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Ian Nepomniachtchi vs Vladimir Kramnik
Tata Steel Masters (2019), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 3, Jan-14
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Rio Gambit Accepted (C67)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-14-19  Atking: Now 25...Na6 for xc3 but also 26...Nc5 For example 26.Rd4 Nc5 27.Bc2 Re8
Jan-14-19  Atking: Like yesterday Kramnik is thinking a lot trying a great concept just to miss a detail. Such way top play it is not your opponent which wins it's you whot lost.
Jan-14-19  Atking: 29.Qd3 and then ?
Jan-14-19  Atking: On 29.Qd3 Qa1 30.Re4 Nc3 31.Re1
Jan-14-19  BOSTER: Black has to protect vs Bc2.
Jan-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: resigns
Jan-14-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beenthere240: es finito
Jan-14-19  Ulhumbrus: <Atking: On 20....Bg5 21.hxB QxB 22.QxQ hxQ 23.Re7 Rc8 24.Ne4 Bxd5 as 25.RxN is not a threat 25..RxR 26.BxB Rc1#> In this line an alternative to 25 Rxc7 is 25 Nxd6 eg 25...Rd8 26 Bxd5 Rxd6 28 Bb3 Rd2 29 Rxf7!
Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d20 dpa

1. + / = (0.54): 33...Qd4> 34.Re4 Qd5 35.Qxd5 Bxd5 36.Re7 axb4 37.axb4 Rd8 38.Ba4 Kf8 39.Re1 g5 40.Bd2 Nd4 41.Bc3 Ra8 42.Bd1 Ne6 43.b5 Rc8 44.Bb4 Ke7 45.Kg3 Rb8 46.Be2

2. + - (1.67): 33...Nd4 34.Qxa5 d5 35.Bd6 Rc8 36.Qb6 Nf5 37.Be5 Qc1 38.g4 Qd2 39.Rg1 Ne7 40.Qd4 Qg5 41.Qf4 Qxf4+ 42.Bxf4 d4 43.a4 Nd5 44.Be5 Nxb4 45.Bxd4 Bd5 46.a5 Ra8 47.g5 Nc6 48.Bc3 h5 49.Bxh5 Nxa5 50.Rd1 Bc6 51.Kg3 Nb3 52.Be2

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d 20 dpa

1. + - (1.45): 33.bxa5> Qc3 34.Re3 Qa1 35.Kh2 Qxd1 36.Rg3 Qd5 37.Qf6 g6 38.Bxh6 Qe5 39.Qxe5 dxe5 40.Bxf8 Kxf8 41.Re3 Ke7 42.Rxe5+ Kd6 43.Re1 Nd4 44.Re4 Kc5 45.Re5+ Kd6 46.Re8 Nc6 47.Ra8 Kc5 48.Kg3 Bd5 49.a4 Ne7 50.Rf8 Nf5+ 51.Kg4 Kb4

2. + / - (0.99): 33.Bxh6 axb4 34.axb4 d5 35.Bd2 Qb2 36.Qf4 Nd4 37.Qe3 Nc2 38.Bxc2 Qxc2 39.Bc3 Qd3 40.Qxd3 Bxd3 41.Bd4 Rb8 42.Bc5 Kh7 43.Re7 Kg6 44.Kh2 Bc4 45.Kg3 Kf6 46.f3 g5 47.f4 Rg8 48.Rc7 Ke6

3. + / - (0.91): 33.Qc2 Qc3 34.Qxc3 Nxc3 35.bxa5 Nxd1 36.Rxd1 d5 37.Rb1 f6 38.Bd2 h5 39.Rb7 Rf7 40.Rb6 Ra7 41.f3 Kf7 42.Kf2 Re7 43.Bc3 Re2+ 44.Kg3 Rc2 45.Bd4 Rd2

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d 20 dpa

1. + / - (0.98): 32...Ra8> 33.Qd7 Nc3 34.Qxd6 axb4 35.Be5 Qc1 36.axb4 Rc8 37.Qd7 Be6 38.Qd4 Qxd1 39.Rxd1 Ne2+ 40.Kh2 Nxd4 41.Bxd4 Rb8 42.Bc5 f6 43.g4 Kf7 44.Kg3 Ra8 45.Rd3 Rb8 46.f4 f5 47.Ra3 fxg4 48.Ra7+ Kg6 49.hxg4

