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Reti Opening (A04)
1 Nf3

Number of games in database: 11818
Years covered: 1850 to 2014
Overall record:
   White wins 35.8%
   Black wins 29.1%
   Draws 35.0%

Popularity graph, by decade

Explore this opening  |  Search for sacrifices in this opening.
PRACTITIONERS
With the White Pieces With the Black Pieces
Mark Taimanov  115 games
Ulf Andersson  110 games
Rafael Vaganian  83 games
Bent Larsen  59 games
Dragoljub Velimirovic  42 games
Andras Adorjan  40 games
NOTABLE GAMES [what is this?]
White Wins Black Wins
Petrosian vs Pachman, 1961
Fischer vs P Lapiken, 1956
Panno vs Spassky, 1955
J L Hammer vs Carlsen, 2003
Petrosian vs Fischer, 1971
Topalov vs Ivanchuk, 1999
<< previous chapter next chapter >>

 page 1 of 473; games 1-25 of 11,818 
Game  ResultMoves Year Event/LocaleOpening
1. Mohishunder vs Cochrane  0-147 1850 CalcuttaA04 Reti Opening
2. R Brien vs F G Janssens  1-027 1854 London mA04 Reti Opening
3. F Riemann vs Blackburne 0-129 1881 BerlinA04 Reti Opening
4. C F Schmid vs W Paulsen ½-½74 1881 BerlinA04 Reti Opening
5. J Minckwitz vs J Mason  ½-½61 1881 BerlinA04 Reti Opening
6. Blackburne vs A Schwarz ½-½90 1882 ViennaA04 Reti Opening
7. A Skipworth vs Bird ½-½59 1883 LondonA04 Reti Opening
8. A Skipworth vs Blackburne 0-125 1883 LondonA04 Reti Opening
9. J N Berger vs W Paulsen  ½-½51 1883 NurembergA04 Reti Opening
10. A Schottlaender vs M Lange ½-½34 1883 NurembergA04 Reti Opening
11. J Minchin vs J Lord  0-154 1883 London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
12. T H Piper vs L Benima 1-038 1883 London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
13. T H Piper vs F S Ensor 1-024 1883 London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
14. T H Piper vs B W Fisher  1-021 1883 London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
15. T H Piper vs C E Ranken  0-134 1883 London (Vizayanagaram)A04 Reti Opening
16. Burn vs Owen 1-040 1884 LiverpoolA04 Reti Opening
17. Burn vs Mackenzie ½-½58 1886 London mA04 Reti Opening
18. Burn vs W Pollock 0-135 1886 Irish CA Congress 2ndA04 Reti Opening
19. Burn vs Chigorin 0-168 1889 USA-06.Congress New YorkA04 Reti Opening
20. Blackburne vs Mieses  1-057 1889 BreslauA04 Reti Opening
21. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-052 1889 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship MatchA04 Reti Opening
22. Lasker vs A van Foreest 1-050 1889 AmsterdamA04 Reti Opening
23. Gunsberg vs Chigorin  1-065 1890 Havana mA04 Reti Opening
24. Steinitz vs Chigorin 1-039 1892 Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship RematchA04 Reti Opening
25. D Bleijkmans vs J H Peet  0-124 1892 NSB competitionA04 Reti Opening
 page 1 of 473; games 1-25 of 11,818 
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2)  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 4 OF 4 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-26-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: Yes, that's it. Some real nice Retis and Englishs in Golombek's book on Richard Reti.

For the QID you get !/2 as a hypermodern. ;)

Mar-27-09  chessman95: Only a half of a "!"??????

Hmm... maybe I'll start playing this opening:


click for larger view

How's that for hypermodern? :)

Mar-27-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: Hippo Reversed!!! You'll get !x3 for that, LOL!
Mar-27-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: <Hmm... maybe I'll start playing this opening: >

Blatny has played this with some success.

Also <chessman95> Might you point me to the CG Help to import Diagrams and also hyper-links to games?

Thank You!

Mar-27-09  chessman95: <Might you point me to the CG Help to import Diagrams>

I just wrote that diagram. Do you know how to write FEN? In case you don't, here's a helpful link: FEN Help Page

If you were asking how to import diagrams, then you just right-click on a position and copy it to your clipboard, and then paste it on a post. lol

Mar-27-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: Thanks for the FEN link!!
Mar-27-09  chessman95: <parisattack> I looked over that page and noticed it didn't contain all the information about FEN. Here's my explaination:

For the sample, I will use a position from the English Attack in the Najdorf:


click for larger view

-- PLEASE NOTE -- I had to put a space in every code so that you would not see an actual diagram when I posted this. If you take the space out between 3N and P3 then you will see an actual diagram.

