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Ludwig Ernst Bachmann vs Fiechtl
Regensberg (1887)
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Rio Gambit Accepted (C67)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-22-19  mel gibson: Checkmate in 15 moves! -
it's one of those fool's mates - LOL.
May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: This game demonstrates a cute trap in the Ruy Lopez after 7...Nxe5? 8. Rxe5+ ±.

Black's game takes a clear turn for the worse after falling for the trap 7...Nxe5? 8. Rxe5+ ± (+1.25 @ 34 ply, Stockfish 10).

Instead, 7...Be7 = (-0.12 @ 38 ply, Stockfish 10) gives Black a good game. Of the six games with 7...Be7 in our Opening Explorer, Black has no losses (four wins and two draws).

Technically, the losing move appears to be 9...d6? allowing 10. Rxe7+ +- (+2.04 @ 34 ply, Stockfish 10).

Instead, 9...Kf8 gives Black drawing chances as play might continue 10. Rxe7 c6 11. Qf3 f6 12. Qg4 Rg8 13. Re1 d6 14. Qc4 Kf7! 15. Re7+ Kf8 16. Re3 Kf8 17. a4 Be6 18. axb5 Bxd5 19. Qh4 Re8 20. Qxh7 a6 21. bxc6 Bxc6 22. Qh5+ Kg8 23. Raa3 ± (+1.00 @ 36 ply, Stockfish 10).

White almost lets Black turn the tables and win game with 11. Qf3?, potentially allowing <NM Rouselle>'s recommendation 11...Be6! ∓ to -+ (-1.60 @ 35 ply, Stockfish 10).

Black's final, decisive mistake is not punishing 11. Qf3? with 11...Be6! ∓ to -+.

Instead, after 11...f6 12. d6! +- (+6.56 @ 32 ply, Stockfish 10) White wins easily. Also hopeless for Black is 11...Qxe7 12. Nxe7 Kxe7 13. Qe2+ Be6 14. Qxb5 +- (+7.75 @ 37 ply, Stockish 10).

May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Instead of 11. Qf3?, allowing 11...Be6 ∓ to -+, White should play 11. d4! +- (+2.15 @ 27 ply, Stockfish 10) as 11. d4! c6? can be met with 12. Bg5! +- (+5.17 @ 29 ply, Stockfish 10).
May-22-19  The Kings Domain: Nice puzzle and a fun attacking game.
May-22-19  schachfuchs: I only (too quickly) picked 13.Qh5 Qxe7 14.Nxe7 Kxe7 15.Bh6 +3.3, but missed the nice R-B-N mate.
May-22-19  Knightcarver: This pattern is usually called "Boden's Mate," after Samuel S Boden, a contemporary of Morphy. The original Boden's mate is with both Bishops after the Queen sac. Reference, "The Art of the Checkmate," by Renaud and Kahn.
May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: #3, obviously.
May-22-19  TheaN: <Knightcarver: This pattern is usually called "Boden's Mate," after Samuel S Boden, a contemporary of Morphy. The original Boden's mate is with both Bishops after the Queen sac. Reference, "The Art of the Checkmate," by Renaud and Kahn.>

Isn't Boden <exactly> the double bishop mate following the Queen sac opening up the short diagonal? Although the mate in this game follows the moves played, the mate concept is very different.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boden...

<Boden's Mate is a checkmating pattern in chess characterized by bishops on two criss-crossing diagonals (for example, bishops on a6 and f4 delivering mate to a king on c8), with possible flight squares for the king being occupied by friendly pieces.>

May-22-19  TheaN: See also the Peruvian Immortal as perhaps the clearest example:

E Canal vs NN, 1934

May-22-19  TheaN: The above combination is actually a good example to discuss the 'resignation etiquette'. I've noticed this is an interesting point of discussion among chess players: when to resign, continue playing or whether to allow mating combinations to be finished. In the above position after 13.Qxf6+ Black has <four> options:

1) Play the mate out, obviously meaning Black saw the mate and uses combination courtesy to allow White to finish it. Perfectly fine.

2) Resign after 14.Bh6+. This is a bit lame but justified if Black hadn't yet considered he'd be mated after taking the Queen.

