Lupara: The post-game interview with Caruana regarding this game begins at 2:01:10 in the video below:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LI...

Apr-24-18  Ulhumbrus: 11 c4? defeats the purpose of White's opening, which is to provide a pawn cover that is difficult for Black to crack, as in the game Karjakin vs Caruana, 2018
Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Caruana has never won a game with the Petroff! Repertoire Explorer: Fabiano Caruana (black) This news will doubtless come as a surprise to Aronian, Grischuk, Vitiugov, and Robson.
Apr-24-18  Lupara: <FSR> I don't think Caruana beat Aronian from the Black side of the Petroff, but you can definitely put Kramnik on your list. And that game see-sawed back and forth:

Kramnik vs Caruana, 2018

Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Lupara> Thanks for the correction. That is the game I had in mind.
Apr-24-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: For the finish, if 40. Rc5 then Qe4+ wins the queen net, as opposed to Qxc5+, which just wins a rook (nothing earth-shaking, just a note for beginners)
Apr-24-18  Lupara: When I originally posted the link to video of the Round 6 coverage and the interview of Caruana, the video was about 4 hours long and the interview started at 2:01:10.

Since then, they restored all of the Round 6 coverage and the video is now almost 6 hours long and the Caruana interview starts at 3:56:15.

Apr-25-18  Saniyat24: Ray Robson is 22 years now, change his boyish pic...! :P
Apr-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: That was suggest back in 2017.

Ray Robson (kibitz #447)

The lad also supplied a picture.

http://followchess.com/news/ray-rob...

and there is quite a difference from the picture on Robbo's page.

Ray Robson

Apr-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: This would be a good replacement:

http://www.chessdom.com/wp-content/...

Apr-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: That will do me chancho.

Perhaps C.G. could ask him to supply a pic, he might want one with his sponsors logo on his jacket or baseball hat.

(providing of course he has one..... a sponsor, not a baseball hat.)

Apr-25-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Another great zwischenzug by a Super GM:

30...Bg5.

The super elite players are distinguished by the zwischenzug, above all else but opening prep.

May-03-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4: d 28 dpa

<1. + / = (0.68): 29.Qxb5> f6 30.Bd6 Kh7 31.b4 Re1+ 32.Kb2 Rb1+ 33.Ka2 Rd1 34.Qe2 Rxd2+ 35.Qxd2 Bb6 36.Kb2 Bxd4 37.cxd4 Qe6 38.Bc5 Bf7 39.d5 Qxd5 40.Qxd5 Bxd5 41.g3 g5 42.fxg5 fxg5 43.Kc3 Kg8 44.b5 Kf7 45.Kd4 Ke6 46.Bf8 h5 47.Kc5 g4 48.Bh6 Bf3 49.Bd2 Kd7 50.Kb6 Kc8 51.Ka7

2. = (0.00): 29.f5 Rxe5 30.fxg6 Re1+ 31.Ka2 Qxg6 32.Qxb5 Qb1+ 33.Kb3 Bg5 34.Rc2 Qd1 35.Qc6 Re3 36.Qc8+ Kh7 37.Ka2 Re1 38.Qf5+ Kg8 39.Qc8+ Kh7 40.Qf5+

<black bishops are a positional adventage thou to be respected>

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