1) Okay. So as you probably know the first thing to do is start at rank 8 and write out all the peices (black R=r, white rook=R, etc.) and write the number of black spaces, if any, in between until you have done this for all 8 ranks. Make sure to put a "/" in between each rank. For this position it would be: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R >

2) The next step is to put a space in there and write either "w" or "b", depending on what color's turn it is. In this case it's white's turn so the code is now: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R w>

3) Then you put another space and write the catling availability. If nobody can castle, or they already are castled, you put a "-". If white can castle short, you put a "K", if long, you put a "Q". If black can castle short you put a "k", if long a "q". Make sure to do it in that order. In this case nobody can castle, so it's now: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R w ->

4) Next you put another space and write the possible en passants. In this case, black's pawn just went out two spaces to e5, so the possible en passant square would be e6, one behind the square the pawn moved to. Now our code is: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R w - e6>

5) Next you put another space and write the number of halfmoves since the last pawn move or capture, to keep track for the 50 move rule. A pawn just moved in our game, so that number is "0". Now our code is: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R w - e6 0>

6) The last step is to put another space and write what move the game is on. In this case the game went 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.Be3 d5, so we're on the 7th move. Our final code is: <rnbqkb1r/1p3ppp/p2p1n2/4p3/3N P3/2N1B3/PPP2PPP/R2QKB1R w - e6 0 7>

In this way you now contain every peice of information about the particular game I chose to use about an example. Not all of this is needed to make a diagram appear in a post, but it's nice for giving a friend a fun position to analyze when they get home.

I hope this helped, but if it didn't then this page has what I said in a more clear manner: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forsyt...

Mar-27-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: Yes, much help. Appreciate the time; hopefully some others will find your tutorial useful, as well!
Mar-28-09  chessman95: Glad it helped. I might put it in my bio for others to see but I'm not sure I have the room.
Apr-21-09  norcist: <parisattack> <whiskeyrebel>

I see you both share my admiration for Donaldson's book. My only complaint is that some very important lines seem to be neglected (Although this is of course to be expected in such an expansive work). For instance in the Sicilian reversed, to which is devoted several chapters, very little attention is given to the black plan of...c6...Nd7 (rather than Nc6 or Na6), with the eventual idea of f5 playing for a kingside attack. This seems to be a critical test of whites opening, with black sidestepping many of whites more promising ideas. Several high level games have seen this setup and I was wondering if anyone else has had trouble with this flexible black system?

Apr-21-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  parisattack: <norcist: <parisattack> <whiskeyrebel>

There is a bit about it in Chapter 5 of the revised edition is all I see.

Have you checked Schiller's Hypermodern Opening Repertoire for White? I use it for a companion/supplement to John D's book. I think he refs it as the Bled System but don't have the book in front of me at the moment.

Aug-13-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Opening of the Day <Lisitsin Gambit <1.Nf3 f5 2.e4>>


click for larger view

Opening Explorer

Aug-31-09  DHSGRE55: I am grateful to you for the help.
Thanks with all my heart.
My motto in chess
Readiness is all!
Very much I wish to work with the chess information in lots and the theory of debuts. Yours faithfully Hennadii Drobotov
Inform me please what chess club can conclude with me the professional contract I wish that it there was a club from Greece.
Feb-02-11  Penguincw: According to the ChessGames.com Statistics Page this is the most popular opening variation. Weird.
Mar-07-11  Penguincw: Opening of the Day :
Lisitsin Gambit
1.Nf3 f5 2.e4
Jul-11-11  Rook e2: Reti opening as most played opening in the database.

I don't agree, I think Reti is a sequence of moves-> Nf3 d5, c4

Nov-20-11  knighterrant999: What is the difference between the Reti Opening, and Zukertort's Opening?
Mar-02-12  Penguincw: < knighterrant999: What is the difference between the Reti Opening, and Zukertort's Opening? >

Probably different names. Just like <Petrov> and <Russian> or <Robatsch> and <Modern>.

In other news, A04 has been taken over by A07 and trails by 645.

Mar-24-12  Penguincw: Opening of the Day

Lisitsin Gambit
1.Nf3 f5 2.e4


click for larger view

Already unusual after black's 1st move.

Sep-10-12  Conrad93: The Reti is absolutely flawless. It can transpose into any variation you chose.

That's the beauty of it.

Sep-10-12  rapidcitychess: I was trying to transpose into the King's Gambit. Didn't work. :(

However, I would agree that the Reti is a really good and flexible opening. I used it for quite a while; I might use it again.

Jul-06-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: Query: a QGA line is reached via a Reti move order, 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 dc 3.e3 Nc6 4.Bxc4 e5 5.d4 ed:


click for larger view

It's hard to believe it but we are practically in the wilderness already here! In _The Modern Reti_ (2012) Delchev gives 6.0-0! after which I can find only four master games. In only one game did Black take the pawn, and he ended up winning after 6...de 7.Qb3 ef+ 8.Kh1 Be6: http://www.365chess.com/game.php?gi...

But Delchev only mentions 6...Nf6. So, can anyone shed light on White's idea of gambiting the e-pawn? Not for nothing did Delchev award 6.0-0 an exclam, right? FYI Shredder suggests 7.Bxe3 allowing a queen trade, but that hardly looks in the spirit of things. Perhaps 7.Qe2, or Lastin's 7.Qb3<?>

Jul-08-13  Everett: <Shams> this is why the Reti remains so much fun!

In the above line you mention, White has tremendous development for the pawn. Allowing the Q-trade is fine because 1)Black's Q is one of his only active pieces and 2) the White Q is replaced by a R on the d-file, greatly accelerating White's development advantage. So Delchev's line looks solid to me, especially of you like the initiative.

If you wanted to get off that rollercoaster earlier, 5.Nc3 should do it.

Just my opinion, since I play 3.e4 vs the Reti Accepted and avoid the e3 pussyfooting around.

Jul-10-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <Everett> Thanks. I'll give 7.Bxe3 a couple tests and see what happens.
Oct-12-13  Kikoman: <Opening of the Day>

Lisitsin Gambit
1. Nf3 f5 2. e4


click for larger view

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