3) Resign immediately. Dull, but alas, Black considers himself properly beaten by a Queen sac and has the right to do so.

4) Playing 13....Kg8. And that's a d#ck move. If 13....Kg8 would be played in the above combination Black has obviously seen that he's getting mated after 13....gxf6. However, he refuses to allow that to come on the board or to resign, basically giving himself the satisfaction to force White to play a dull #1 after Kg8. As such, I'd return the favor and play 14.Bh6. If Black starts to throw material to prevent mate, don't actually mate but clean the board first.

To be more precise, I'd probably follow <13....Kg8 14.Bh6!> with <15.Bxg7!> on almost any Black move (if 14....gxf6 15.Nxf6# and 14....Qxe7 15.Nxe7# of course, do want to win!) and <16.Bxh8> and just play it out.

May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Breunor: I also went for Bh6. Glad to see it is winning (over +8 on the computer) but unfortunately not the best move.
May-22-19  lost in space: In a blitz game I would have played 13. Bh6 an dI guess this move is wining.

With more time I would have found 13. Qxf6+, the more forcing move.

May-22-19  Nosnibor: Black can hang on longer with 12..Qxe7 13 Nxe7 Kxe7 when he obtains Rook and Knight for Queen.But his position is not too rosy.
May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  swclark25: Can someone help me understand this?

Per <patzer2>, I put 11...Be6 in the Computer Move Analysis with Fuel set on Fumes and ran.

It gave the following..
1) -1.00 (20 ply) 12.Rxe6 Nd4 13.Qe4 Nxe6 14.d3 c6 15.Nf4 Nc5 16.Qc4 Qf6 17.Nh5 Re8 18.Qb4 Qe5 19.Bf4 Qd5 20.Ng3 h5 21.Ne4 Nxe4 22.dxe4 Qxe4 23.Bxd6+ Kg8 24.Qxb7 Qxc2

I don't understand 24...Qxc2.

Seems that 24...Qe1+ 25.Rxe1 Rxe1# is better.

Is this because I did the Analysis on Fumes, or did I miss a move?

May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diademas: <swclark25: Can someone help me understand this? Per <patzer2>, I put 11...Be6 in the Computer Move Analysis with Fuel set on Fumes and ran.

It gave the following..
1) -1.00 (20 ply) 12.Rxe6 Nd4 13.Qe4 Nxe6 14.d3 c6 15.Nf4 Nc5 16.Qc4 Qf6 17.Nh5 Re8 18.Qb4 Qe5 19.Bf4 Qd5 20.Ng3 h5 21.Ne4 Nxe4 22.dxe4 Qxe4 23.Bxd6+ Kg8 24.Qxb7 Qxc2

I don't understand 24...Qxc2.

Seems that 24...Qe1+ 25.Rxe1 Rxe1# is better.

Is this because I did the Analysis on Fumes, or did I miss a move?>

Looks correct to me. But 20 ply is 20 ply, so the banal mate on ply 24 (or whatever) is missed

May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  swclark25: Thanks for the reply <Diademas>. I reran the analysis and chose Fuel at 240. The results showed 3 different lines with the best for black after 11...Be6 being

3) -2.37 (31 ply) 12.Nc3 Nd4 13.Qe4 Qxe7 14.Qxd4 Bf5 15.h3 Bxc2 16.Qe3 Re8 17.d3 Qxe3 18.Bxe3 Bxd3 19.Rd1 Ba6 20.Nd5 c6 21.Nc3 Ke7 22.Bxa7 f6 23.f3 d5 24.b3 Kf7 25.Bd4 g5 26.Bb6 h5 27.Bc5 h4 28.a4 Kg6

Lots of possibilities...I do like to look at kibitzers' comments on where things went wrong and how/when to correct.

May-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: <Knightcarver> Unfortunately, "The Art of the Checkmate" by Renaud and Kahn does not have an index of players/games listed in the back. However, it's arrangement by checkmate pattern w/variations is user friendly.

This particular game is not included in the classic book, it seems. This mating pattern is rather unique, thanks in part to the Rh8. Game 75 on pages 169-171 is a Ruy Lopez with mild similarities along the 6th rank.

