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Ding Liren vs Fabiano Caruana
Norway Chess (2019), Stavanger NOR, rd 3, Jun-06
Indian Game: Tartakower Attack (A45)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jun-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Last flip of the coin by Caruana who has just played 76...Bd4-g7.


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If the hasty 77.h6 Bxh6 78.Nxh6 Kg5 draws.

But if that had happened Fabiano would then have to play an Armageddon game and that is what I thought it was when here...


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Fabs played 10...Nc6 inviting the chop on c6 and then on f6 followed by Qc3 with a double attack. Maybe 10...Nbd7 gets the Nxe6 sac. but it does not look like there is not enough to back it up.

Maybe Fabs meant it, he is a pawn up and gave it back to get rid of two active White bits before Rc1 comes.

***

Jun-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

"...but it does not look like there is not enough to back it up."

Eh? should read.

"It does not look like there is enough to back it up."

***

Jun-07-19  That Roger: Move 44 black has 2 passed pawns, 45. could have kept it taking with e pawn but don't know about any white near tactical combos why black did not, and dont know why 55. 56. gave up h pawn by blocking bishop defending with king
Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <That Roger>
45. taking with the e pawn would unprotect the f5 square, so 45...exd5 46. Bb1 h4 <47. Nf5+> picks up Black's h-pawn.
Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Interesting gambit by White, esp. since Black had sprung a surprise innovation with 6...a6!? (not in the database). Wondering about 10...Be7; perhaps Black feared 11.Rc1,Qd8; 12.Qc2,Nbd7 would cramp him too much, but is that really best play for both sides?
Jun-07-19  Ulhumbrus: If 10...Nc6 invites the potential fork Qc3 one alternative is 10...Be7 first.
Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi Ulhumbrus:

If 10...Be7 here.


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AS I suggested Rc1 looks troublesome. If the BQ moves there is Rxc8 and Bxb7.

I'll give the nod to Caruana (who is not too bad a player) that he did not miss the Qc3 trick but judged it the best way to go in a difficult looking position loaded with snares.

***

Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <That Roger>
As for your other question why Black decided to drop the h-pawn with 54...Kf6 and 55...f4, I can only guess Black wanted to prevent White from locking the kingside, for example if 55...Kg6 White has 55. Ne5+ followed by 56. f4.

In the game, if White played 55. f4, Black breaks out tactically with <55...e5> 56. Bxd5 exf4 57. exf4 <Bxf4> 58. Nxf4 Ke5, forking back the piece. The result looks drawn.


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But if he had to sacrifice a pawn to prevent an f4 lockdown, he might instead consider <54...f4> 55. exf4 Kg6 56. Ng2 Kf5 57. Kd3 Bf6. It doesn't look worse than the actual game.


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Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <That Roger>
Oops, I forgot a move in my kibitz above. The line should have been 55. f4 e5 56. Bxd5 exf4 57. exf4 Bd6 58. Ng2 Bxf4 59. Nxf4 Ke5 leading to the position in my first diagram above.
Jun-07-19  Ulhumbrus: <Sally Simpson: ***

Hi Ulhumbrus:

If 10...Be7 here.

click for larger view

AS I suggested Rc1 looks troublesome. If the BQ moves there is Rxc8 and Bxb7.

I'll give the nod to Caruana (who is not too bad a player) that he did not miss the Qc3 trick but judged it the best way to go in a difficult looking position loaded with snares.

***>

If Black gets into trouble whatever he does suppose we compare the respective states of development for White and Black.

In the position after 10 Qb3 White has a lead of no less than five moves in development, far too much for a pawn if he can make his lead in development count.

This suggests that Caruana has to look for an alternative before this point.

In the position after 8 c4 White has a lead of two moves in development. This suggests that White is advised to open lines in order to make count his lead in development, and that Black is advised to avoid opening lines.

When after 8 c4 Black does open lines - in a position where he is behind in development - in order to win a pawn on c4 - he falls back further still back in development.

An alternative to 8...dxc4 is 8...Be7 and on 9 cxd5 Nxd5 Black has caught up in development.

Suppose that Black does take a pawn but only in order to return it. One alternative is 9...Be7. Then on 10 bxc4 0-0 Black may catch up in development while White's a and c pawns are isolated.

It may be that Caruana's mistake was to try to hold on to the pawn. The price for it consisted of too much time lost for development. Lasker says that to try to hold on to such a gambit pawn never pays in the end, and by far the better policy is to return it in order to catch up in development.

Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

<It may be that Caruana's mistake was to try to hold on to the pawn. >

I'm now sure Caruana took the pawn with every intention of giving it back and he chose the right moment.

I see the others are talking about improvements much later in the game so Caruana's choice seemed to have been OK if it got him into a late middle game though he seems to have been playing catch up which is all the more credit to Ding's play for holding the plus for so long.