2. + / - (1.39): 32...Rf8 33.bxa5 Qc3 34.Re3 Qa1 35.Qc2 Be6 36.Qd3 Ra8 37.Re1 Rxa5 38.Bd2 Qxa3 39.Bb3 d5 40.Bxa5 Qxa5 41.Rc1 Nd6 42.Bc2 Ne4 43.Qe3 Nd6 44.Qd4 Qd8 45.Ra1 Qb8 46.Ra5 g6 47.Qe5 Qd8 48.Ra7 Nb5 49.Rb7 Nd6

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4
30...Nc3 31.Re1 axb4 32.axb4 Nxd1 33.Rxd1 Qa4 34.Qb1 Qb5 35.Qb3 Rc5 36.Bxh6 Rxd5 37.Rxd5 Qxd5 38.Qxd5 Bxd5 39.Bf4 Bc6 40.Bxd6 f6 41.f3 Kf7 42.Kf2 Ke6 43.Bc5 Ke5 44.Ke3 Kd5 45.h4 Kc4 46.h5 Bb7 47.Kf4 + / - (0.78) Depth: 23 dpa

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d 21 dpa

1. + / = (0.53): 27...Qa1> 28.Bxh6 Ne8 29.Be3 Qxc3 30.Rd3 Qc4 31.Bd4 b4 32.Bb2 bxa3 33.Rxa3 Qxd5 34.Qxd5 Bxd5 35.Rxa5 Bc4 36.Kh2 Nc7 37.Ra7 Nb5 38.Re7 d5 39.Bg4 Ra8 40.Bd7 Nd6 41.Bd4 Ra2 42.Bc6

2. + / - (0.98): 27...Ne8 28.Kh2 Qa1 29.Rd3 h5 30.Be3 h4 31.Bd4 Qb1 32.Qe2 Nf6 33.Bxf6 gxf6 34.Qg4+ Kf8 35.Rd4 Rc4 36.Qxh4 Rxd4 37.Qxd4 Qf5 38.Be2 Qe5+ 39.Qxe5 fxe5 40.Bxb5 Bxd5 41.c4 Bb7 42.Kg3 Kg7 43.f3 Kf6 44.Kf2 Kf5 45.Ke3 d5 46.cxd5 Bxd5 47.Bd3+ Ke6

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d 23 dpa

1. + / = (0.38): 25...Na6> 26.Re3 a4 27.Ba2 Nc5 28.Bb1 Bxd5 29.Qxd5 Qxf4 30.Qc6 Rf8 31.Qxb5 Qg5 32.Qc4 Qf6 33.Qb4 Qd8 34.Qf4 Qd7 35.Bf5 Qc6 36.Bc2 Qd5 37.Bxa4 g5 38.Qg4 Rb8 39.Bc2 Rb2 40.Re8+ Kg7 41.Re2 Ne6 42.Bd3 Rb3 43.Bc4 Rb1+

2. + / = (0.50): 25...Re8 26.f3 Rxe4 27.fxe4 Na6 28.Bc2 Nc5 29.Bh2 g5 30.Qf2 Qxf2+ 31.Kxf2 f5 32.exf5 Bxd5 33.g4 Kf7 34.Bxd6 Ne4+ 35.Bxe4 Bxe4 36.Be5 Bd5 37.Bd4 a4 38.Kg3 Bb7 39.h4 Ba8 40.Be3 Kf6 41.hxg5+ hxg5 42.Kf2 Bd5 43.Bb6 Ke7 44.Ke3 Bc4 45.Kd4

Jan-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 <d 27 dpa done

1. = (0.25): 22...b5> 23.Bb3 a5 24.a3 Re8 25.Rxe8+ Nxe8 26.Bg3 Nc7 27.Qe3 Qf5 28.Qa7 Qb1+ 29.Kh2 Qxb3 30.Qb8+ Ne8 31.Qxe8+ Kh7 32.Qxf7 Qxd5 33.Qxd5 Bxd5 34.Bxd6 g5 35.Bc7 a4 36.f3 Kg6 37.Kg3 Kf5 38.Kf2 Bc4 39.g4+ Ke6 40.f4 Kd7 41.Be5 Ke6 42.Ke3 Kd5 43.Bd4

2. + / = (0.40): 22...Rc8 23.Re4 b5 24.Bb3 a5 25.a3 Re8 26.f3 Rxe4 27.fxe4 Na6 28.Be3 Nc5 29.Bc2 Qh4 30.Qf2 Qe7 31.Qf4 f6 32.Bxc5 dxc5 33.Qb8+ Kf7 34.Qa7 Qc7 35.d6 Qc6 36.Qxa5 Qxd6 37.Qxb5 Ba6 38.Bb3+ Kf8 39.Qa5 c4 40.Ba4 Bb7 41.Qb5 Qe7 42.Qxc4 Qxe4 43.Qxe4 Bxe4 44.Kf2 Ke7 45.Bd1 Kd6

Jan-17-19  fabelhaft: Kramnik has remarkably weak results as black against the young Russians born in 1990. He has scored +0-12=10 against Nepomniachtchi, Andreikin and Karjakin as black, and they have usually been quite far from the top of the rating list while Kramnik has been top 5 during most of these encounters.