Boden's Mate with the criss-cross bishops (often shown with a preceding Queen sacrifice fracturing the pawn structure as in this game) is Chapter 6, pages 89-93.

Mate by Minor Pieces is Chapter 18, pages 167-173.

Mate of the Two Bishops is Chapter 19, pages 174-175.

Mate of the Two Knights is Chapter 20, pages 176-178.

Bishop and Knight Mate is Chapter 21, pages 179-181.

The most common Nf6 mating pattern is The Arabian Mate w/the knight supporting the rook on the edge. It is found in Chapter 22, pages 182-183.

The point is, "The Art of the Checkmate" covers all types of checkmate patterns rather well. It does focus on the more typical patterns and more famous finishes. These are fantastic finishes by legendary grandmasters, so it's not a beginner's book by any stretch. "How to Force Checkmate" by Fred Reinfeld (300 puzzles in 1, 2, or 3 moves) is more suitable for students.

The above game is NOT included in "The Art of Attack in Chess" by Vladimir Vukovic either. This classic is another source for checkmate patterns.

May-22-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. = / + (-0.26): 7...Be7 8.Nxb5 Nxe5 9.Rxe5 d6 10.Re1 0-0 11.d4 c6 12.Nc3 Bf5 13.Bf4 Re8 14.Qd2 Qb6 15.Ne4 Bf8 16.Ng3 Bg6 17.b3 d5 18.c3 Rad8 19.Rad1 Qa5 20.h4 f6 21.a4 h6 22.h5

2. + / - (1.01): 7...Nxe5 8.Rxe5+ Be7 9.Nd5 Kf8 10.Rxe7 c6 11.Qf3 f6 12.Qg4 Rg8 13.Re1 d6 14.Qb4 Kf7 15.Re7+ Kf8 16.Re2 Kf7 17.a4 Re8 18.Rxe8 Qxe8 19.Ne3 Nc7 20.Qxd6 Nd5 21.d3 Qe7 22.Qxe7+ Nxe7 23.f3 c5 24.Bd2 Bd7 25.Nc4 Nf5 26.Kf2 Re8 27.g4

May-22-19  R4f43l L3 M4550n: 7.Nxe5 'Cunning play. If Black now takes one of the Knights he loses.' - Emanuel Lasker in 'Common Sense in Chess'
May-24-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Here's a somewhat similar mating pattern typical of king pawn fianchetto defenses that create weaknesses on the 6th rank.

R Bass vs R Armstrong, 1952

May-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Here's an impressive queen sacrifice for mate by the Black pieces w/Bishop and Knight on the 3rd rank, but on different files.

Note: This particular minor piece pattern (both pieces blockading unmoved isolated pawns) works whenever the winning bishop is "over the top" of the losing rook -- both on the same file. So, if the helpless rook is in the corner, the bishop is on the h-file. If the castled rook is on the f-file, so is the bishop. The knight gives checkmate to the restricted king on the g-file.

May-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Here's an impressive queen sacrifice for mate by the Black pieces w/Bishop and Knight on the 3rd rank, but on different files than Ludwig Ernst Bachmann vs Fiechtl.

O Field vs O Tenner, 1923

Note: This particular minor piece pattern (both pieces blockading unmoved isolated pawns) works whenever the winning bishop is "over the top" of the losing rook -- both on the same file. So, if the helpless rook is in the corner, the bishop is on the h-file. If the castled rook is on the f-file, so is the bishop. The knight gives checkmate to the king restricted to the g-file.

May-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: FTB needs to remember that "A picture is worth a thousand words."

Compare Bishop to Rook on the h-file:


click for larger view

Compare Bishop to Rook on the f-file:


click for larger view

May-25-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: If the King is caught on the f-file, the restriction differs slightly and the Bishop delivers checkmate:


click for larger view

or


click for larger view

All of these diagrams show there is great value in blockading the opponent's isolated pawns and backward pawns!

May-27-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: Here's an unusual Nf6 mating pattern using a pin on the g-file to freeze the defender:

Fischer vs Greenblatt, 1977

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