***

Jun-07-19  Imran Iskandar: Not often you see Caruana fall behind so early in the opening. As others have mentioned, some questionable decisions by him, e.g. 45...cxd5 instead of exd5, giving up the h4 pawn, etc. Not a game Caruana will want to look back on in a hurry.
Jun-07-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Imran Iskandar> What did you find after 45...exd5 46. Bb1 apparently winning the h-pawn, as I posted above?

What improvement did you find around moves 54-55 when White was threatening to lock the kingside with f4, as I posted above?

Jun-08-19  Ulhumbrus: <Sally Simpson: ***

<It may be that Caruana's mistake was to try to hold on to the pawn. >

I'm now sure Caruana took the pawn with every intention of giving it back and he chose the right moment. > The course which the game took after 13 Qc3 suggests to me that he chose the wrong moment. He lost the right to castle, then his king's rook became placed very badly on g7, then he lost a piece and eventually he lost the game. Even if he could have struggled successfully for a draw and saved himself, he could hardly have wanted no more than that.

Jun-08-19  ex0duz: <some questionable decisions by him, e.g. 45...cxd5 instead of exd5>

This is questionable? Make 4 pawn islands instead of 3? Maybe questionable if you had engine and unlimited time, but he was probably low on time at that stage and had to play principled and solidly.. can't blame him too much. Ding just played an awesome game and blew him away ever since Nc6 move in the opening.

I've been saying for a long time now Ding is the best challenger for carlsens title, and with Dings impressive win over the only other player rated higher than him who's not carlsen, I think it gives my claim a lot of merit.

Also looking at games between carlsen and Ding, Ding had many winning chances and positions and if anything had the chances in the games they played which ultimately ended in draw..

Gar Yao Ding! Gar Yao means "come on" or "good luck" in Mandarin Chinese. Ding is buiding rivalry with carlsen imo. Caruana had one but he didn't take his chances in the match. Aronian had one but he's long fell down from top 3 spot, now it's carlsen caruana and Ding in top 3, with 4th place being a lot lower ranked. Like 30 points less than Ding at rank 3.

Jun-08-19  ex0duz: I must thank Ding for making me finally learn how to mate with bishop and knight. I just spent the last 2 hours watching chess network tutorial on YouTube and playing this game out to mate. Here's the link for chess networks tutorial video.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=r3EqM17...

Chess network mate is easy to remember but takes longer than the way Akopian teaches on the saint Louis chess channel. Akopian teaches a knight method doing W jumping pattern which is more confusing than the bishop triangle method chess network showed. I guess it doesn't hurt to know multiple ways. Here's the link for Akopian method.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=7OGAiz5...

What method to win this endgame does everyone here use? Or rather, prefer, since I doubt you get this endgame often lol. And do you know of any other method than the two I just mentioned? The finishing pattern with bishop attacking the corner square and knight attacking the 2 opposite colour(from your bishop) corner squares is also almost always the result, although in Akopian example the white knight only attacked c8 since it was on a6 with white king on b6 and bishop check mating black king on a8 from Bc6##.

Jun-08-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <Imran Iskandar>,<ex0duz> For the third time already, 45...exd5 allows 46. Bb1 h4 47. Nf5+ winning the h-pawn. Am I wrong?
Jun-09-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <Imran Iskandar> Caruana was on such a meteoric hot streak last year, but now, seems seriously "out-of-sorts"
Jun-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <ex0duz>
<Gar Yao means "come on" or "good luck" in Mandarin Chinese.> Which part of China is that from? Sounds more like the South. I think you probably mean 加油 which in Mandarin is pronounced "Jia Yo".
Jun-14-19  csmath: The main point of the game is the opening surprise for Caruana (after he avoided Catalan) 9. Bb2! to put him in defensive game and then long manouvres when Caruana finally lost bearing.

Ding missed 43. Qb7! which leads to a loss of a-pawn for black but overall this is pretty impressive display of technical mastery.

Jun-14-19  csmath: 9. Bb2 is technical novelty here, probably prepared. It is also the choice of engines and thus re-evaluates the whole opening. Caruana spent inodinate amount of time to find the response (cxb3) but did not make the game even.

This is one of the most original games in Stavanger and serious display of a high quality complex middlegame. Worth studying throughout.

Jun-15-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  SugarDom: I think you mean theoritical instead of technical.

And Bb2 seems hardly theoritical to me. They make this move all the time.

Jun-16-19  ex0duz: <beatgiant: <ex0duz> <Gar Yao means "come on" or "good luck" in Mandarin Chinese.> Which part of China is that from? Sounds more like the South. I think you probably mean 加油 which in Mandarin is pronounced "Jia Yo".>

Oops my bad, you are correct. Jia yo is mandarin, gar Yao is Cantonese or Hakka, southern like you said.

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