Nepomniachtchi and Andreikin have on average been around #30 and Karjakin maybe #10-15 but the first years much lower than that. He reached the top 20 for the first time in 2008, four years after his first games against Kramnik. Even if Nepomniachtchi has improved lately he has still never been top ten on an official rating list, but his wins against Kramnik (including this one) look quite convincing.

Jan-17-19  fabelhaft: I checked the results of a couple of the older players (that both turn 50 this year) as black against the same opponents. Anand has +3-2=13 and Ivanchuk +4-1=13 against them, which makes Kramnik's +0-12=10 even more surprising.
Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: That is a remarkable statistic, <fabelhaft>. Very interesting. His results against the Russian "younger guns" are so bad that one may wonder if it's a psychological thing, who knows?

An alternative explanation can be that younger Russian players have studied Kramnik's games quite extensively already from a very young age, and are therefore well prepared to meet him.

Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: And yet another alternative explanation is that Anand and Ivanchuk are geniuses and Kramnik is not, which is what I've always thought, ratings be damned.
Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Count Wedgemore: <CHC> LOL. Is there any Russian you don't dislike? Were you dumped by a Russian girl in your youth or something?
Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Kramnik is almost the only Russian player I do dislike. Anand and Ivanchuk have flabbergasting tactics and combinations versus Kramnik with his cramped, embittered, tenacious, constipated style of the type I love to hate, although I admit he had strong tactics in his heyday.
Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <ChessHigherCat: Kramnik is almost the only Russian player I do dislike. Anand and Ivanchuk have flabbergasting tactics and combinations versus Kramnik with his cramped, embittered, tenacious, constipated style of the type I love to hate, although I admit he had strong tactics in his heyday.>

I'm not going to get in a fight with you, we're all allowed to have likes and dislikes, but to me what you've written seems to take his Berlin defenses and spread it over his whole oevre -- I hope that doesn't sound hopelessly pretentious. I thought his games against the King's Indian, when it seemed like he practically put it out of business, were gorgeous.

I remember being blown away by this game when it was played.

Kramnik vs Van Wely, 2008

Then I came across it again years later (having forgotten it in the meantime) and was blown away again. But by his standards it's not all that remarkable.

He loses more nowadays partly because he plays with more freedom, which means he plays lots of remarkable games. Kind of like Botvinnik, after he was no longer thinking about the title.

<fabelhaft> Thanks, fascinating.

Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: <keypusher>: Thanks for the game. It was okay but Van Wely made it a lot easier for him by playing 20...Qxc4 (-2.60) instead of 20..Ba6 (-0.60). Don't know what inspired the queen to impale herself on that pawn fork! As a former world champ he obviously is a very strong player but if I had to choose between the best games of Anand/Ivanchuk versus the best games of Kramnik I wouldn't hesitate to relegate the latter to the dust bin of history.

Not to mention that I really do believe he was guilty of misconduct in Toiletgate but I don't want to get in a never-ending debate with the Russbots about that, either.

Jan-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: P.S. Sorry, I got the signs reversed: Van Wely was black, so he played 20...Qc4 (+2.60) instead of 20...Ba6 (+0.60). Do you ever realize you made a mistake hours later when you're doing something entirely unrelated? I do that all the time. A better talent than realizing I made a mistake would be not making the mistake in the first place, but I doubt I'll ever get there.
Jan-21-19  fabelhaft: <His results against the Russian "younger guns" are so bad that one may wonder if it's a psychological thing, who knows?>

Come to think of it, his countrymen have not been good to him in general. Moro beat him in the 2007 World Championship, Grischuk eliminated him in the 2011 Candidates, Karjakin and Svidler beat him in the 2014 Candidates, and Grischuk and Karjakin did it in the 2018 Candidates. Not much help from fellow Russians there. And to that one could add that he never finished top three in the national championships that Svidler has won eight times.

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